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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). Search the whole document.

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April 11th (search for this): chapter 2
lroad superintendent by General Mitchel. Very respectfully and truly, L. F. Zantzinger. [inclosure]Corinth, April 28, 1862. I was sent to Huntsville, Ala., by Mr. M. J. Waldron about the 31st March or 1st April, and ordered to report to Mr. A. J. Hopper, superintendent of Eastern Division of Memphis and Charleston Railroad, which I did. I remained in the office as assistant telegraph operator for purpose of attending to running of trains for the Government, remaining there until the 11th or 12th April. Mr. Pride, the regular operator, was sent by Mr. Hopper, so I was informed by Pride, to Shelbyville, partly to see his parents and partly to find out the position of the Federals. The day after Pride left Mr. Hopper informed me he thought I had better go to Corinth, as I could be of more service there than at Huntsville. I immediately left the office and removed my baggage to the hotel, intending to take the cars for Corinth the next day. A Mr. Larkum, or Larkin, took my
April 12th (search for this): chapter 2
intendent by General Mitchel. Very respectfully and truly, L. F. Zantzinger. [inclosure]Corinth, April 28, 1862. I was sent to Huntsville, Ala., by Mr. M. J. Waldron about the 31st March or 1st April, and ordered to report to Mr. A. J. Hopper, superintendent of Eastern Division of Memphis and Charleston Railroad, which I did. I remained in the office as assistant telegraph operator for purpose of attending to running of trains for the Government, remaining there until the 11th or 12th April. Mr. Pride, the regular operator, was sent by Mr. Hopper, so I was informed by Pride, to Shelbyville, partly to see his parents and partly to find out the position of the Federals. The day after Pride left Mr. Hopper informed me he thought I had better go to Corinth, as I could be of more service there than at Huntsville. I immediately left the office and removed my baggage to the hotel, intending to take the cars for Corinth the next day. A Mr. Larkum, or Larkin, took my place in th
April 15th (search for this): chapter 2
closed note from General Cooper, and inclose it, together with the article in question, for your perusal. I am, very respectfully, &c., R. E. Lee, General. [Inclosure.]April 25, 1862. General R. E. Lee, &c.: General: In the Examiner of to-day is published an article from the New York Herald, giving verbatim the telegraphic dispatch of General Beauregard of the 9th instant to me, which was in cipher. This information appears to have been communicated from Nashville under date of April 15. The only copy that was made from the original dispatch was sent to you, together with the telegraph, in cipher; the rough, from which the copy sent you was made, has never been out of my possession, and I am therefore led to the conclusion that the telegraph communicated from Nashville must have been obtained some — where in that quarter. Under the circumstances would it not be well to advise General Beauregard of the fact, and suggest a change in his cipher or the adoption of an entir
April 16th (search for this): chapter 2
e Governor of Alabama to send you two additional regiments. Those regiments are now at Talladega, and will be ordered to Chattanooga. They are not armed. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant R. E. Lee, General, Commanding. Atlanta, Ga., May 2, 1862. Hon. George W. Randolph, Secretary of War: Your dispatch just received. Refers probably to Davis' dispatch of May 2, p. 481. I turned over all the State troops to General Lawton, in command at Savannah, on the 16th of April. Under our correspondence he accepted them, and I notified you of my action. I think he has disbanded most of them and sent them home. If re-enforcements are not sent to Chattanooga immediately we shall be cut off from the coal mines, and all the iron mills and machine-shops in the State will be stopped. I have no means to arm the militia, and could not organize a force sufficient without taking conscripts. Joseph E. Brown. Special orders, no. 49. Hdqrs. Army of the Mississi
April 17th (search for this): chapter 2
eauregard has increased the one 25 per cent. and the other 50 per cent. Neither lard nor molasses are parts of the regular ration. They have been used by this department as a substitute .for meat. Large quantities of the former were bought last summer, and arrangements for an unlimited supply of the latter had been fixed before the fall of New Orleans. General Beauregard allows a gill a day of the latter and 8 ounces of the former, whenever it can be procured, every five days. On the 17th April that army had also 1,300,000 half rations of coffee. In fact, it is now being fed on a ration larger than is allowed by the Regulations, and far better than the Army of the East, which without a murmur acquiesces in the obvious necessity of curtailing the meat. At General Beauregard's representations, and contrary to the decision of the previous Secretary, you allowed coffee to be purchased for his army irrespective of limited price, while the rest of our forces are without it. I add t
