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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1865., [Electronic resource].

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lly establish for us a lasting, just and honorable peace and independence. And let us not forget to render unto His holy name the thanks and praise which are so justly due by His great goodness, and for the many mercies which He has extended to us amid the trials and sufferings of protracted and bloody war. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this my proclamation, appointing Friday, the 10th day of March next, as a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God," and I do earnestly invite all soldiers and citizens to observe the same in a spirit of reverence penitence and prayer. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States, at Richmond, this twenty-fifth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. Jefferson Davis. By the President: J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. ja 26--3tawtd
Jefferson Davis (search for this): article 1
orget to render unto His holy name the thanks and praise which are so justly due by His great goodness, and for the many mercies which He has extended to us amid the trials and sufferings of protracted and bloody war. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this my proclamation, appointing Friday, the 10th day of March next, as a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of A fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God," and I do earnestly invite all soldiers and citizens to observe the same in a spirit of reverence penitence and prayer. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States, at Richmond, this twenty-fifth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. Jefferson Davis. By the President: J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. ja 26--3tawtd
January 25th (search for this): article 1
lly establish for us a lasting, just and honorable peace and independence. And let us not forget to render unto His holy name the thanks and praise which are so justly due by His great goodness, and for the many mercies which He has extended to us amid the trials and sufferings of protracted and bloody war. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this my proclamation, appointing Friday, the 10th day of March next, as a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God," and I do earnestly invite all soldiers and citizens to observe the same in a spirit of reverence penitence and prayer. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States, at Richmond, this twenty-fifth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. Jefferson Davis. By the President: J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. ja 26--3tawtd
March 10th (search for this): article 1
ause into His own hand and mercifully establish for us a lasting, just and honorable peace and independence. And let us not forget to render unto His holy name the thanks and praise which are so justly due by His great goodness, and for the many mercies which He has extended to us amid the trials and sufferings of protracted and bloody war. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this my proclamation, appointing Friday, the 10th day of March next, as a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God," and I do earnestly invite all soldiers and citizens to observe the same in a spirit of reverence penitence and prayer. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States, at Richmond, this twenty-fifth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. Jefferson Davis. By the President: J. P. Benjamin, S
J. P. Benjamin (search for this): article 1
lly establish for us a lasting, just and honorable peace and independence. And let us not forget to render unto His holy name the thanks and praise which are so justly due by His great goodness, and for the many mercies which He has extended to us amid the trials and sufferings of protracted and bloody war. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this my proclamation, appointing Friday, the 10th day of March next, as a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God," and I do earnestly invite all soldiers and citizens to observe the same in a spirit of reverence penitence and prayer. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States, at Richmond, this twenty-fifth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. Jefferson Davis. By the President: J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. ja 26--3tawtd
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
anks and praise which are so justly due by His great goodness, and for the many mercies which He has extended to us amid the trials and sufferings of protracted and bloody war. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this my proclamation, appointing Friday, the 10th day of March next, as a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God," and I do earnestly invite a fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God," and I do earnestly invite all soldiers and citizens to observe the same in a spirit of reverence penitence and prayer. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States, at Richmond, this twenty-fifth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. Jefferson Davis. By the President: J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. ja 26--3tawtd
The jubilation of the enemy over the fall of the little city of Charleston (a place which would scarcely make a good-size ward of the city of New York), after a siege of four years, and an over-whelming preponderance of land and naval forces, is equal to that of the French when Napoleon, with thirty five thousand ragamuffins, whipped the whole of Europe. As the little Confederate bantam lies in the pit, "its back to the earth and its face to the sky, " the great, big, unconquerable roosters, gobblers, eagles, vultures, and birds of every race, who have at last brought down the game little chicken, rend the air with their triumphant cries. They crowd round the diminutive carcase, turn it over and rip it open to see what it has got in its crop, and generally agree that such a terrifically sublime achievement as the subjugation of that small bird was unparalleled in war. After this, let the Czar look to Cronstadt and England to Gibraltar. If it requires only four years to take C
Beauregard (search for this): article 1
he great and invincible fleets and armies of the all- conquering American nation? A Northern journal, somewhat envious of the glory which the diminutive seaport of Charleston has obtained, endeavors to detract from its merits by saying that the fortifications which have enabled it to hold out so long were originally constructed by the United States Government. If that were true, it does not much help the matter, for the strongest of those fortifications (Fort Sumter) was taken by General Beauregard in a few hours, whereas the United States required four years to retake it; and could not have taken it then, and never could have taken it, but for the evacuation of the city, in consequence of the unobstructed march of General Sherman through Georgia. And, after all, the Yankees taking Charleston, or taking Savannah, or taking any other city or section of the Southern Confederacy, is only doing, with a great amount of fuss and bloodshed, what they had done quietly and more effec
g that the fortifications which have enabled it to hold out so long were originally constructed by the United States Government. If that were true, it does not much help the matter, for the strongest of those fortifications (Fort Sumter) was taken by General Beauregard in a few hours, whereas the United States required four years to retake it; and could not have taken it then, and never could have taken it, but for the evacuation of the city, in consequence of the unobstructed march of General Sherman through Georgia. And, after all, the Yankees taking Charleston, or taking Savannah, or taking any other city or section of the Southern Confederacy, is only doing, with a great amount of fuss and bloodshed, what they had done quietly and more effectually before the war by the peaceful methods of trade and commerce. Not only Charleston, but the whole South, was taken a good many years ago, and to some purpose, when tariffs, coasting laws and bounties rendered every slaveholding Sta
Gibraltar (search for this): article 1
the sky, " the great, big, unconquerable roosters, gobblers, eagles, vultures, and birds of every race, who have at last brought down the game little chicken, rend the air with their triumphant cries. They crowd round the diminutive carcase, turn it over and rip it open to see what it has got in its crop, and generally agree that such a terrifically sublime achievement as the subjugation of that small bird was unparalleled in war. After this, let the Czar look to Cronstadt and England to Gibraltar. If it requires only four years to take Charleston, how long could any stronghold of Europe resist the great and invincible fleets and armies of the all- conquering American nation? A Northern journal, somewhat envious of the glory which the diminutive seaport of Charleston has obtained, endeavors to detract from its merits by saying that the fortifications which have enabled it to hold out so long were originally constructed by the United States Government. If that were true, it do
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