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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. Search the whole document.

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fter tea with his immediate staff, and his conversations in those social reunions gave me the very highest opinion of his profound judgment. He was a man of stately but winning courtesy, although occasionally indulging in pleasantry. At present I can recall but two of those conversations. One evening we received a St. Louis paper containing a general order of General Fremont, announcing his staff — a numerous body, composed largely of gentlemen with foreign names. As, for instance, General Asboth, Colonel De Alma, Majors Kappner and Blome, Captains Emavic Meizaras, Kalmanuezze, Zagonyi, Vanstein Kiste, Sacche, and Geister, Lieutenants Napoleon Westerburg, Addone, Kroger, etc. After the list was read over to him, the general, with an expressive smile, remarked, There is too much tail to that kite. I believe the United States Government soon afterward came to the same conclusion. On another evening, some of his staff were discussing the question of the probable boundary-line of t
nd thus disturbing the pretended neutrality of Kentucky. The Secretary of War and Governor Harris both remonstrated; but President Davis replied to his explanations, Necessity justifies your action. Polk was rapidly fortifying, when General Johnston arrived at Columbus. About this time, September 10th, Grant wrote to Fremont, proposing to attack Columbus, which, under the circumstances, seems to the writer judicious though apparently bold; but Fremont took no notice of his application. Badeau's Life of Grant, vol. i., p. 13. After the failure of the campaign projected against St. Louis, in the summer of 1861, General Polk turned his attention toward perfecting the river-defenses. Missouri and Arkansas were added to his department, but he was unable to avail himself of these increased powers, as the defense of the Mississippi was his main object, and occupied all his resources. Dr. Polk says : Finding in Island No.10 a most advantageous position, works were begun ther
A Federal gunboat commenced shelling the fortifications we were erecting on the high bluff immediately north of the town. That shelling continued only about an hour. During all of it he and his immediate staff remained near the battery of Captain Bankhead, which from the bluff was answering the fire of the gunboat. We stood close by the battery; and, after a shell had exploded near to it, Captain Bankhead came up to the general and remarked to him that the gunboat was evidently getting its rCaptain Bankhead came up to the general and remarked to him that the gunboat was evidently getting its range, and he should not expose his person needlessly. The general very calmly answered, Captain, we must all take our risks. Afterward, the manner of his death at Shiloh impressed the incident permanently on my memory. But, in fact, his conduct on that occasion was not rash, but wise. He doubtless was aware of that defect of new troops (to which General Joseph E. Johnston subsequently alluded in a conversation with Colonel Freemantle), in refusing full confidence, even to a commander-in-chie
rsations in those social reunions gave me the very highest opinion of his profound judgment. He was a man of stately but winning courtesy, although occasionally indulging in pleasantry. At present I can recall but two of those conversations. One evening we received a St. Louis paper containing a general order of General Fremont, announcing his staff — a numerous body, composed largely of gentlemen with foreign names. As, for instance, General Asboth, Colonel De Alma, Majors Kappner and Blome, Captains Emavic Meizaras, Kalmanuezze, Zagonyi, Vanstein Kiste, Sacche, and Geister, Lieutenants Napoleon Westerburg, Addone, Kroger, etc. After the list was read over to him, the general, with an expressive smile, remarked, There is too much tail to that kite. I believe the United States Government soon afterward came to the same conclusion. On another evening, some of his staff were discussing the question of the probable boundary-line of the Confederate States, in the final treaty of p
sappointment. Looking into the future from this gloom, he began to contemplate the mysteries of life and death, the solution of which he found in the religion of Christ. He entered on his new walk in life with enthusiasm, and it served as an incentive to every honorable deed. He even went beyond his strength, and, persevering ing, and was growing old gracefully in the beneficent exercise of two responsible functions, as a patriarchal master of many slaves, and as an overseer of part of Christ's flock, when the clangor of war called him to the field of battle. Considerable surprise was created by Bishop Polk's action in taking a military command earalling gave the citizen exemption from the duty of defending his home and country. As a priest, he had always remembered that he was a gentleman and a soldier of Christ; as a soldier, he never forgot that, though consecrated to a mission of patriotism, he was first of all a Christian. It certainly does not become any preaching ze
