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Richard S. Ewell (search for this): chapter 13
n, under Taliaferro, and A. P. Hill's, leaving Ewell's at Bristoe Station, with orders to withdraw oute. In the afternoon, Hooker encountered Ewell at Bristoe Station, where the divisions engageh was handsomely maintained till after night. Ewell, under his orders, withdrew to join Jackson. nassas Gap Railroad, to Manassas Junction. Ewell made his way along the railroad to Jackson in crossed Bull Run, and halted at Centreville. Ewell followed at daylight towards Centreville, croson. Misled by the movements of A. P. Hill and Ewell, he ordered Reno's corps and Kearny's and Hookown corps down the turnpike. A. P. Hill's and Ewell's divisions, returning from the north of Bull s troops along the New Market road, called out Ewell with his brigades under Lawton and Trimble, anis severe loss in the division commanders, General Ewell losing a leg, and Taliaferro severely wounailroad, his own division under General Stark, Ewell's under General Lawton, with A. P. Hill on his[2 more...]
Pope's Headquarters and captures his personal equipment his uniform coat and hat shown along the Confederate lines Jackson's superb flank movement Confederates capture trains, supplies, munitions, and prisoners Hooker and Ewell at Bristoe Station Jackson first on the old field of Bull Run Longstreet's command joins passing Thoroughfare Gap Pope practically throws responsibility for aggressive action on McDowell preliminary fighting General Pope surprised by Jackson Pope's orders to Fitz John Porter. Under the retrograde of the Union army, General Lee so modified his order of march as to meet the new conditions. On the 20th of August the march was made, the right wing to the vicinity of Kelly's Ford on the Rappahannock River, the left to the railroad bridge and fords above. At Kelly's Ford it seemed possible to force a crossing. As we were preparing for it, an order came reporting the upper crossings too well defended, and calling for the right wing to march to that po
McDowell's corps, including Reynolds's division, 15,500; Sigel's corps, 9000; Banks's, 5000; Reno's, 7000; Heintzelman's and Porter's corps, 18,000,--in all 54,500 men, with 4000 cavalry; Platt's brigade, Sturgis's division, which joined him on the 26th, not included. In his rear was Jackson, 20,000; in front on the Rappahannock was my 25,000; R. H. Anderson's reserve division, 5000; total, 50,000, with 3000 of cavalry under Stuart. On the 26th I moved up to and crossed at Hinson's Mill Ford, leaving Anderson's division on the Warrenton Sulphur Springs route. On the 27th, Jackson marched at daylight to Manassas Junction with his own division, under Taliaferro, and A. P. Hill's, leaving Ewell's at Bristoe Station, with orders to withdraw if severely pressed. Approaching the Junction, a cavalry regiment came in, threatening attack, and was driven off by Colonel Baylor's regiment. A field battery came from the direction of Centreville, and tried to make trouble at long range,
William B. Franklin (search for this): chapter 13
c, was at Alexandria awaiting transportation, as were the divisions of Sturgis, ten thousand, and Cox, seven thousand,--the latter from West Virginia. General Pope asked to have Franklin's corps march by the Warrenton turnpike to join him, and sent instructions to different parties to see that the guards in his rear were strengthened; that at Manassas Junction by a division. Under assurances from Washington of the prompt arrival of forces from that quarter, he looked for the approach of Franklin as far as Gainesville, marching by the Warrenton turnpike, and a division to reinforce the command at Manassas Junction, so that when Jackson cut in on his rear and captured the detachment at the Junction, he was not a little surprised. He was in position for grand tactics, however, midway between the right and left wings of his adversary's forces, that in his rear worn by severe marches and some fighting, that in his front behind a river, the crossings of which were difficult, and the li
John Gibbon (search for this): chapter 13
who saw no indication of the presence of a foe. As the division marched, the column was made up of the brigades of Hatch, Gibbon, Doubleday, and Patrick. The action fell against the brigade commanded by General Gibbon, who, taking it for a cavalry aGeneral Gibbon, who, taking it for a cavalry annoyance to cover retreat, opened against it, and essayed aggressive fight, till he found himself engaged against a formidable force of infantry and artillery. He was assisted by part of Doubleday's brigade, and asked for other assistance, which fai. General Doubleday joined the fight with his brigade, and reported his loss nearly half of the troops engaged. General Gibbon called it a surprise. Rebellion Record, vol. XII. part II. p. 381. And well he might, after his division commander y, but did not see them retreat. A deadly fire from three sides welcomed and drove us back. Ibid., p. 371. After night Gibbon held his front by a line of skirmishers, and withdrew his command to a place of rest. At one A. M. the division was with
