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Gordonsville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
roops, was stationed within a short distance of Culpeper Court-House, while strong detachments of cavalry and artillery had penetrated even so far southward as Gordonsville, but did not retain possession of that all-important point. They were merely feeling the way to its ultimate occupation. This was perfectly known to us and the value of Gordonsville fully appreciated; for the only two routes to Richmond and the South united there, and, if. once strongly garrisoned by the enemy, they would circumscribe all our operations, and cause the fall of Richmond without the absolute necessity of losing a man. Secrecy has been the characteristic of all our modirections southwest, driving small detachments of the enemy before them. No action or combat of importance, however, had occurred save in the neighborhood of Gordonsville, where a sharp cavalry encounter took place, with loss on both sides; yet the enemy rapidly fell back towards the Rapidan, and seemed disinclined to operate in
Manassas, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
morrow. From dusty and weary scouts who arrived during night, we ascertained something regarding the true position of Banks's army. A few of these adventurous spirits had been prowling about the enemy's encampments in different parts of the country, and had discovered the following facts: One of the enemy's army corps, under Sigel, was on their right among the hills at Sperryville, watching the roads and all direct communication with their rear at Mount Washington, Warrenton, and Manassas Junction; a heavy force was stationed on Pope's left, at or near Waterloo on the Rappahannock, while somewhat to the rear of Banks and Pope was McDowell's corps. It was concluded with reason that these various bodies would be unable to appear upon the field to assist Banks, should Jackson force him to engage on the following day, (Saturday, August ninth.) During the night, pickets, in our extreme front, were popping away at each other occasionally, and early in the morning our advance was
Sperryville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
e position could not be ascertained, Jackson was busily engaged along our lines, making — every disposition for the morrow. From dusty and weary scouts who arrived during night, we ascertained something regarding the true position of Banks's army. A few of these adventurous spirits had been prowling about the enemy's encampments in different parts of the country, and had discovered the following facts: One of the enemy's army corps, under Sigel, was on their right among the hills at Sperryville, watching the roads and all direct communication with their rear at Mount Washington, Warrenton, and Manassas Junction; a heavy force was stationed on Pope's left, at or near Waterloo on the Rappahannock, while somewhat to the rear of Banks and Pope was McDowell's corps. It was concluded with reason that these various bodies would be unable to appear upon the field to assist Banks, should Jackson force him to engage on the following day, (Saturday, August ninth.) During the night, pi
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
inia and preparation for the fall campaign Pope, and the New Federal army on the Rappahannock combinations of the enemy developing by McClellan on our right and Pope on the left preparations and dispositions of General Lee Jackson is sent in the van what he does, and the manner of doing it he breaks the advance corps of his old friend Banks battle of Cedar Mountain. Despite the manoeuvring of McClellan's forces south of the James River, and the threatened advance of Burnside from Suffolk and Norfolk, as if to form a junction and cooperate with him, the true state of the case was soon perceived by our corps of observation at Petersburgh. Either indecision prevailed in the councils of the two generals, or all their movements near the seaboard were intended to hold us in check upon the James, while the large forces of Pope, on the Rappahannock and Rapidan, should obtain eligible positions, and perhaps advance so far as to be beyond our power to arrest them. It is possible th
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
isposition for the morrow. From dusty and weary scouts who arrived during night, we ascertained something regarding the true position of Banks's army. A few of these adventurous spirits had been prowling about the enemy's encampments in different parts of the country, and had discovered the following facts: One of the enemy's army corps, under Sigel, was on their right among the hills at Sperryville, watching the roads and all direct communication with their rear at Mount Washington, Warrenton, and Manassas Junction; a heavy force was stationed on Pope's left, at or near Waterloo on the Rappahannock, while somewhat to the rear of Banks and Pope was McDowell's corps. It was concluded with reason that these various bodies would be unable to appear upon the field to assist Banks, should Jackson force him to engage on the following day, (Saturday, August ninth.) During the night, pickets, in our extreme front, were popping away at each other occasionally, and early in the morni
Cedar Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