April 29th (search for this): chapter 2
Earl Van Dorn: M. M. Kimmel. headquarters, Richmond, Va., May 27, 1862. Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, Commanding Department, Knoxville, Tenn.: General: On the 29th April Governor Brown, of Georgia, was requested by telegraph to send the regiment of cavalry at Dalton commanded by Colonel Glenn, and that at Cartersville under Colo of the 27th instant, Not found referred by you to me, has been considered, and I beg leave to submit the following remarks in reply thereto: Your order of April 29, suspended by General Beauregard increased the flour, if needed, and reduced the meat ration by one-fourth of a pound each. That is sufficient for robust men atention to be sent to Chattanooga if the Ordnance Department can supply one. I wrote to you on May 27 to inform you that I telegraphed the Governor of Georgia on April 29 to order Colonel Glenn's regiment of cavalry at Dalton, and that of Colonel Morrison at Cartersville, to proceed at once to Chattanooga, to report to the command
ber near 600 and the mortality is daily on the increase. The Ninth Mississippi has been furloughed, and the term of service of the Sixth Georgia expires early in May. Two regiments can be organized in East Tennessee, but they will not muster into service for a longer period than twelve months and cannot arm themselves. Tho serve, they would be useful to General Heth. There are three Tennessee regiments in the army of General Joseph E. Johnston whose term of service will expire in May, and their officers state that the men would re-enlist for the war if permitted to return to Tennessee. These regiments cannot now be spared unless their places rtment are at Cumberland Gap, where they are needed. General Mitchel's force in North Alabama is composed of four brigades, and, by a report intercepted early in May, numbered some 9,000 men, with three batteries of eight guns each. This force has been kept constantly occupied by our cavalry operating in Middle Tennessee, on
d to. G. W. C. Lee, Colonel and Aide-de-Camp to the President. Richmond, Va., May 2, 1862. Gov. Joseph E. Brown, of Georgia, Atlanta, Ga.: Your dispatch of 1st May referred to me. I concur with you as to the importance of Chattanooga. The six regiments called from Camp McDonald were with difficulty armed. Every effort wat Dalton commanded by Colonel Glenn, and that at Cartersville under Colonel Morrison, to Chattanooga, to report to the commanding officer at that point. On the 1st of May Governor Shorter, of Alabama, was desired to send two infantry regiments at Talladega to Chattanooga, and the Ordnance Bureau directed to forward arms for them.of Colonel Morrison at Cartersville, to proceed at once to Chattanooga, to report to the commanding officer at that place. At the same time I informed you that on May 1 the Governor of Alabama was requested to send two infantry regiments at Talladega to Chattanooga, and the Ordnance Department was requested to forward arms to that
North Carolina which was ordered to you. I have also informed you by telegram that I have applied to the Governor of Alabama to send you two additional regiments. Those regiments are now at Talladega, and will be ordered to Chattanooga. They are not armed. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant R. E. Lee, General, Commanding. Atlanta, Ga., May 2, 1862. Hon. George W. Randolph, Secretary of War: Your dispatch just received. Refers probably to Davis' dispatch of May 2, p. 481. I turned over all the State troops to General Lawton, in command at Savannah, on the 16th of April. Under our correspondence he accepted them, and I notified you of my action. I think he has disbanded most of them and sent them home. If re-enforcements are not sent to Chattanooga immediately we shall be cut off from the coal mines, and all the iron mills and machine-shops in the State will be stopped. I have no means to arm the militia, and could not organize a force suffici
eption of that enabling the courts to take cognizance of the probate of wills, the administration of the estates of deceased persons, the qualification of guardians to enter decrees and orders for the partition and sale of property, to make orders concerning roads and bridges, to assess county levies, and to order the payment of county dues), and the suspension of the writ of habeas corpus in the counties aforesaid. In faith whereof I have hereunto signed my name and set my seal this third day of May, in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two. Jefferson Davis. Ii. Brig. Gen. Humphrey Marshall is charged with the due execution of the foregoing proclamation. He will forthwith establish an efficient military police, and will enforce the following orders: All distillation of spirituous liquors is positively prohibited, and the distilleries will forthwith be closed. The sale of spirituous liquors of any kind is also prohibited, and establishments for the sale there
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