remarked, I now realize what the apostle meant when he said, Some have entertained angels unawares. In this brief sketch and these anecdotes may be discovered the signs of an heroic nature. Polk believed that no calling gave the citizen exemption from the duty of defending his home and country. As a priest, he had always remembered that he was a gentleman and a soldier of Christ; as a soldier, he never forgot that, though consecrated to a mission of patriotism, he was first of all a Christian. It certainly does not become any preaching zealot, who served as a trumpeter calling others to the fray, to condemn or censure him who took up the sword. While Cornelius, the centurion, is accounted righteous, or Abraham is justified for rescuing Lot, the Southern people will hold dear the memory of the soldier-bishop. Henceforth, General Polk was the right arm of his commander. The currents of these two lives that had so nearly touched toward their sources, and afterward had parted so
Charles Clark (search for this): chapter 22
ce, it was chiefly from the ordnance, quartermaster, and commissary supplies belonging to this department that the army was supplied. This was especially the case in regard to that all-important element of an army's success-field transportation. The troops under General Polk's command were chiefly the State troops transferred by Tennessee to the Confederate service — the equivalent of about ten regiments of all arms, with 3,000 muskets, and a brigade of Mississippians under Brigadier-General Charles Clark. Polk had taken command on July 13th, and, two weeks after, sent General Pillow with 6,000 men to New Madrid, on the right bank of the Mississippi. This point was important, because its occupation prevented any movement by the enemy on Pocahontas, by the way of Chalk Bluffs. While it was expected to make the campaign in Tennessee defensive, the intention was to carry on active operations in Missouri by a combined movement of the armies of Price, McCulloch, Hardee, and Pillow
s of an heroic nature. Polk believed that no calling gave the citizen exemption from the duty of defending his home and country. As a priest, he had always remembered that he was a gentleman and a soldier of Christ; as a soldier, he never forgot that, though consecrated to a mission of patriotism, he was first of all a Christian. It certainly does not become any preaching zealot, who served as a trumpeter calling others to the fray, to condemn or censure him who took up the sword. While Cornelius, the centurion, is accounted righteous, or Abraham is justified for rescuing Lot, the Southern people will hold dear the memory of the soldier-bishop. Henceforth, General Polk was the right arm of his commander. The currents of these two lives that had so nearly touched toward their sources, and afterward had parted so widely, moved thereafter with a common purpose to a common end. Their friendship was founded upon mutual esteem. When General Polk came from Europe, he brought with him a
Jefferson Davis (search for this): chapter 22
a troops in his episcopal capacity. Governor Harris, of Tennessee, had asked him to call upon Mr. Davis, and urged upon him prompt measures for the defense of the Mississippi Valley. This, togetherall on the President. The bishop, knowing the transcendent ability of General Johnston, urged Mr. Davis to reserve that most important field for him. As it was known that the general could not reachshould be sent out to take the position pending his arrival. To Bishop Polk's utter surprise, Mr. Davis urged it upon him. Suffice it to say, that, after mature deliberation, he deemed it his duty tus to be permitted to return to his episcopal work, sent in his resignation to the President. Mr. Davis declined to receive it, however, and gave such reasons, backed up by those of other members ofed neutrality of Kentucky. The Secretary of War and Governor Harris both remonstrated; but President Davis replied to his explanations, Necessity justifies your action. Polk was rapidly fortifying,
of which he found in the religion of Christ. He entered on his new walk in life with enthusiasm, and it served as an incentive to every honorable deed. He even went beyond his strength, and, persevering in duty while ill, brought on an attack of pneumonia that impaired his health for years. He was graduated eighth in his class in 1827. The young soldier, after a little delay, resigned his commission, resolving to devote himself to the ministry. At this time he engaged himself to Miss Devereaux, to whom he had been attached from early boyhood; but the marriage was postponed until he had finished his theological education at Alexandria. He was married in May, 1830, and ordained in the Monumental Church, Richmond, Virginia, by Bishop Moore, to whom he became episcopant. To those who remember the stately presence and powerful form of the warrior-bishop thirty years later, it may sound strange to hear that for years he was often disabled by ill-health, and more than once pronounc
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