Miles advancing from the west through the Valley with a heavy force, and with Washington nearly due north; Banks had massed his troops in a wooded plain near Cedar Mountain. Pope was not more than thirty miles to his left, with large masses advancing; while Miles, with fourteen thousand of all arms, was midway up the Valley, diss that our vanguard were already skirmishing with the enemy, and driving in their outposts. Most of the firing seemed to be in the direction of Cedar Run, or Cedar Mountain, about seven miles from Culpeper, where the enemy were drawn up in order of battle, with an effective strength of more than thirty thousand men, well suppliedd by the enemy's cavalry outposts, so that although our cavalry on the right were enjoying a merry time with those of Pope, our artillery gradually approached Cedar Mountain, and took up a strong position on the north side of it, unknown to the enemy. As this mountain-side commanded the sloping corn-fields and woods, stretching a
Harrison's Landing (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
on's inactivity surprised all who knew him. None could imagine why he remained so long before a powerful enemy, and made no movements of any kind. It seemed, however, that he was waiting for some demonstration from the foe, and this not being vouchsafed, he was content to fall back again at his leisure over the Rapidan, and there await the main army, which all knew was now rapidly marching from Richmond to cooperate with him. McClellan, we were informed, had effected his — escape from Harrison's Landing, and was doubtless transporting his troops to Washington. It was possibly Lee's plan to overwhelm Pope and his Army of Virginia ere the remains of McClellan's Army of the Potomac could come to his assistance. This, however, was only the gossiping surmise of subordinate officers, for generals of divisions never opened their lips, nor even deigned to smile. It seemed to be the ambition of those mysterious individuals, now in particular, to exhibit a cold and reserved demeanor; to be a
Shenandoah Valley (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
. While standing on a hill which overlooks the railroad-bridge, the panorama of this beautiful grass country was presented to my view in a charming prospect. At my feet ran the Rapidan, flowing north-eastwardly, and debouching in the Rappahannock many miles away. All the landscape, north and east, was an undulating plain, plentifully timbered at intervals, while to the north-west and west rose parallel chains of hills and mountains, which, farther inland, inclose the beautiful Valley of the Shenandoah. In the gorgeous sunset of an Indian summer, with its varied tints of blue, gold, purple, and orange, the face of the country was one indescribable vista of sunlight and shade. In the distance various streams pursued their devious course, now lost in the forest, now sparkling in the open-only the pen or pencil of one inspired could give the faintest conception of this verdant, fruitful, and delightful region. Far away in the distance, white and red brick houses dotted the undulat
Slaughter Mountain (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
ful region. Far away in the distance, white and red brick houses dotted the undulating farms; yet not a sign of life was discernible, no flocks, no cattle, no horses; the country was deserted-the young in the army, the old ruthlessly driven from their homesteads. When the sun was sinking, distant reports of musketry, far in advance, informed us that our vanguard were already skirmishing with the enemy, and driving in their outposts. Most of the firing seemed to be in the direction of Cedar Run, or Cedar Mountain, about seven miles from Culpeper, where the enemy were drawn up in order of battle, with an effective strength of more than thirty thousand men, well supplied with artillery. The day was too far advanced for an engagement and as their precise position could not be ascertained, Jackson was busily engaged along our lines, making — every disposition for the morrow. From dusty and weary scouts who arrived during night, we ascertained something regarding the true positio
Waterloo, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 41
ascertained something regarding the true position of Banks's army. A few of these adventurous spirits had been prowling about the enemy's encampments in different parts of the country, and had discovered the following facts: One of the enemy's army corps, under Sigel, was on their right among the hills at Sperryville, watching the roads and all direct communication with their rear at Mount Washington, Warrenton, and Manassas Junction; a heavy force was stationed on Pope's left, at or near Waterloo on the Rappahannock, while somewhat to the rear of Banks and Pope was McDowell's corps. It was concluded with reason that these various bodies would be unable to appear upon the field to assist Banks, should Jackson force him to engage on the following day, (Saturday, August ninth.) During the night, pickets, in our extreme front, were popping away at each other occasionally, and early in the morning our advance was resumed, cautiously and slowly. As the country was admirably adapted
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