hat it was after night when he approached Catlett's. He caught a picket-guard and got into a camp about General Pope's Headquarters, took a number of prisoners, some camp property, and, meeting an old acquaintance and friend in a colored man, who conducted him to General Pope's tents, he found one of the general's uniform coats, a hat, a number of official despatches, a large amount of United States currency, much of the general's personal equipments, and one of the members of his staff, Major Goulding. He made several attempts to fire the bridge near Catlett's, but the heavy rains put out all fires that could be started, when he sought axes to cut it away. By this time the troops about the camps rallied and opened severe fire against him, but with little damage. The heavy rainfall admonished him to forego further operations and return to the army while yet there was a chance to cross Cedar Creek and the Rappahannock before the tides came down. On the night of the 23d he reached Su
John P. Hatch (search for this): chapter 13
used the horse artillery under Pelham. As formed, this new line was broadside against the turnpike, his left a little way from Groveton. The ground upon which the action occurred had been passed an hour before by the division commander, General Hatch, who saw no indication of the presence of a foe. As the division marched, the column was made up of the brigades of Hatch, Gibbon, Doubleday, and Patrick. The action fell against the brigade commanded by General Gibbon, who, taking it for a Hatch, Gibbon, Doubleday, and Patrick. The action fell against the brigade commanded by General Gibbon, who, taking it for a cavalry annoyance to cover retreat, opened against it, and essayed aggressive fight, till he found himself engaged against a formidable force of infantry and artillery. He was assisted by part of Doubleday's brigade, and asked for other assistance, which failed to reach him, till night came and ended the contest. His fight was desperate and courageous against odds, but he held it and his line till dark. His loss was seven hundred and fifty-one, including Colonel O'Connor and Major May, morta
S. P. Heintzelman (search for this): chapter 13
o east of Warrenton about three miles, on the turnpike; Porter's (Fifth) corps near Bealton, ordered to join Reno, and Heintzelman's (Third) corps, ten thousand strong, at Warrenton Junction. The Sixth (Franklin's) Corps, ten thousand strong, Army f the 27th: McDowell's corps, including Reynolds's division, 15,500; Sigel's corps, 9000; Banks's, 5000; Reno's, 7000; Heintzelman's and Porter's corps, 18,000,--in all 54,500 men, with 4000 cavalry; Platt's brigade, Sturgis's division, which joinedral Hill was justified by the circumstances that influenced his march. When General Pope reached the Junction with Heintzelman's and Reno's corps, the game was on other fields. As the last of the Confederate columns had hied away towards Centredivision from Centreville by the turnpike at one A. M., to reinforce the troops against Jackson; the other division of Heintzelman's corps (Hooker's) to march by the same route at daylight, and to be followed by the corps under Reno. These orders w
A. P. Hill (search for this): chapter 13
Hill, who was yet north of Bull Run, and ordered him to intercept the retreat by manning the lower fords of Bull Run. The order was received at ten A. M., but General Hill had intercepted despatches of General Pope giving notice of his preparation for battle at Manassas the next day, and thought it better to march on and join Jackson. He filed into line on Jackson's left about noon. General Jackson was right. If General Hill had moved as ordered, he would have met detachments ordered by General Pope to Centreville, and held them back to the south side until Jackson could join him to hold the line. The natural sequence of Confederate operations was position to intercept General Pope's return to Washington. The scenes were shifting and inviting of adventure, and the marches should have followed them. General Hill was justified by the circumstances that influenced his march. When General Pope reached the Junction with Heintzelman's and Reno's corps, the game was on othe
Ambrose P. Hill (search for this): chapter 13
at daylight to Manassas Junction with his own division, under Taliaferro, and A. P. Hill's, leaving Ewell's at Bristoe Station, with orders to withdraw if severely pr Sudley Mills, on the field of first Manassas, at daylight. At one A. M., A. P. Hill marched from Manassas Junction, crossed Bull Run, and halted at Centreville. o'clock, General Pope reached Manassas Junction. Misled by the movements of A. P. Hill and Ewell, he ordered Reno's corps and Kearny's and Hooker's divisions of theh away from him, he took the move for a general retreat, made report of it to A. P. Hill, who was yet north of Bull Run, and ordered him to intercept the retreat by m Warrenton turnpike, and King's division of his own corps down the turnpike. A. P. Hill's and Ewell's divisions, returning from the north of Bull Run, hardly had timoad, his own division under General Stark, Ewell's under General Lawton, with A. P. Hill on his left. General Pope's orders for the night directed the march of Ke
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