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Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 22
case in regard to that all-important element of an army's success-field transportation. The troops under General Polk's command were chiefly the State troops transferred by Tennessee to the Confederate service — the equivalent of about ten regiments of all arms, with 3,000 muskets, and a brigade of Mississippians under Brigadier-General Charles Clark. Polk had taken command on July 13th, and, two weeks after, sent General Pillow with 6,000 men to New Madrid, on the right bank of the Mississippi. This point was important, because its occupation prevented any movement by the enemy on Pocahontas, by the way of Chalk Bluffs. While it was expected to make the campaign in Tennessee defensive, the intention was to carry on active operations in Missouri by a combined movement of the armies of Price, McCulloch, Hardee, and Pillow, aided by Jeff Thompson's irregular command. It has already been seen that this plan failed through want of cooperation. Both Generals Polk and Pillow felt
George H. Thomas (search for this): chapter 22
and a bold, aggressive spirit, every inch a soldier. General Polk's great services, his close public and private relations with the subject of this memoir, his anomalous position as bishop and general, and the wide misapprehension of his life and character by those who knew only one side or the other, warrant a more extended notice. Leonidas Polk was descended from a family noted in our Revolutionary annals. It came from the north of Ireland about 1722, to Maryland; and about 1753, Thomas, the son of William Polk, found a congenial home in the Scotch-Irish settlement of Mecklenburg County, in the province of North Carolina. Here he married and prospered, attaining wealth and eminence among his people. It may be recollected that for Mecklenburg County is claimed the honor of making the first Declaration of Independence from the mother-country. According to the historian of these events, Colonel Thomas Polk convoked the meeting that took this first step in treason. He was a
Jeff Thompson (search for this): chapter 22
Polk had taken command on July 13th, and, two weeks after, sent General Pillow with 6,000 men to New Madrid, on the right bank of the Mississippi. This point was important, because its occupation prevented any movement by the enemy on Pocahontas, by the way of Chalk Bluffs. While it was expected to make the campaign in Tennessee defensive, the intention was to carry on active operations in Missouri by a combined movement of the armies of Price, McCulloch, Hardee, and Pillow, aided by Jeff Thompson's irregular command. It has already been seen that this plan failed through want of cooperation. Both Generals Polk and Pillow felt the pressing necessity for the occupation of Columbus, and on August 28th Pillow wrote to Polk urging its immediate seizure. This had been Polk's own view for some time, but orders from the War Department had restrained him. It was only, therefore, when an hour's delay might have proved fatal, and when it was too late to prevent the seizure of Paducah by
Washington (search for this): chapter 22
endship was founded upon mutual esteem. When General Polk came from Europe, he brought with him a beautiful onyx cameo — the head of Washington — which he gave to General Johnston on his return, saying: I could find nothing so appropriate as a present for you; for I have never known any one whose character so closely resembled Washington's in all respects as your own. A very dear friend confirms this view of General Johnston thus: Did you ever see Jefferson's estimate of the character of Washington? It is better than the best for General Johnston. When General Polk took command in West Tennessee, his department extended from the mouth of the Arkansas River, on both sides of the Mississippi, to the northern limits of Confederate authority, and east as far as the Mobile & Ohio Railroad. For the following account of his services, previous to General Johnston's arrival, I am again indebted to Dr. William M. Polk: The force which he found in his command was mainly composed of
Napoleon Westerburg (search for this): chapter 22
n of stately but winning courtesy, although occasionally indulging in pleasantry. At present I can recall but two of those conversations. One evening we received a St. Louis paper containing a general order of General Fremont, announcing his staff — a numerous body, composed largely of gentlemen with foreign names. As, for instance, General Asboth, Colonel De Alma, Majors Kappner and Blome, Captains Emavic Meizaras, Kalmanuezze, Zagonyi, Vanstein Kiste, Sacche, and Geister, Lieutenants Napoleon Westerburg, Addone, Kroger, etc. After the list was read over to him, the general, with an expressive smile, remarked, There is too much tail to that kite. I believe the United States Government soon afterward came to the same conclusion. On another evening, some of his staff were discussing the question of the probable boundary-line of the Confederate States, in the final treaty of peace; none then doubted their achievement of independence. The general's opinion being requested, he ans
ery highest opinion of his profound judgment. He was a man of stately but winning courtesy, although occasionally indulging in pleasantry. At present I can recall but two of those conversations. One evening we received a St. Louis paper containing a general order of General Fremont, announcing his staff — a numerous body, composed largely of gentlemen with foreign names. As, for instance, General Asboth, Colonel De Alma, Majors Kappner and Blome, Captains Emavic Meizaras, Kalmanuezze, Zagonyi, Vanstein Kiste, Sacche, and Geister, Lieutenants Napoleon Westerburg, Addone, Kroger, etc. After the list was read over to him, the general, with an expressive smile, remarked, There is too much tail to that kite. I believe the United States Government soon afterward came to the same conclusion. On another evening, some of his staff were discussing the question of the probable boundary-line of the Confederate States, in the final treaty of peace; none then doubted their achievement of in
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