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Cyrus B. Comstock (search for this): chapter 3.28
previous page. The Confederates carrying Howard's breastworks. About sunrise at Dowdall's I heard cheering. It was a hearty sound, with too much bass in it for that of the enemy's charge. It was occasioned by General Hooker, with Colonel Comstock and a few staff-officers, riding along slowly and inspecting the lines. General Sickles says of this: It is impossible to pass over without mention the irrepressible enthusiasm of the troops for Major-General Hooker, which was evinced in he by the shortest route. As he looked over the barricades, while receiving the salutes and cheers of the men, he said to me, How strong! How strong! I still had much extension, so that there were gaps along Schurz's and Devens's fronts. Colonel Comstock spoke to me in his quiet way: General, do close in those spaces! I said, The woods are thick and entangled; will anybody come through there Oh, they may! His suggestion was heeded. During the forenoon General Sickles discovered J
Darius N. Couch (search for this): chapter 3.28
ones existed before the battle), we notice that the two famous rivers, the Rapidan and the Rappahannock, join at a point due north of Chancellorsville; thence the Rappahannock runs easterly for two miles, till suddenly at the United States Ford it turns and flows south for a mile and a half, and then, turning again, completes a horse-shoe bend. Here, on the south shore, was General Hooker's battle-line on the morning of the 2d of May, 1863. Here his five army corps, those of Meade, Slocum, Couch, Sickles, and Howard, were deployed. The face was toward the south, and the ranks mainly occupied a ridge nearly parallel with the Rapidan. The left touched the high ground just west of the horse-shoe bend, while the bristling front, fringed with skirmishers, ran along the Mineral Spring road, bent forward to take in the cross-roads of Chancellorsville, and then, stretching on westerly through lower levels, retired to Dowdall's Tavern. Just beyond Dowdall's was a slight backward hook in t
out and defend the same point. A few companies of cavalry came from Pleasonton. I sent them out. Go out beyond my right; go far, and let me know if an assault is coming. All my staff, Asmussen, Meysenberg, Whittlesey, C. H. Howard, Schofield, Dessauer, Stinson, Schirmer, and Hoffmann, were keenly on the alert. We had not a very good position, it is true, but we did expect to make a good strong fight should the enemy come. General Hooker's circular order to Slocum and Howard neither reache and wounded out of an effective of 1400 men.--editors. had to give way and be broken into fragments. My own horse seemed to catch the fury; he sprang — he rose high on his hind legs and fell over, throwing me to the ground. My aide-de-camp, Dessauer, was struck by a shot and killed, and for a few moments I was as helpless as any of the men who were speeding without arms to the rear. But faithful orderlies helped me to remount. Schurz was still doing all he could to face regiments about an
Charles Devens (search for this): chapter 3.28
wedly to support the batteries and protect General Devens's exposed right flank. As to pickets, e stimulate them to special activity. Those of Devens were thrown out at a distance from a half-mileon, so that there were gaps along Schurz's and Devens's fronts. Colonel Comstock spoke to me in hism into good position to cover Devens's flank. Devens held at least two regiments well in hand, for d certainly no such order came to me. But Generals Devens, Schurz, and Steinwehr, my division commat officer to mount,--The firing is in front of Devens, go and see if all is in order on the extreme of attack, if the attack should extend beyond Devens's right flank; for it was divined at once thator falling before they got behind the cover of Devens's reserves, and before General Schurz's waitincould to face regiments about and send them to Devens's northern flank to help the few who still helf the men in gray. In justice to the men of Devens's division who first resisted Doles it should [12 more...]
