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number, and the fight was carried on, from traverse to traverse, for seven hours." Porter's assaulting column of sailors and marines was much larger than the whole column that Butler sent to the assault. It attacked, as Secretary Stanton says, "the least difficult side" of the fort; yet it was, as Secretary Stanton says, "after a short conflict, checked and driven back is disorder." And yet they were perfectly brave men. So were the three thousand heroes of Curtis's, Pennypacker's and Bell's brigades, who could not, unaided, get in on the other side; although, as Secretary Stanton says, the sailors and marines "performed the very useful part of diverting the attention of the enemy and weakening the resistance to their attack." And so were Butler's men brave, and so were their leaders; but the bravest men can't do impossible things; and it was a totally impossible thing for Butler's one thousand two hundred men to take that fort. Had it not been for the co-operation of the
Pennypacker (search for this): article 9
were seven in number, and the fight was carried on, from traverse to traverse, for seven hours." Porter's assaulting column of sailors and marines was much larger than the whole column that Butler sent to the assault. It attacked, as Secretary Stanton says, "the least difficult side" of the fort; yet it was, as Secretary Stanton says, "after a short conflict, checked and driven back is disorder." And yet they were perfectly brave men. So were the three thousand heroes of Curtis's, Pennypacker's and Bell's brigades, who could not, unaided, get in on the other side; although, as Secretary Stanton says, the sailors and marines "performed the very useful part of diverting the attention of the enemy and weakening the resistance to their attack." And so were Butler's men brave, and so were their leaders; but the bravest men can't do impossible things; and it was a totally impossible thing for Butler's one thousand two hundred men to take that fort. Had it not been for the co-op
pproach of rebel reinforcements from Wilmington; and had till 3 1-2 o'clock on Sunday afternoon to get ready to assault the fort. The fleet co-operated with Terry, and enabled him to throw this line of defence across the Peninsula, to protect an assault he was going to make with just five times as many men as Butler had to assault with. The Baltimore American records: "An order was received from the Admiral to proceed in shore to cover the encampments of the troops from any assault by Bragg from Wilmington.--Should he come, Captain Glisson will, with the one hundred and twenty-three guns at his command, give him a warm reception." Butler had but one thousand two hundred men to assault with, having left one thousand as a thin line of defence against an attack in his rear. The fire of the fleet in the first expedition had done the fort no injury what over, and had disabled but two of its seventy-two guns. In the second expedition, as Secretary Stanton says: "The
weakening the resistance to their attack." And so were Butler's men brave, and so were their leaders; but the bravest men can't do impossible things; and it was a totally impossible thing for Butler's one thousand two hundred men to take that fort. Had it not been for the co-operation of the fleet in its fire, it is reasonably certain that the assault by Terry would have disastrously failed. Secretary Stanton has, in these few words, described the amazing strength of the fort: "Work unsurpassed, if ever equalled, in strength, and which General Beauregard a few days before pronounced impregnable." If the disposition to co-operate with Butler had existed in the fleet, it could not have persistently co-operated with his assault, if he had persistently made one; for, when Butler was about to move to the attack, Captain Breeze, of the navy, Admiral Porter's chief of staff, informed General Weitzel and Colonel Comstock that the fleet had but one hour's supply of ammunition left.
ew York Tribune contains a long vindication of Butler in the Fort Fisher affair, from the pen of a c military point of view. The writer says that Butler was "jumped" by the Confederates the moment he his command, give him a warm reception." Butler had but one thousand two hundred men to assaulhe earth so that they would not work." In Butler's attack on Fort Fisher the fire of the fleet enemy without injury to our own troops." Butler, with only two thousand and two hundred men asnes was much larger than the whole column that Butler sent to the assault. It attacked, as Secretarg the resistance to their attack." And so were Butler's men brave, and so were their leaders; but thngs; and it was a totally impossible thing for Butler's one thousand two hundred men to take that foe." If the disposition to co-operate with Butler had existed in the fleet, it could not have pelt, if he had persistently made one; for, when Butler was about to move to the attack, Captain Breez[1 more...]
