hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Braxton Bragg 958 6 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 769 5 Browse Search
George G. Meade 728 6 Browse Search
Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) 717 1 Browse Search
George H. Thomas 542 8 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 485 1 Browse Search
Gettysburg (Pennsylvania, United States) 465 1 Browse Search
James Longstreet 450 6 Browse Search
Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) 398 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 393 5 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. Search the whole document.

Found 390 total hits in 82 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
Joseph D. Moore (search for this): chapter 3.28
orce was threatening his front and his right flank.--editors. Slocum went forward to the aid of Sickles, and Hancock was behind him with support. Next, the enemy was reported to be in full retreat. General Hooker so telegraphed to Sedgwick; Captain Moore, of his staff, who had gone out with Birney to see the attack upon Jackson, came hurriedly to me with an order from General Hooker for my reserve brigade, Barlow's. Major Howard rode rapidly to Sickles, that he might point out exactly where tt to make a grand attack, having been for some time driving the enemy, and expected soon a brilliant result; that he desired to place my reinforcement upon his right flank in the forward movement. Such was the state of things when, through Captain Moore, General Hooker directed to Sickles's attack, at the Furnace, all of my general infantry reserves, consisting of Barlow's stanch brigade. Steinwehr and I, with Major Howard as guide, went far enough southward to see what was to be done with
Alfred Pleasonton (search for this): chapter 3.28
arm into good position to cover Devens's flank. Devens held at least two regiments well in hand, for the same purpose, and Steinwehr's whole division I knew could just face about and defend the same point. A few companies of cavalry came from Pleasonton. I sent them out. Go out beyond my right; go far, and let me know if an assault is coming. All my staff, Asmussen, Meysenberg, Whittlesey, C. H. Howard, Schofield, Dessauer, Stinson, Schirmer, and Hoffmann, were keenly on the alert. We had nused to the first division of our enemy, all his rear lines had closed up, and the broad mass began to appear even below me on my left front to the south of Steinwehr's knoll. Then it was, after we had been fighting an hour, that Sickles's and Pleasonton's guns began to be heard, for they had faced about at Hazel Grove obliquely toward the north-west, and were hurrying artillery, cavalry, and infantry into position to do what they could against the attack now reaching them. I had come to my
Stephen D. Ramseur (search for this): chapter 3.28
eanwhile the Confederate General Rodes had been reaching his place in the Wilderness. At 4 P. M. his men were in position; the line of battle of his own brigade touched the pike west of us with its right and stretched away to the north; beyond his brigade came Iverson's in the same line. On the right of the pike was Doles's brigade, and to his right Colquitt's. One hundred yards to the rear was Trimble's division (Colston Major-General Carl Schurz. From a photograph. commanding), with Ramseur on the right following Colquitt. After another interval followed the division of A. P. Hill. The advance Confederate division had more men in it than there were in the Eleventh Corps, now in position. Counting the ranks of this formidable column, beginning with the enveloping skirmish line, we find 7, besides the 3 ranks of file-closers. Many of them were brought into a solid mass by the entanglements of the forest, and gave our men the idea that battalions were formed in close columns
Official Records (search for this): chapter 3.28
lank. As to pickets, each division had a good line of them. My aide, Major Charles H. Howard, assisted in connecting them between divisions, and during the 2d of May that fearless and faithful staff-officer, Major E. Whittlesey, rode the entire circuit of their front to stimulate them to special activity. Those of Devens were thrown out at a distance from a half-mile to a mile and stretching well around covering our right flank ; See General Devens's report of Chancellorsville ( Official Records, Vol. XXV., Part I., p. 632).--O. O. H. and the picket-posts in front on the pike were over two miles beyond the main line. The nature of the country in the neighborhood of the three adjoining farms, Dowdall's Talley's, and Hawkins's, became well known to the Army of the Potomac in subsequent experiences, never to be forgotten. It is the terrible Wilderness where, later in the war, so many brave men fell. Here were stunted trees, such as scraggy oaks, bushy firs, cedars, and junip
John F. Reynolds (search for this): chapter 3.28
as not doubted. Again, this position, which Schurz recommended in his report subsequent to our battle, was the very one into which Hooker's whole army was forced two days afterward. He was so cramped by it that he did not dare to take the offensive. In that position, solid and fortified as it was, our army, out-numbering Lee's, was so badly handled by the enemy that Hooker at last deemed it safer to return to the north side of the Rappahannock. The strength of Hooker's five corps, and Reynolds's, which was not far behind, was, on tile morning of the 2d of May, about 90,000 effectives. The right corps, the Eleventh, had in all, artillery and infantry, twelve thousand men. Lee faced us with five large divisions, having on the spot about 40,000 rifles, with considerable artillery. In my youth my brother and I had a favorite spot in an upper field of my father's farm from which we were accustomed, after the first symptoms of a coming storm, to watch the operations of the contendi
