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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1865., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 25 total hits in 5 results.

Belgium (Belgium) (search for this): article 4
The demise of the King of Belgium has given rise to some interesting speculations as to its political consequence. The Paris correspondent of the London Herald says that public opinion in BelBelgium is greatly excited at articles that have appeared in certain French semi-official prints, which, after dwelling on some riotous scenes at the Students' Congress at Liege, and at a couple of stortings in the Chamber of Representatives, hinted that it might be necessary to "save society" in Belgium. One of the Belgium newspapers publishes three columns to show that "society" and liberty in BBelgium are perfectly able to save themselves. There are many people, both in England and France, who believe that England would not do anything but protest were the Emperor to "save society" in BelgBelgium by annexing that country, and that the assent of Count Von Bismark, of Prussia, to such a plan has been secured beforehand. We do not attach much importance to these conjectures. The Paris lett
Leodium (Belgium) (search for this): article 4
The demise of the King of Belgium has given rise to some interesting speculations as to its political consequence. The Paris correspondent of the London Herald says that public opinion in Belgium is greatly excited at articles that have appeared in certain French semi-official prints, which, after dwelling on some riotous scenes at the Students' Congress at Liege, and at a couple of stormy sittings in the Chamber of Representatives, hinted that it might be necessary to "save society" in Belgium. One of the Belgium newspapers publishes three columns to show that "society" and liberty in Belgium are perfectly able to save themselves. There are many people, both in England and France, who believe that England would not do anything but protest were the Emperor to "save society" in Belgium by annexing that country, and that the assent of Count Von Bismark, of Prussia, to such a plan has been secured beforehand. We do not attach much importance to these conjectures. The Paris le
France (France) (search for this): article 4
The Paris correspondent of the London Herald says that public opinion in Belgium is greatly excited at articles that have appeared in certain French semi-official prints, which, after dwelling on some riotous scenes at the Students' Congress at Liege, and at a couple of stormy sittings in the Chamber of Representatives, hinted that it might be necessary to "save society" in Belgium. One of the Belgium newspapers publishes three columns to show that "society" and liberty in Belgium are perfectly able to save themselves. There are many people, both in England and France, who believe that England would not do anything but protest were the Emperor to "save society" in Belgium by annexing that country, and that the assent of Count Von Bismark, of Prussia, to such a plan has been secured beforehand. We do not attach much importance to these conjectures. The Paris letter-writers are eminently sensational personages, and know more of the councils of princes than the members of cabinets.
The Paris correspondent of the London Herald says that public opinion in Belgium is greatly excited at articles that have appeared in certain French semi-official prints, which, after dwelling on some riotous scenes at the Students' Congress at Liege, and at a couple of stormy sittings in the Chamber of Representatives, hinted that it might be necessary to "save society" in Belgium. One of the Belgium newspapers publishes three columns to show that "society" and liberty in Belgium are perfectly able to save themselves. There are many people, both in England and France, who believe that England would not do anything but protest were the Emperor to "save society" in Belgium by annexing that country, and that the assent of Count Von Bismark, of Prussia, to such a plan has been secured beforehand. We do not attach much importance to these conjectures. The Paris letter-writers are eminently sensational personages, and know more of the councils of princes than the members of cabinets.
The Paris correspondent of the London Herald says that public opinion in Belgium is greatly excited at articles that have appeared in certain French semi-official prints, which, after dwelling on some riotous scenes at the Students' Congress at Liege, and at a couple of stormy sittings in the Chamber of Representatives, hinted that it might be necessary to "save society" in Belgium. One of the Belgium newspapers publishes three columns to show that "society" and liberty in Belgium are perfectly able to save themselves. There are many people, both in England and France, who believe that England would not do anything but protest were the Emperor to "save society" in Belgium by annexing that country, and that the assent of Count Von Bismark, of Prussia, to such a plan has been secured beforehand. We do not attach much importance to these conjectures. The Paris letter-writers are eminently sensational personages, and know more of the councils of princes than the members of cabinets.