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Gibbon, who, taking it for a cavalry annoyance to cover retreat, opened against it, and essayed aggressive fight, till he found himself engaged against a formidable force of infantry and artillery. He was assisted by part of Doubleday's brigade, and asked for other assistance, which failed to reach him, till night came and ended the contest. His fight was desperate and courageous against odds, but he held it and his line till dark. His loss was seven hundred and fifty-one, including Colonel O'Connor and Major May, mortally wounded, with many other officers with lighter hurts. Rebellion Record, vol. XII. part II. p. 378. General Doubleday joined the fight with his brigade, and reported his loss nearly half of the troops engaged. General Gibbon called it a surprise. Rebellion Record, vol. XII. part II. p. 381. And well he might, after his division commander had just passed over the route and failed to find any indication of the lurking foe. General Jackson reported, The
Marsena R. Patrick (search for this): chapter 13
ith his brigades under Lawton and Trimble, and in addition to the artillery of these commands used the horse artillery under Pelham. As formed, this new line was broadside against the turnpike, his left a little way from Groveton. The ground upon which the action occurred had been passed an hour before by the division commander, General Hatch, who saw no indication of the presence of a foe. As the division marched, the column was made up of the brigades of Hatch, Gibbon, Doubleday, and Patrick. The action fell against the brigade commanded by General Gibbon, who, taking it for a cavalry annoyance to cover retreat, opened against it, and essayed aggressive fight, till he found himself engaged against a formidable force of infantry and artillery. He was assisted by part of Doubleday's brigade, and asked for other assistance, which failed to reach him, till night came and ended the contest. His fight was desperate and courageous against odds, but he held it and his line till dark
John Pelham (search for this): chapter 13
en as far as the vicinity of General Pope's headquarters. General Stuart was ordered over, with parts of his brigades, to investigate and make trouble in the enemy's rear. He crossed at Waterloo and Hunt's Mill with fifteen hundred troopers and Pelham's horse artillery, and rode to Warrenton. Passing through, he directed his ride towards Catlett's Station to first burn the bridge over Cedar Creek. Before reaching Catlett's a severe storm burst upon him, bogging the roads and flooding the the front of his right division, and, noting the movement of Sigel's troops along the New Market road, called out Ewell with his brigades under Lawton and Trimble, and in addition to the artillery of these commands used the horse artillery under Pelham. As formed, this new line was broadside against the turnpike, his left a little way from Groveton. The ground upon which the action occurred had been passed an hour before by the division commander, General Hatch, who saw no indication of th
William D. Pender (search for this): chapter 13
sed. Approaching the Junction, a cavalry regiment came in, threatening attack, and was driven off by Colonel Baylor's regiment. A field battery came from the direction of Centreville, and tried to make trouble at long range, but was driven off by superior numbers. Then a brigade of infantry under General Taylor, of New Jersey, just landed from the cars from Alexandria, advanced and made a desperate effort to recover the lost position and equipage at Manassas Junction. Field's, Archer's, Pender's, and Thomas's brigades, moving towards the railroad bridge, met Taylor's command and engaged it, at the same time moving towards its rear, threatening to cut off its retreat. It was driven back after a fierce struggle, General Taylor, commanding, mortally wounded. Part of the Kanawha division under General Scammon was ordered to its support, but was only in time to assist in its retreat. Reporting this affair, General Jackson said,--The advance was made with great spirit and determinati
nds. Communication with Washington being severed, the forces at and near Alexandria were thrown in the dark. To move by rail they were liable to run into the wrong camps, and the rapid change by water to the new position left them short of land transportation. Pope stood on the evening of the 27th: McDowell's corps, including Reynolds's division, 15,500; Sigel's corps, 9000; Banks's, 5000; Reno's, 7000; Heintzelman's and Porter's corps, 18,000,--in all 54,500 men, with 4000 cavalry; Platt's brigade, Sturgis's division, which joined him on the 26th, not included. In his rear was Jackson, 20,000; in front on the Rappahannock was my 25,000; R. H. Anderson's reserve division, 5000; total, 50,000, with 3000 of cavalry under Stuart. On the 26th I moved up to and crossed at Hinson's Mill Ford, leaving Anderson's division on the Warrenton Sulphur Springs route. On the 27th, Jackson marched at daylight to Manassas Junction with his own division, under Taliaferro, and A. P. Hi
e action on McDowell preliminary fighting General Pope surprised by Jackson Pope's orders to Fitzion left them short of land transportation. Pope stood on the evening of the 27th: McDowell's con learning of its import and following. General Pope ordered McDowell, with his own corps, incluble to the commands. After this affair, General Pope so far modified his order of the day as to rch to the Junction. At twelve o'clock, General Pope reached Manassas Junction. Misled by the m General Hill had intercepted despatches of General Pope giving notice of his preparation for battleame time the divisions that had been ordered by Pope to Centreville reached that point, driving off direction of the move again impressed him that Pope was retreating, and that his escape to the nortvised of the withdrawal of King's division, General Pope sent orders to General Porter directing moving's division from the ground of the 28th, General Pope sent as substitutes for his orders of the e[21 more...]
