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United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
uld receive us as a gift. We may, therefore, save ourselves the trouble of abolishing slavery. The best authority now assures us that slavery is not the reason we do not obtain European recognition. The truth is, neither Europe nor the United States desire the abolition of slavery. It is indispensable to the commerce of the world. It is valuable, besides to Europe in drawing off the attention of its own pauper population from the contemplation of their domestic grievances. The imaginaut has given us to understand that the interests of Europe would not permit any European State to accept the Southern Confederacy even if we should tender them the gift. It is true, no rational being in the country has seriously entertained any such suggestion; but, after such mad projects as have been broached, there is no knowing what moonshine dreams may next flit across the human brain. Let us understand them once for all, that we must either belong to ourselves or to the United States.
foot promptly and flatly. "Every State of Europe," says the Times, "acknowledged the Republic when it was governed by a Constitution permitting slavery as fully as the Southern States permit it now.--Why should its abandonment by the Confederacy buy a recognition that is withheld for many other reasons?" Precisely! What could be more sensible? Nay, the Times goes further; and, as if to put us out of our misery in case we entertain any eccentric notion of a European protectorate, says that England will certainly decline it, and it knows no other European Power which would accept the offer. It is the case of the Netherlands over again — no one would receive us as a gift. We may, therefore, save ourselves the trouble of abolishing slavery. The best authority now assures us that slavery is not the reason we do not obtain European recognition. The truth is, neither Europe nor the United States desire the abolition of slavery. It is indispensable to the commerce of the world. It