hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 34 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 16 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Mary Johnson 12 0 Browse Search
Weith 12 12 Browse Search
Hugh W. Mercer 11 1 Browse Search
Belgium (Belgium) 10 0 Browse Search
W. H. Seward 10 0 Browse Search
Grant 10 8 Browse Search
France (France) 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1865., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 14 total hits in 11 results.

1 2
Donelson (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 6
multitude of routed, beaten, discomfited men, whose valor has almost atoned for the sins of rebellion!" "Our gallant grey brothers are even now clamoring around Washington," &c. "So with the Generals of the Rebellion. The greatest of them all is now a teacher of mathematics in a university. Sherman's great antagonists are in the express and railroad business. The once-dreaded Beauregard will sell you a ticket from New Orleans to Jackson; and, if you want to send a couple of hams to a friend in Richmond, Joe Johnston, once commander of great armies, will carry them. The man whose works Grant moved upon at Donelson edits an indifferent newspaper in New Orleans, while the Commander of the Rebel cavalry at Corinth is his local reporter. Marshall practices law in New Orleans; Forrest is running a saw-mill; Dick Taylor is now having a good time in New York; Roger A. Pryor is a daily practitioner at our courts; and so with the rest of this bold, vindictive and ambitious race of men."
Greeley in a good Humor. The New York Tribune has a Christmas article congratulating the country upon the peaceful manner in which the heroes of the war (on either side) have betaken themselves to the ordinary pursuits of life. The allusions to the Southern soldiers speak well for Mr. Greeley's liberality of feeling. Here are some of them: "Look at that vast multitude of routed, beaten, discomfited men, whose valor has almost atoned for the sins of rebellion!" "Our gallant grey brMr. Greeley's liberality of feeling. Here are some of them: "Look at that vast multitude of routed, beaten, discomfited men, whose valor has almost atoned for the sins of rebellion!" "Our gallant grey brothers are even now clamoring around Washington," &c. "So with the Generals of the Rebellion. The greatest of them all is now a teacher of mathematics in a university. Sherman's great antagonists are in the express and railroad business. The once-dreaded Beauregard will sell you a ticket from New Orleans to Jackson; and, if you want to send a couple of hams to a friend in Richmond, Joe Johnston, once commander of great armies, will carry them. The man whose works Grant moved upon at Donelso
Dick Taylor (search for this): article 6
multitude of routed, beaten, discomfited men, whose valor has almost atoned for the sins of rebellion!" "Our gallant grey brothers are even now clamoring around Washington," &c. "So with the Generals of the Rebellion. The greatest of them all is now a teacher of mathematics in a university. Sherman's great antagonists are in the express and railroad business. The once-dreaded Beauregard will sell you a ticket from New Orleans to Jackson; and, if you want to send a couple of hams to a friend in Richmond, Joe Johnston, once commander of great armies, will carry them. The man whose works Grant moved upon at Donelson edits an indifferent newspaper in New Orleans, while the Commander of the Rebel cavalry at Corinth is his local reporter. Marshall practices law in New Orleans; Forrest is running a saw-mill; Dick Taylor is now having a good time in New York; Roger A. Pryor is a daily practitioner at our courts; and so with the rest of this bold, vindictive and ambitious race of men."
Roger A. Pryor (search for this): article 6
multitude of routed, beaten, discomfited men, whose valor has almost atoned for the sins of rebellion!" "Our gallant grey brothers are even now clamoring around Washington," &c. "So with the Generals of the Rebellion. The greatest of them all is now a teacher of mathematics in a university. Sherman's great antagonists are in the express and railroad business. The once-dreaded Beauregard will sell you a ticket from New Orleans to Jackson; and, if you want to send a couple of hams to a friend in Richmond, Joe Johnston, once commander of great armies, will carry them. The man whose works Grant moved upon at Donelson edits an indifferent newspaper in New Orleans, while the Commander of the Rebel cavalry at Corinth is his local reporter. Marshall practices law in New Orleans; Forrest is running a saw-mill; Dick Taylor is now having a good time in New York; Roger A. Pryor is a daily practitioner at our courts; and so with the rest of this bold, vindictive and ambitious race of men."
multitude of routed, beaten, discomfited men, whose valor has almost atoned for the sins of rebellion!" "Our gallant grey brothers are even now clamoring around Washington," &c. "So with the Generals of the Rebellion. The greatest of them all is now a teacher of mathematics in a university. Sherman's great antagonists are in the express and railroad business. The once-dreaded Beauregard will sell you a ticket from New Orleans to Jackson; and, if you want to send a couple of hams to a friend in Richmond, Joe Johnston, once commander of great armies, will carry them. The man whose works Grant moved upon at Donelson edits an indifferent newspaper in New Orleans, while the Commander of the Rebel cavalry at Corinth is his local reporter. Marshall practices law in New Orleans; Forrest is running a saw-mill; Dick Taylor is now having a good time in New York; Roger A. Pryor is a daily practitioner at our courts; and so with the rest of this bold, vindictive and ambitious race of men."