John Porter (search for this): chapter 13
urprised by Jackson Pope's orders to Fitz John Porter. Under the retrograde of the Union army, Warrenton about three miles, on the turnpike; Porter's (Fifth) corps near Bealton, ordered to join Banks's, 5000; Reno's, 7000; Heintzelman's and Porter's corps, 18,000,--in all 54,500 men, with 4000e by the railroad for Bristoe Station, ordered Porter's Fifth Corps to remain at Warrenton Junction n unfinished railroad. The road upon which Porter marched was crowded during the night, so that ng's division, General Pope sent orders to General Porter directing movements for the 29th, informinthe orders of Kearny and Hooker, and directing Porter to move at daylight towards Centreville, for p by the Warrenton turnpike. Under the orders, Porter marched towards Centreville, and Reno towards s for his orders of the early morning that General Porter should push forward with his corps and KinI. part II. p. 518. This order was received by Porter at 9.30 A. M., Ibid., p. 520. but General McD[2 more...]
Edward Pye (search for this): chapter 13
, General Ewell losing a leg, and Taliaferro severely wounded. During the night the Federal commander reported to his subordinates that McDowell had intercepted the retreat of Jackson, and ordered concentration of the army against him, Ibid., pp. 74, 75. whereas it was, of course, Jackson who had intercepted McDowell's march. He seems to have been under the impression that he was about to capture Jackson, and inclined to lead his subordinates to the same opinion. Of the time, Major Edward Pye reported,--We were sent forward towards evening to pursue the enemy, who were said to be retreating. Found the enemy, but did not see them retreat. A deadly fire from three sides welcomed and drove us back. Ibid., p. 371. After night Gibbon held his front by a line of skirmishers, and withdrew his command to a place of rest. At one A. M. the division was withdrawn and marched back to Manassas. Ricketts, finding himself in isolated position at Gainesville, left at daylight and marc
Marcus A. Reno (search for this): chapter 13
on, 15,500; Sigel's corps, 9000; Banks's, 5000; Reno's, 7000; Heintzelman's and Porter's corps, 18,0 march so as to be at Gainesville at nightfall; Reno's corps and Kearny's division of the Third to Grny's division was ordered for Bristoe Station, Reno's corps for Manassas Junction, and McDowell, frched Bristoe at ten A. M., Kearny at eight, and Reno in due season. But it was late in the morning e movements of A. P. Hill and Ewell, he ordered Reno's corps and Kearny's and Hooker's divisions of ope reached the Junction with Heintzelman's and Reno's corps, the game was on other fields. As the daylight, and to be followed by the corps under Reno. These orders were urgent, and directed that toperation of the projected battle, and ordering Reno to march for the battle by the Warrenton turnpiorders, Porter marched towards Centreville, and Reno towards the field for battle. Kearny deferred r's division at convenient marching distance. Reno's column followed the march of the latter. [3 more...]
John F. Reynolds (search for this): chapter 13
on the 24th. Meanwhile, General Pope had received the divisions of Kearny and Reynolds from McClellan's army, forty-five hundred and twenty-five hundred respectively gone astray by the mountains. He concentrated the Army of Virginia, to which Reynolds's division had been assigned, at and near Warrenton under McDowell; Reno east tation. Pope stood on the evening of the 27th: McDowell's corps, including Reynolds's division, 15,500; Sigel's corps, 9000; Banks's, 5000; Reno's, 7000; Heintzelnd following. General Pope ordered McDowell, with his own corps, including Reynolds's division and Sigel's corps, to march so as to be at Gainesville at nightfallout six o'clock McDowell put his troops on the countermarch, Sigel's corps and Reynolds's division back by the New Market road for its crossing of the Warrenton turnpd by Hooker. McDowell's operations of the afternoon left Sigel's corps and Reynolds's division in the vicinity of the field of King's fight. General Pope's order
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