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R. M. T. Hunter (search for this): article 11
Senator Hunter become a tariff man. --Forney, in a late letter to his Press, says: "I learn from a gentleman who had a recent conversation with R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia,--one of the leading free-traders and authors of the rebellion — that he frankly admits that the American policy must be a protective one for many years to come, and that the South is directly interested in having it so." Senator Hunter become a tariff man. --Forney, in a late letter to his Press, says: "I learn from a gentleman who had a recent conversation with R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia,--one of the leading free-traders and authors of the rebellion — that he frankly admits that the American policy must be a protective one for many years to come, and that the South is directly interested in having it so.
Senator Hunter become a tariff man. --Forney, in a late letter to his Press, says: "I learn from a gentleman who had a recent conversation with R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia,--one of the leading free-traders and authors of the rebellion — that he frankly admits that the American policy must be a protective one for many years to come, and that the South is directly interested in having it so."