Joe Johnston (search for this): article 6
multitude of routed, beaten, discomfited men, whose valor has almost atoned for the sins of rebellion!" "Our gallant grey brothers are even now clamoring around Washington," &c. "So with the Generals of the Rebellion. The greatest of them all is now a teacher of mathematics in a university. Sherman's great antagonists are in the express and railroad business. The once-dreaded Beauregard will sell you a ticket from New Orleans to Jackson; and, if you want to send a couple of hams to a friend in Richmond, Joe Johnston, once commander of great armies, will carry them. The man whose works Grant moved upon at Donelson edits an indifferent newspaper in New Orleans, while the Commander of the Rebel cavalry at Corinth is his local reporter. Marshall practices law in New Orleans; Forrest is running a saw-mill; Dick Taylor is now having a good time in New York; Roger A. Pryor is a daily practitioner at our courts; and so with the rest of this bold, vindictive and ambitious race of men."
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): article 6
f feeling. Here are some of them: "Look at that vast multitude of routed, beaten, discomfited men, whose valor has almost atoned for the sins of rebellion!" "Our gallant grey brothers are even now clamoring around Washington," &c. "So with the Generals of the Rebellion. The greatest of them all is now a teacher of mathematics in a university. Sherman's great antagonists are in the express and railroad business. The once-dreaded Beauregard will sell you a ticket from New Orleans to Jackson; and, if you want to send a couple of hams to a friend in Richmond, Joe Johnston, once commander of great armies, will carry them. The man whose works Grant moved upon at Donelson edits an indifferent newspaper in New Orleans, while the Commander of the Rebel cavalry at Corinth is his local reporter. Marshall practices law in New Orleans; Forrest is running a saw-mill; Dick Taylor is now having a good time in New York; Roger A. Pryor is a daily practitioner at our courts; and so with the
multitude of routed, beaten, discomfited men, whose valor has almost atoned for the sins of rebellion!" "Our gallant grey brothers are even now clamoring around Washington," &c. "So with the Generals of the Rebellion. The greatest of them all is now a teacher of mathematics in a university. Sherman's great antagonists are in the express and railroad business. The once-dreaded Beauregard will sell you a ticket from New Orleans to Jackson; and, if you want to send a couple of hams to a friend in Richmond, Joe Johnston, once commander of great armies, will carry them. The man whose works Grant moved upon at Donelson edits an indifferent newspaper in New Orleans, while the Commander of the Rebel cavalry at Corinth is his local reporter. Marshall practices law in New Orleans; Forrest is running a saw-mill; Dick Taylor is now having a good time in New York; Roger A. Pryor is a daily practitioner at our courts; and so with the rest of this bold, vindictive and ambitious race of men."
e) have betaken themselves to the ordinary pursuits of life. The allusions to the Southern soldiers speak well for Mr. Greeley's liberality of feeling. Here are some of them: "Look at that vast multitude of routed, beaten, discomfited men, whose valor has almost atoned for the sins of rebellion!" "Our gallant grey brothers are even now clamoring around Washington," &c. "So with the Generals of the Rebellion. The greatest of them all is now a teacher of mathematics in a university. Sherman's great antagonists are in the express and railroad business. The once-dreaded Beauregard will sell you a ticket from New Orleans to Jackson; and, if you want to send a couple of hams to a friend in Richmond, Joe Johnston, once commander of great armies, will carry them. The man whose works Grant moved upon at Donelson edits an indifferent newspaper in New Orleans, while the Commander of the Rebel cavalry at Corinth is his local reporter. Marshall practices law in New Orleans; Forrest is
Beauregard (search for this): article 6
rn soldiers speak well for Mr. Greeley's liberality of feeling. Here are some of them: "Look at that vast multitude of routed, beaten, discomfited men, whose valor has almost atoned for the sins of rebellion!" "Our gallant grey brothers are even now clamoring around Washington," &c. "So with the Generals of the Rebellion. The greatest of them all is now a teacher of mathematics in a university. Sherman's great antagonists are in the express and railroad business. The once-dreaded Beauregard will sell you a ticket from New Orleans to Jackson; and, if you want to send a couple of hams to a friend in Richmond, Joe Johnston, once commander of great armies, will carry them. The man whose works Grant moved upon at Donelson edits an indifferent newspaper in New Orleans, while the Commander of the Rebel cavalry at Corinth is his local reporter. Marshall practices law in New Orleans; Forrest is running a saw-mill; Dick Taylor is now having a good time in New York; Roger A. Pryor is
1 2