Joseph Dickinson (search for this): chapter 3.28
d send them to Devens's northern flank to help the few who still held firm. Devens, already badly wounded, and several officers were doing similar work. I rode quickly to the reserve batteries. A staff-officer of General Hooker, Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Dickinson, Assistant Adjutant-General, joined me there; my own staff gathered around me. I was eager to fill the trenches that Barlow would have held. Buschbeck's second line was ordered to change front there. His men kept their ranks, but at first they appeared slow. Would they never get there! Dickinson said, Oh, General, see those men coming from that hill way off to the right, and there's the enemy after them. Fire, oh, fire at them; you may stop the flight! No, Colonel, I said, I will never fire on my own men! As soon as our men were near enough the batteries opened, firing at first shells and then canister over their heads. As the attacking force emerged from the forest and rushed on, the men in front would ha
Julius Dieckmann (search for this): chapter 3.28
d so that, constituting, as it did, the main right flank, the reserves of the corps could be brought more promptly to its support, by extending its right to the north, should an enemy by any possible contingency get so far around. A section of Dieckmann's battery which looked to the west along the old pike was located at the angle. The reserve batteries, twelve guns, were put upon a ridge abreast of the little church and pointed toward the north-west, with a view to sweep all approaches to e with arms and some without, running or falling before they got behind the cover of Devens's reserves, and before General Schurz's waiting masses could deploy or charge. The noise and the smoke filled the air with excitement, and to add to it Dieckmann's guns and caissons, with battery men scattered, rolled and tumbled like runaway wagons and carts in a thronged city. The guns and the masses of the right brigade struck the second line of Devens before McLean's front had given way; and, more
Hubert Dilger (search for this): chapter 3.28
rch. Next to Steinwehr, toward our right, came General Carl Schurz's division. First was Captain Dilger's battery. Dilger was one of those handsome, _ _ _ hearty, active young men that everybody Dilger was one of those handsome, _ _ _ hearty, active young men that everybody liked to have near. His guns pointed to the southwest and west, along the Orange Plank road. Next was Krzyzanowski's brigade, about half on the front and half in reserve. Schurz's right brigade wasroad near where Jackson fell. from photographs taken in 1864. the reserve artillery fairly. Dilger, the battery commander on Schurz's left, rolled the balls along the Plank road and shelled the was they came. The twelve guns of Schirmer, the corps chief of artillery, increased by a part of Dilger's battery, fired, at first with rapidity; but the battery men kept falling from death and woundsound and swamps, the two miles to the first high land south of Hooker's headquarters. Captain Hubert Dilger with his battery sturdily kept along the Plank road, firing constantly as he retired. T
George Doles (search for this): chapter 3.28
yond his brigade came Iverson's in the same line. On the right of the pike was Doles's brigade, and to his right Colquitt's. One hundred yards to the rear was Trimb, and escaping, where possible, into adjacent clearings. The foremost men of Doles's brigade took about half an hour to strike our advance picket on the pike. Thd effectively for a few minutes, for it required a main line to dislodge them. Doles says, concerning the next check he received, After a resistance of about ten miy to fire the instant it was possible. Let us pause here a moment and follow Doles, who led the enemy's attack. He states that, after his first successful chargee men in gray. In justice to the men of Devens's division who first resisted Doles it should be stated that the official report of the latter shows that his columjected to a heavy musketry fire, with grape, canister, and shell.--editors. Doles, who must have been a cool man to see so clearly amid the screeching shells and
ng on westerly through lower levels, retired to Dowdall's Tavern. Just beyond Dowdall's was a slight backward hook in the line, partially encircling Talley's Hill, ised, with the Twelfth Corps, to occupy the space between his headquarters and Dowdall's clearing; but, finding the distance too great, one of his division commander The nature of the country in the neighborhood of the three adjoining farms, Dowdall's Talley's, and Hawkins's, became well known to the Army of the Potomac in subage. The Confederates carrying Howard's breastworks. About sunrise at Dowdall's I heard cheering. It was a hearty sound, with too much bass in it for that the groups of officers at the different points of observation. We who were at Dowdall's had been watching the enemy's cavalry, which kept pushing through the woods and judicious. Like Blair at Atlanta, he had made his men (who were south of Dowdall's) spring to the reverse side of their intrenchments and be ready to fire the
William H. French (search for this): chapter 3.28
Tavern. Just beyond Dowdall's was a slight backward hook in the line, partially encircling Talley's Hill, a sunny spot in the forest between the Orange Plank road and the pike. This pike is an old roadway which skirts the northern edge of Talley's farm, and makes an angle of some forty degrees with the Orange Plank road. At dawn of that eventful day General Hooker was at Chancellorsville. Slocum and Hancock were just in his front, infantry and artillery deployed to the right and left. French's division was in his rear. Meade occupied the extreme left, and my corps, the Eleventh, the right. Sickles connected me with Slocum. Our lines covered between five and six miles of frontage, and Hooker was near the middle point. The main body of our cavalry, under Stoneman, had gone off on a raid upon Lee's communications, and the remainder of the Army of the Potomac was under the sturdy Sedgwick, beyond Fredericksburg. Our opponents, under General Robert E. Lee, the evening before,
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