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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 3, 1865., [Electronic resource].

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lly establish for us a lasting, just and honorable peace and independence. And let us not forget to render unto His holy name the thanks and praise which are so justly due for His great goodness, and for the many mercies which He has extended to us amid the trials and sufferings of protracted and bloody war. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this my proclamation, appointing Friday, the 10th day of March next, as a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God;" and I do earnestly invite all soldiers and citizens to observe the same in a spirit of reverence penitence and prayer. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States, at Richmond, this twenty-fifth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. By the President: Jefferson Davis. J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. ja 26--3tawtd
Jefferson Davis (search for this): article 1
rget to render unto His holy name the thanks and praise which are so justly due for His great goodness, and for the many mercies which He has extended to us amid the trials and sufferings of protracted and bloody war. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this my proclamation, appointing Friday, the 10th day of March next, as a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Ac fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God;" and I do earnestly invite all soldiers and citizens to observe the same in a spirit of reverence penitence and prayer. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States, at Richmond, this twenty-fifth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. By the President: Jefferson Davis. J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. ja 26--3tawtd
January 25th (search for this): article 1
lly establish for us a lasting, just and honorable peace and independence. And let us not forget to render unto His holy name the thanks and praise which are so justly due for His great goodness, and for the many mercies which He has extended to us amid the trials and sufferings of protracted and bloody war. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this my proclamation, appointing Friday, the 10th day of March next, as a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God;" and I do earnestly invite all soldiers and citizens to observe the same in a spirit of reverence penitence and prayer. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States, at Richmond, this twenty-fifth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. By the President: Jefferson Davis. J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. ja 26--3tawtd
March 10th (search for this): article 1
use into His own hand and mercifully establish for us a lasting, just and honorable peace and independence. And let us not forget to render unto His holy name the thanks and praise which are so justly due for His great goodness, and for the many mercies which He has extended to us amid the trials and sufferings of protracted and bloody war. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this my proclamation, appointing Friday, the 10th day of March next, as a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God;" and I do earnestly invite all soldiers and citizens to observe the same in a spirit of reverence penitence and prayer. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States, at Richmond, this twenty-fifth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. By the President: Jefferson Davis. J. P. Benjamin, Se
J. P. Benjamin (search for this): article 1
lly establish for us a lasting, just and honorable peace and independence. And let us not forget to render unto His holy name the thanks and praise which are so justly due for His great goodness, and for the many mercies which He has extended to us amid the trials and sufferings of protracted and bloody war. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this my proclamation, appointing Friday, the 10th day of March next, as a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God;" and I do earnestly invite all soldiers and citizens to observe the same in a spirit of reverence penitence and prayer. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States, at Richmond, this twenty-fifth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. By the President: Jefferson Davis. J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. ja 26--3tawtd
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
nks and praise which are so justly due for His great goodness, and for the many mercies which He has extended to us amid the trials and sufferings of protracted and bloody war. Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do issue this my proclamation, appointing Friday, the 10th day of March next, as a day of public fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God;" and I do earnestly invite ac fasting, humiliation and prayer, (with thanksgiving,) for "invoking the favor and guidance of Almighty God;" and I do earnestly invite all soldiers and citizens to observe the same in a spirit of reverence penitence and prayer. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States, at Richmond, this twenty-fifth day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five. By the President: Jefferson Davis. J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. ja 26--3tawtd
Her Majesty with irreverence and ingratitude. It is obvious that all the pains taken to impress the United States with a sense of the obligations incurred by British neutrality are thrown away. We would like to learn, by the way, where all these foolish rumors of "recognition" come from. We have had them now for nearly four years. Almost every month in that time, one of them starts up and soars aloft; and no sooner is it fairly on the wing than that double-barrel shot-gun, Palmerston-Russell, brings it headlong to the earth. So far as we are concerned, it is a piece of refined cruelty to palm such stories upon the public. There is no more chance of British intervention — there never has been since the beginning of this quarrel — than there is of the intervention of the man in the moon. We have got along thus far without it, and expect to do so to the end of the chapter. A Government which has spent a great deal of time and money in getting up the American war is not going t
The London correspondent (February 11) of the New York Tribune says that no sick oysters could have opened more quietly than Parliament on its seventh and last session. Whether the consciousness of its impending dissolution affected its spirits, whether the members were under the influence of the weather, or whether they are reserving themselves for more appropriate opportunities, quien sabe? Pope's Goddess of Dullness was prevalent. Of all the barren Queen's speeches that ever were delivered — and that is saying a good deal --the last is probably the barrenest. We are interested in it (says the correspondent) only so far as it quietly scatters to the winds all the foolish rumors of "recognition"by the utterance of the cold word "neutrality "--which might be stereotyped for future use until there shall be no further occasion. We cannot understand how a speech can be considered "barren," in the United States, which contains that consoling assurance. The correspondent tr
Palmerston (search for this): article 2
nt treats Her Majesty with irreverence and ingratitude. It is obvious that all the pains taken to impress the United States with a sense of the obligations incurred by British neutrality are thrown away. We would like to learn, by the way, where all these foolish rumors of "recognition" come from. We have had them now for nearly four years. Almost every month in that time, one of them starts up and soars aloft; and no sooner is it fairly on the wing than that double-barrel shot-gun, Palmerston-Russell, brings it headlong to the earth. So far as we are concerned, it is a piece of refined cruelty to palm such stories upon the public. There is no more chance of British intervention — there never has been since the beginning of this quarrel — than there is of the intervention of the man in the moon. We have got along thus far without it, and expect to do so to the end of the chapter. A Government which has spent a great deal of time and money in getting up the American war is no
November, 2 AD (search for this): article 2
The London correspondent (February 11) of the New York Tribune says that no sick oysters could have opened more quietly than Parliament on its seventh and last session. Whether the consciousness of its impending dissolution affected its spirits, whether the members were under the influence of the weather, or whether they are reserving themselves for more appropriate opportunities, quien sabe? Pope's Goddess of Dullness was prevalent. Of all the barren Queen's speeches that ever were delivered — and that is saying a good deal --the last is probably the barrenest. We are interested in it (says the correspondent) only so far as it quietly scatters to the winds all the foolish rumors of "recognition"by the utterance of the cold word "neutrality "--which might be stereotyped for future use until there shall be no further occasion. We cannot understand how a speech can be considered "barren," in the United States, which contains that consoling assurance. The correspondent t
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