Robert E. Rodes (search for this): chapter 3.28
ning before, were about two miles distant toward Fredericksburg, and thus between us and Sedgwick. Lee had immediately with him the divisions of McLaws, Anderson, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, besides some cavalry under Stuart. He The old Chancellor house, burned during the battle. From a photograph. held, for his line of n of this plan was intrusted to Lieutenant-General Jackson with his three divisions. Jackson's movement, with a stronger indication of battle, began at sunrise, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, in the order named, following the old road by the Catherine Furnace, there shoving off farther south to get beyond the sight of our men; rt of Sickles's promised attack. There was no real battle there, so we returned rapidly to our post at the tavern and dismounted. Meanwhile the Confederate General Rodes had been reaching his place in the Wilderness. At 4 P. M. his men were in position; the line of battle of his own brigade touched the pike west of us with its
Alexander Schimmelfennig (search for this): chapter 3.28
west and west, along the Orange Plank road. Next was Krzyzanowski's brigade, about half on the front and half in reserve. Schurz's right brigade was that of Schimmelfennig, disposed in the same manner, a part deployed and the remainder kept a few hundred yards back for a reserve. Schurz's front line of infantry extended along toccurred on the evening of May 1st. Then was heard the sudden crack of rifle-shooting. It began with Steinwehr's skirmishers, and then passed on to Schurz. Schimmelfennig pushed out a brigade straightforward toward the south-west and received a sudden fire of artillery from the intruders. They left him and pushed on. It wasoles, who must have been a cool man to see so clearly amid the screeching shells and all the hot excitement of battle, says again: He (meaning our forces from Schimmelfennig's and Buschbeck's brigades, and perhaps part of McLean's, who had faced about and had not yet given way) made a stubborn resistance from behind a wattling fen
Louis Schirmer (search for this): chapter 3.28
ut beyond my right; go far, and let me know if an assault is coming. All my staff, Asmussen, Meysenberg, Whittlesey, C. H. Howard, Schofield, Dessauer, Stinson, Schirmer, and Hoffmann, were keenly on the alert. We had not a very good position, it is true, but we did expect to make a good strong fight should the enemy come. Gen his report that the masses which were rallied here were reorganized and led forward two or three times, but were dispersed by the enemy's flank fire.--editors. Schirmer managed 1. Union breastworks in the woods between Dowdall's Tavern and Chancellorsville. 2. Relics of the dead in the woods near the Plank road. 3. Theainst the attack now reaching them. I had come to my last practicable stand. The Confederates were slowly advancing, firing as they came. The twelve guns of Schirmer, the corps chief of artillery, increased by a part of Dilger's battery, fired, at first with rapidity; but the battery men kept falling from death and wounds. S
George W. Schofield (search for this): chapter 3.28
ious and, with my approval, moved a part of his reserves to the north of Hawkins's farm into good position to cover Devens's flank. Devens held at least two regiments well in hand, for the same purpose, and Steinwehr's whole division I knew could just face about and defend the same point. A few companies of cavalry came from Pleasonton. I sent them out. Go out beyond my right; go far, and let me know if an assault is coming. All my staff, Asmussen, Meysenberg, Whittlesey, C. H. Howard, Schofield, Dessauer, Stinson, Schirmer, and Hoffmann, were keenly on the alert. We had not a very good position, it is true, but we did expect to make a good strong fight should the enemy come. General Hooker's circular order to Slocum and Howard neither reached me, nor, to my knowledge, Colonel Meysenberg, my adjutant-general. See pp. 219 and 220. The original dispatch is not on file in the War Records Office, but a copy of it exists in Hooker's Letters sent book and in one of the two Letter
Carl Schurz (search for this): chapter 3.28
xt to Steinwehr, toward our right, came General Carl Schurz's division. First was Captain Dilger's about half on the front and half in reserve. Schurz's right brigade was that of Schimmelfennig, dion,--the Second Brigade, under McLean, next to Schurz's first, and then pushing out on the pike for Steinwehr's skirmishers, and then passed on to Schurz. Schimmelfennig pushed out a brigade straightticed the breastworks, unusually well built by Schurz and Devens. He passed to the extreme right, a than three or four miles off, and in motion. Schurz was anxious and, with my approval, moved a parno such order came to me. But Generals Devens, Schurz, and Steinwehr, my division commanders, and myar was Trimble's division (Colston Major-General Carl Schurz. From a photograph. commanding), w But faithful orderlies helped me to remount. Schurz was still doing all he could to face regimentsted, We've done all we can, and ran on. General Schurz states in his report that the masses which[8 more...]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9