hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Tiberius (New Mexico, United States) 54 0 Browse Search
Tiberius (New Mexico, United States) 46 0 Browse Search
Livia (Kentucky, United States) 24 0 Browse Search
Capri (Italy) 20 0 Browse Search
Tiber (Italy) 18 0 Browse Search
Rhodes (Greece) 16 0 Browse Search
Ostia (Italy) 16 0 Browse Search
Asia 16 0 Browse Search
Campania (Italy) 16 0 Browse Search
Nero (Ohio, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson).

Found 3,663 total hits in 1,021 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
Apollonia (Libya) (search for this): life aug., chapter 87
He was no less fond of the Greek literature, in which he made considerable proficiency; having had Apollodorus of Pergamus, for his master in rhetoric; whom. though much advanced in years, he took with him from The City, when he was himself very young, to Apollonia. Afterwards, being instructed in philology by Sephaerus, he received into his family Areus the philosopher, and his sons Dionysius and Nicanor; but he never could speak the Greek tongue readily, nor ever ventured to compose in it. For if there was occasion for him to deliver his sentiments in that language, he always expressed what he had to say in Latin, and gave it another to translate. He was evidently not unacquainted with the poetry of the Greeks, and had a great taste for the ancient comedy, which he often brought upon-the stage, in his public spectacles. In reading the Greek and Latin authors, he paid particular attention to precepts and examples which might be useful in public or private life. Those he used to extr
He conducted in person only two foreign wars; the Dalmatian, whilst he was yet but a youth; and, after Antony's final defeat, the Cantabrian. He was wounded in the former of these wars; in one battle he received a contusion in the right knee from a stone, and in another, he was much hurt in one leg and both arms, by the fall of a bridge.Not a bridge over a river, but a military engine used for gaining admittance into a fortress. His other wars he carried on by his lieutenants; but occasionally visited the army, in some of the wars of Pannonia and Germany, or remained at no great distance, proceeding from Rome as far as Ravenna, Milan, or Aquileia.
however, no attempt upon the sovereignty though his friends were very ready to support him, and even pressed him to the enterprise untl he was encouraged to it by the fortuitous aid of persons unknown to him and at a distance. Two thousand men, drawn out of three legions in the Moesian army, had been sent to the assistance of Otho. While they were upon their march, news came that he had been defeated, and had put an end to his life; notwithstanding which they continued their march as far as Aquileia, pretending that they gave no credit to the report. There, tempted by the opportunity which the disorder of the times afforded them, they ravaged and plundered the country at discretion; until at length, fearing to be called to an account on their return, and punished for it, they resolved upon choosing and creating an emperor. "For they were no ways inferior," they said, "to the army which made Galba emperor, nor to the praetorian troops which had set up Otho, nor the army in Germany, to w
by Atia, who was the daughter of Marcus Atius Balbus, and Julia, sister to Caius Julius Caesar. Balbus was, by the father's side, of a family who were natives of Aricia,Now Laricia, or Riccia, a town of the Campagna di Roma. on the Appian Way, about ten miles from Rome. and many of whom had been in the senate. By the mother's sidscent even by the mother's side, says that his great grand-father was of African descent, and at one time kept a perfumer's shop, and at another, a bake-house, in Aricia. And Cassius of Parma, in a letter, taxes Augustus with being the son not only of a baker, but a usurer. These are his words: "Thou art a lump of thy mother's mearicia. And Cassius of Parma, in a letter, taxes Augustus with being the son not only of a baker, but a usurer. These are his words: "Thou art a lump of thy mother's meal, which a money-changer of Nerulum taking from the newest bake-house of Aricia, kneaded into some shape, with his hands all discoloured by the fingering of money."
