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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 11, 1865., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 1
fect that the Radicals in Congress would soon make a great show of magnanimity by admitting to their seats the representatives, first from Tennessee, second from Arkansas, and third from Virginia, provided those from the latter car take the test oath. I was inclined to doubt the truth of the report at first, but after investigati are three (so-called) Republican members from Tennessee, but they are no more Republican in their feelings than Andrew Johnson is. All of the three members from Arkansas, six of the members from Tennessee, and seven of the members from Virginia, are Democrats. If the whole nineteen members from the three States are admitted, sixass the Senate without amendment. There is no prospect, however, that any of the Southern members will be admitted this session, except those from Tennessee and Arkansas, and possibly those from Virginia. Of the same subject, the Washington Star says: The Republican members of the Senate yesterday were in caucus upon t
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
n make a great show of magnanimity by admitting to their seats the representatives, first from Tennessee, second from Arkansas, and third from Virginia, provided those from the latter car take the te their party, for it will be the reverse. There are three (so-called) Republican members from Tennessee, but they are no more Republican in their feelings than Andrew Johnson is. All of the three members from Arkansas, six of the members from Tennessee, and seven of the members from Virginia, are Democrats. If the whole nineteen members from the three States are admitted, sixteen will certainlct, however, that any of the Southern members will be admitted this session, except those from Tennessee and Arkansas, and possibly those from Virginia. Of the same subject, the Washington Star ued uninterruptedly, without intermission. What is recognized as Virginia was even before Tennessee in the abolition of slavery and the adoption of the constitutional amendment, and in the acts
Doolittle (search for this): article 1
hree with the Radicals. The strength of parties in the House will then be: Radicals, 142; Democrats and Conservatives, 52. Your readers can see that the Radicals run no risk in the admission of the representatives from these three States. They will still retain an overwhelming majority, although the Democrats will receive a large accession to their numbers. Thaddeus Stevens's resolution will meet with decided opposition in the Senate. It is understood that Reverdy Johnson and Senator Doolittle will make strong arguments against it. The most strenuous efforts will be made to amend it, and faint hopes begin to be entertained that it may not pass the Senate without amendment. There is no prospect, however, that any of the Southern members will be admitted this session, except those from Tennessee and Arkansas, and possibly those from Virginia. Of the same subject, the Washington Star says: The Republican members of the Senate yesterday were in caucus upon the resolu
Andrew Johnson (search for this): article 1
Arkansas, and third from Virginia, provided those from the latter car take the test oath. I was inclined to doubt the truth of the report at first, but after investigation I believe it is well founded. What the object in view can be does not yet appear. It cannot be that the Radicals look upon it as an accession of strength to their party, for it will be the reverse. There are three (so-called) Republican members from Tennessee, but they are no more Republican in their feelings than Andrew Johnson is. All of the three members from Arkansas, six of the members from Tennessee, and seven of the members from Virginia, are Democrats. If the whole nineteen members from the three States are admitted, sixteen will certainly vote with the Democrats, and only three with the Radicals. The strength of parties in the House will then be: Radicals, 142; Democrats and Conservatives, 52. Your readers can see that the Radicals run no risk in the admission of the representatives from these three
Underwood (search for this): article 1
ity at the outset; and these relations with the Federal Government have never been suspended, but have continued uninterruptedly, without intermission. What is recognized as Virginia was even before Tennessee in the abolition of slavery and the adoption of the constitutional amendment, and in the acts of repudiating the rebel debt and of declaring the ordinances of secession to be null and void. The Alexandria Legislature was entirely loyal. The Senators elect, Messrs. Segar and Underwood, are everywhere recognized as loyal; the Governor of Virginia, regularly elected, is of indisputable loyalty; and we can recognize no technicality which, under radical reasoning, should exclude Virginia even for an instant on the score of the loyalty of the State, since it first unfurled the flag of the Union in a community of armed and defiant secessionists. We are becoming more and more sanguine that it is out of the power of politicians (even if they shall see fit to manifest a str
s a loyal community at the outset; and these relations with the Federal Government have never been suspended, but have continued uninterruptedly, without intermission. What is recognized as Virginia was even before Tennessee in the abolition of slavery and the adoption of the constitutional amendment, and in the acts of repudiating the rebel debt and of declaring the ordinances of secession to be null and void. The Alexandria Legislature was entirely loyal. The Senators elect, Messrs. Segar and Underwood, are everywhere recognized as loyal; the Governor of Virginia, regularly elected, is of indisputable loyalty; and we can recognize no technicality which, under radical reasoning, should exclude Virginia even for an instant on the score of the loyalty of the State, since it first unfurled the flag of the Union in a community of armed and defiant secessionists. We are becoming more and more sanguine that it is out of the power of politicians (even if they shall see fit t
Reverdy Johnson (search for this): article 1
Democrats, and only three with the Radicals. The strength of parties in the House will then be: Radicals, 142; Democrats and Conservatives, 52. Your readers can see that the Radicals run no risk in the admission of the representatives from these three States. They will still retain an overwhelming majority, although the Democrats will receive a large accession to their numbers. Thaddeus Stevens's resolution will meet with decided opposition in the Senate. It is understood that Reverdy Johnson and Senator Doolittle will make strong arguments against it. The most strenuous efforts will be made to amend it, and faint hopes begin to be entertained that it may not pass the Senate without amendment. There is no prospect, however, that any of the Southern members will be admitted this session, except those from Tennessee and Arkansas, and possibly those from Virginia. Of the same subject, the Washington Star says: The Republican members of the Senate yesterday were in c
Thaddeus Stevens (search for this): article 1
ur readers can see that the Radicals run no risk in the admission of the representatives from these three States. They will still retain an overwhelming majority, although the Democrats will receive a large accession to their numbers. Thaddeus Stevens's resolution will meet with decided opposition in the Senate. It is understood that Reverdy Johnson and Senator Doolittle will make strong arguments against it. The most strenuous efforts will be made to amend it, and faint hopes begin to bitted this session, except those from Tennessee and Arkansas, and possibly those from Virginia. Of the same subject, the Washington Star says: The Republican members of the Senate yesterday were in caucus upon the resolutions of Mr. Thaddeus Stevens relating to reconstruction. They are not likely to pass that body without important amendments. It is reported that prominent Republicans in both Houses favor the admission of the Tennessee delegation. The Washington correspond
August, 12 AD (search for this): article 1
Admission of Southern Representatives. The Washington correspondent of the New York News, under date of December 8th, says: There was a report yesterday to the effect that the Radicals in Congress would soon make a great show of magnanimity by admitting to their seats the representatives, first from Tennessee, second from Arkansas, and third from Virginia, provided those from the latter car take the test oath. I was inclined to doubt the truth of the report at first, but after investigation I believe it is well founded. What the object in view can be does not yet appear. It cannot be that the Radicals look upon it as an accession of strength to their party, for it will be the reverse. There are three (so-called) Republican members from Tennessee, but they are no more Republican in their feelings than Andrew Johnson is. All of the three members from Arkansas, six of the members from Tennessee, and seven of the members from Virginia, are Democrats. If the whole nineteen