on; and had till 3 1-2 o'clock on Sunday afternoon to get ready to assault the fort. The fleet co-operated with Terry, and enabled him to throw this line of defence across the Peninsula, to protect an assault he was going to make with just five times as many men as Butler had to assault with. The Baltimore American records: "An order was received from the Admiral to proceed in shore to cover the encampments of the troops from any assault by Bragg from Wilmington.--Should he come, Captain Glisson will, with the one hundred and twenty-three guns at his command, give him a warm reception." Butler had but one thousand two hundred men to assault with, having left one thousand as a thin line of defence against an attack in his rear. The fire of the fleet in the first expedition had done the fort no injury what over, and had disabled but two of its seventy-two guns. In the second expedition, as Secretary Stanton says: "The sea front of the fort had been been greatly
eakening the resistance to their attack." And so were Butler's men brave, and so were their leaders; but the bravest men can't do impossible things; and it was a totally impossible thing for Butler's one thousand two hundred men to take that fort. Had it not been for the co-operation of the fleet in its fire, it is reasonably certain that the assault by Terry would have disastrously failed. Secretary Stanton has, in these few words, described the amazing strength of the fort: "Work unsurpassed, if ever equalled, in strength, and which General Beauregard a few days before pronounced impregnable." If the disposition to co-operate with Butler had existed in the fleet, it could not have persistently co-operated with his assault, if he had persistently made one; for, when Butler was about to move to the attack, Captain Breeze, of the navy, Admiral Porter's chief of staff, informed General Weitzel and Colonel Comstock that the fleet had but one hour's supply of ammunition left.
d, and had only six thousand five hundred men in all; while Terry, with twelve thousand five hundred, was allowed to land without interruption. He adds: Terry landed quietly on Friday; had all Saturday to establish a line of breast-works, withready to assault the fort. The fleet co-operated with Terry, and enabled him to throw this line of defence across the Pdid not injure or weaken the land face of the fort. In Terry's attack, the fire of the fleet dismounted and injured all of the guns on the land side, where Terry was to attack, and all of the guns on the sea side. Notwithstanding the injury the assaulting column. By signals between himself and General Terry at brief intervals, this fire was so well managed as to the fire of the fleet. Injured and its fire silenced, Terry could not take it with six thousand men (troops, sailors ant in its fire, it is reasonably certain that the assault by Terry would have disastrously failed. Secretary Stanton has, in
e fort had been been greatly damaged and broken by a continuous and terrible fire of the fleet for three days." Admiral Porter also says: "It was soon apparent that the iron vessels had the best of it; traverses began to disappear, and th "By a skillfully-directed fire thrown into the traverses, one after another as they were occupied by the enemy, Admiral Porter contributed to the success of the assaulting column. By signals between himself and General Terry at brief intervalso be driven. They were seven in number, and the fight was carried on, from traverse to traverse, for seven hours." Porter's assaulting column of sailors and marines was much larger than the whole column that Butler sent to the assault. It attault, if he had persistently made one; for, when Butler was about to move to the attack, Captain Breeze, of the navy, Admiral Porter's chief of staff, informed General Weitzel and Colonel Comstock that the fleet had but one hour's supply of ammunitio
t two of its seventy-two guns. In the second expedition, as Secretary Stanton says: "The sea front of the fort had been been greatly , with all the help the fleet could give them. Of this help, Secretary Stanton says: "By a skillfully-directed fire thrown into the tr'clock till ten for the combined nine thousand to do it. Secretary Stanton says: "The works were so constructed that every travershole column that Butler sent to the assault. It attacked, as Secretary Stanton says, "the least difficult side" of the fort; yet it was, as Secretary Stanton says, "after a short conflict, checked and driven back is disorder." And yet they were perfectly brave men. So were the thrho could not, unaided, get in on the other side; although, as Secretary Stanton says, the sailors and marines "performed the very useful partin that the assault by Terry would have disastrously failed. Secretary Stanton has, in these few words, described the amazing strength of th
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