He first inhabited a small house in the Suburra,The Suburra lay between the Celian and Esquiline hills. It was one of the most frequented quarters of Rome. but after his advancement to the pontificate, he occupied a palace belonging to the state in the Via Sacra. Many writers say that he liked his residence to be elegant, and his entertainments sumptuous; and that he entirely took down a villa near the grove of Aricia, Which he had built from the foundation and finished at a vast expense, because it did not exactly suit his taste, although he had at that time but slender means, and was in debt; and that he carried about in his expeditions tesselated and marble slabs for the floor of his tent.
ing it by private enterprise, principally for the sake of the valuable remains of art which it is supposed to contain. To render the approaches to the city more commodious, he took upon himself the charge of repairing the Flaminian way as far as Ariminum, The Via Flaminia was probably undertaken by the censor Caius Flaminius, and finished by his son of the same name, who was consul A.U.C. 566, and employed his soldiers in forming it after subduing the Ligurians. It led from the Flumentan gate, now the Porta del Popolo, through Etruria and Umbria into the Cisalpine Gaul, ending at Ariminum, the frontier town of the territories of the republic, now Rimini, on the Adriatic; and is travelled by every tourist who takes the route, north of the Appenines, through the States of the Church, to Rome. Every one knows that the great highways, not only in Italy but in the provinces, were among the most magnificent and enduring works of the Roman people. and distributed the repairs of the other roa
ithout entering it, having only taken a view of the walls at a distance. For what reason he did not disembark in his first excursion, is uncertain; but in the last, he was deterred from entering the city by a prodigy. He was in the habit of diverting himself with a snake, and upon going to feed it with his own hand, according to custom, he found it devoured by ants: from which he was advised to beware of the fury of the mob. On this account, returning in all haste to Campania, he fell ill at Astura ; A small town on the coast of Latium, and the present Nettuno. It was here that Cicero was slain by the satellites of Antony. but recovering a little, went on to Circeii. A town on a promontory of the same dreary coast, between Antium and Terracina, built on a promontory surrounded by the sea and the marsh still called Circello. And to obviate any suspicion of his being in a bad state of health, he was not only present at the sports in the camp, but encountered, with javelins, a wild boar
veral persons who applied to him respecting causes they had depending, he cried out, (and it was afterwards regarded as an omen of his death), "Not all the business in the world, shall detain me at Rome one moment longer;" and setting out upon his journey, he went as far as Astura; Astura stood not far from Terracina, on the road to Naples. Augustus embarked there for the islands lying off that coast. whence, contrary to his custom, he put to sea in the nighttime, as there was a favourable wind.veral persons who applied to him respecting causes they had depending, he cried out, (and it was afterwards regarded as an omen of his death), "Not all the business in the world, shall detain me at Rome one moment longer;" and setting out upon his journey, he went as far as Astura; Astura stood not far from Terracina, on the road to Naples. Augustus embarked there for the islands lying off that coast. whence, contrary to his custom, he put to sea in the nighttime, as there was a favourable wind.
ian stairs. This roused the people to a still greater abhorrence of the tyrant's memory, since his cruelty continued in use even after he was dead. As soon as his corpse was begun to be moved from Misenum, many cried out for its being carried to Atella, Atella, a town between Capua and Naples, now called San Arpino, where there was an amphitheatre. The people seem to have raised the shout in derision, referring, perhaps, to the Atellan fables, mentioned in c. xiv.; and in their fury they proposor its being carried to Atella, Atella, a town between Capua and Naples, now called San Arpino, where there was an amphitheatre. The people seem to have raised the shout in derision, referring, perhaps, to the Atellan fables, mentioned in c. xiv.; and in their fury they proposed that his body should only be grilled, as those of malefactors were, instead of being reduced to ashes. and being half burnt there in the amphitheatre. It was, however, brought to Rome, and burnt with the usual ceremony.
gustus, he utterly abolished among the Gauls.Pliny tells us that Druidism had its origin in Gaul, and was trnsplanted into Britain, xxi. 1. Julius Caesar asserts just the contrary, Bell. Gall. vi.13.11. The edict of Claudius was not carried into effect; at least, we find vestiges of Druidism in Gaul, during the reigns of Nero and Alexander Severus. On the other hand, he attempted to transfer the Eleusinian mysteries from Attica to Rome.The Eleusinian mysteries were never transferred from Athens to Rome, notwithstanding this attempt of Claudius, and although Aurelius Victor says that Adrian effected it. He likewise ordered the temple of Venus Erycina in Sicily, which was old and in a ruinous condition, to be repaired at the expense of the Roman people. He concluded treateis with foreign princes in the forum, with the sacrifice of a sow and the form of words used by the heralds in former times. But in these and other thigns, and indeed the greater part of his administration, he wa
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...