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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 18, 1865., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
The benevolent solicitude of the manufacturing and commercial men of England, for the continuance of the war in America, which was so agreeably relieved by intelligence of the successful resistance of Fort Fisher to Admiral Porter's first assault, must be once more painfully excited by the subsequent intelligence. The fall of Fort Fisher will be aggravated by the first news of the coming of a Peace Commission to Fortress Monroe. We could not wish our worst enemy more bitter pangs than those which are, perchance, while we write, torturing the hearts of the merchant princes of London and the lords of the loom in Manchester. War, with all its blessings,--as to English commerce and manufactures — is threatening to recede from the western horizon, and Peace, with all its horrors, darkening the sky. The probability that a hundred thousand men will not be killed in America this year, and a hundred thousand homes clothed in mourning, is enough to break their benevolent hearts. We d
Manchester (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 2
h was so agreeably relieved by intelligence of the successful resistance of Fort Fisher to Admiral Porter's first assault, must be once more painfully excited by the subsequent intelligence. The fall of Fort Fisher will be aggravated by the first news of the coming of a Peace Commission to Fortress Monroe. We could not wish our worst enemy more bitter pangs than those which are, perchance, while we write, torturing the hearts of the merchant princes of London and the lords of the loom in Manchester. War, with all its blessings,--as to English commerce and manufactures — is threatening to recede from the western horizon, and Peace, with all its horrors, darkening the sky. The probability that a hundred thousand men will not be killed in America this year, and a hundred thousand homes clothed in mourning, is enough to break their benevolent hearts. We doubt whether Palmerston or Russell will sleep a wink from the time they hear that a Peace Commission has started from Richmond till t
The benevolent solicitude of the manufacturing and commercial men of England, for the continuance of the war in America, which was so agreeably relieved by intelligence of the successful resistance of Fort Fisher to Admiral Porter's first assault, must be once more painfully excited by the subsequent intelligence. The fall of Fort Fisher will be aggravated by the first news of the coming of a Peace Commission to Fortress Monroe. We could not wish our worst enemy more bitter pangs than those which are, perchance, while we write, torturing the hearts of the merchant princes of London and the lords of the loom in Manchester. War, with all its blessings,--as to English commerce and manufactures — is threatening to recede from the western horizon, and Peace, with all its horrors, darkening the sky. The probability that a hundred thousand men will not be killed in America this year, and a hundred thousand homes clothed in mourning, is enough to break their benevolent hearts. We do
r years, is also brave, and her courage has given the English spectators special satisfaction. Fighting, bleeding, dying, sword in hand, and with a smile of stern defiance upon their lips, the conduct of our Confederate gladiators has drawn down Bravo after Bravo, and Encore after Encore, from all parts of the amphitheater. We have a right then to insist that, when England's turn comes, we shall not be swindled. We confess that we are not without some misgivings on the subject. Sidney SmithBravo, and Encore after Encore, from all parts of the amphitheater. We have a right then to insist that, when England's turn comes, we shall not be swindled. We confess that we are not without some misgivings on the subject. Sidney Smith once said: "As for the spirit of the peasantry, in making a gallant defence behind hedge-rows and through plate-racks and hen-coops, highly as I think of their bravery, I do not know any nation in Europe so likely to be struck with panic as the English; and this from their total unacquaintance with the science of war. Old wheat and beans blazing for twenty miles round; cart mares shot; sows of Lord Somerville's breed running wild over the country; the minister of the place wounded solely in hi
Palmerston (search for this): article 2
erchance, while we write, torturing the hearts of the merchant princes of London and the lords of the loom in Manchester. War, with all its blessings,--as to English commerce and manufactures — is threatening to recede from the western horizon, and Peace, with all its horrors, darkening the sky. The probability that a hundred thousand men will not be killed in America this year, and a hundred thousand homes clothed in mourning, is enough to break their benevolent hearts. We doubt whether Palmerston or Russell will sleep a wink from the time they hear that a Peace Commission has started from Richmond till they learn that it has ended in a perfect failure. What would become of them if every two weeks they could not announce that "Her Majesty's Government sees no reason to depart from the course of rigid neutrality which it marked out for itself at the beginning of these unhappy differences, and that the time for intervention has not yet arrived" ? We envy them the exquisite relie
le we write, torturing the hearts of the merchant princes of London and the lords of the loom in Manchester. War, with all its blessings,--as to English commerce and manufactures — is threatening to recede from the western horizon, and Peace, with all its horrors, darkening the sky. The probability that a hundred thousand men will not be killed in America this year, and a hundred thousand homes clothed in mourning, is enough to break their benevolent hearts. We doubt whether Palmerston or Russell will sleep a wink from the time they hear that a Peace Commission has started from Richmond till they learn that it has ended in a perfect failure. What would become of them if every two weeks they could not announce that "Her Majesty's Government sees no reason to depart from the course of rigid neutrality which it marked out for itself at the beginning of these unhappy differences, and that the time for intervention has not yet arrived" ? We envy them the exquisite relief of their a
Sidney Smith (search for this): article 2
own Bravo after Bravo, and Encore after Encore, from all parts of the amphitheater. We have a right then to insist that, when England's turn comes, we shall not be swindled. We confess that we are not without some misgivings on the subject. Sidney Smith once said: "As for the spirit of the peasantry, in making a gallant defence behind hedge-rows and through plate-racks and hen-coops, highly as I think of their bravery, I do not know any nation in Europe so likely to be struck with panic as thnglish behavior of these invaluable persons that I earnestly pray no opportunity may be given them for Roman valor, and for those very un-Roman pensions which they would all, of course, take especial care to claim in consequence." If the Rev. Sidney Smith is a true prophet, we shall never have half the fun out of England that she has had out of the Confederacy. Medicated with the drugs of a long peace, she will not be able to make even a respectable fight when the long,-dead lull of three