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ere I remained until the morning of the twenty-first instant, when it was discovered that the enemy ring the night. Resumed the march on the twenty-first, at seven A. M. Found the roads very heavy,int about four miles from Eatonton. On the twenty-first, we marched through Eatonton and on toward ry, in the campaign which closed on the twenty-first instant, by the occupation of the city of Savanh have since died. On the morning of the twenty-first, finding the enemy's works evacuated, we im regiment in the campaign ending on the twenty-first instant. This regiment broke camp on the fouremained there until the morning of the twenty first instant. The enemy having evacuated the cityber, to the capture of Savannah, on the twenty-first instant. By special order from corps headquaof the enemy's line. At daylight, on the twenty-first, the regiment was ordered to move toward thillery of the enemy till the morning of the twenty-first, when, in conjunction with the corps, we en[13 more...]
ed severely in the thigh. In the evening of the twenty-second, the Second brigade was brought to its present cimer's, where we encamped for the night. On the twenty-second and twenty-third we were busily engaged loading miles. At a quarter past seven A. M., on the twenty-second, my march was continued. My command moved in thilledgeville, making about fifteen miles. On the twenty-second, we marched about eleven miles to Milledgeville;nt into camp and destroyed the railroad. On the twenty-second, we crossed the Oconee River and passed through from Milledgeville, entered Milledgeville on the twenty-second, and lay over until the morning of the twenty-foerly direction, and reached Milledgeville on the twenty-second; we marched thence on the twenty-fourth, and paswhere we encamped for the first night. On the twenty-second, some four hundred and fifty (450) wagons were lundred and seventy-six. On the morning of the twenty-second, those detachments of the train which had a perm
atimer's on our return at one P. M., on the twenty-third, and encamped for the night about two milese, and encamped on the east bank. On the twenty-third, the regiment destroyed one mile of the rai M., having marched seventeen miles. On the twenty-third, my brigade remained in camp near the Oconethe morning of the twenty-second. On the twenty-third, my command moved back toward the city, and the enemy or casualties therefrom. On the twenty-third, we moved in and took position on the bank ence to the requirements of circular of twenty-third instant, I have the honor to make the followingamped for the second night. By noon of the twenty-third, all the wagons were loaded, and the head ocellaneous wagons. On the morning of the twenty-third, all the empty wagons (amounting to over tht of operations required by circular of twenty-third instant: Having pitched camp in Atlanta the from brigade headquarters, of date the twenty-third instant, I have the honor to submit the followi
les from Decatur. At eleven A. M., on the twenty-fourth, this brigade moved from its encampment, h two hundred men for that purpose. On the twenty-fourth, this detail was reduced to one hundred me horses and mules. At six A. M., on the twenty-fourth, my brigade resumed its march, leading then the twenty-third remained there. On the twenty-fourth, marched toward Hebron, about fifteen milehe twenty-second. On the morning of the twenty-fourth, we again took up the line of march, movin, where we remained one day. On the twenty-fourth instant, resumed the march in an easterly direhe twenty-second; we marched thence on the twenty-fourth, and passed through Sandersville on the twought from near the Oconoco River. On the twenty-fourth, (8) eight horses, (8) eight mules, (25) t Decatur for Atlanta at seven A. M. of the twenty-fourth. No enemy was seen, excepting a few strage in the evening. On the morning of the twenty-fourth, the expedition marched to Atlanta, and th
detail of two hundred men for that purpose. On the twenty-fourth, this detail was reduced to one hundred men. On the twenty-fifth, I received an order to join with my brigade a foraging expedition to be sent out on the following day under the commat half-past 4 P. M. encamped on the ridge beyond. The distance marched on this day was about fifteen miles. On the twenty-fifth, at six A. M., my brigade continued its march, again being the van-guard of the division and corps. Bluff Creek was plle; and on the twenty-third remained there. On the twenty-fourth, marched toward Hebron, about fifteen miles. On the twenty-fifth, the regiment was the leading regiment of the corps. We marched about four miles until we reached Buffalo Creek wherehed Milledgeville on the twenty-second; we marched thence on the twenty-fourth, and passed through Sandersville on the twenty-fifth, Louisville on the twenty-ninth, rested the thirtieth, passed Bulkhead Church December third in the morning, and on th
six (6) miles from Sandersville. On the twenty-sixth, moved at six A. M.; had proceeded but aboury on the Decatur road at six A. M., on the twenty-sixth, and was assigned, in connection with a batted and withdrawn. On the ensuing day, the twenty-sixth, my brigade resumed the march at a quarter re ordered to encamp for the night. On the twenty-sixth, we marched toward Sandersville. After prong Second division, Twentieth corps, on the twenty-sixth, twenty-seventh, twenty-eighth, and twenty-d entered Sandersville, Georgia, on the twenty-sixth instant, and marched to Tennille Station, on Cel the morning of the twenty-fourth. On the twenty-sixth, arrived at Sandersville, on the left of thon Captain Sherman, of company A. On the twenty-sixth, the regiment marched in front of the briga15) fifteen of fodder were taken up. On the twenty-sixth, near Sandersville, (10) ten horses, (6) sier-General Geary, which left Atlanta on the twenty-sixth, and returned on the fourth day. All the
ar the station. Resumed the march on the twenty-seventh instant, at six A. M. Marched fifteen miles, and catone Mountain at half-past 9 P. M. Early on the twenty-seventh, by General Geary's direction, I sent out two re marched on this day was nine miles. On the twenty-seventh, my brigade marched in the centre of the divisied about half a mile of the railroad. On the twenty-seventh, we reached Davisboro Station, on the Georgia Cight, having marched about twelve miles. On the twenty-seventh, we marched to Davisboro, a distance of about trailroad, and camped for the night. On the twenty-seventh instant, we continued the destruction of the road ut doing picket-duty for the division. On the twenty-seventh, the picket was attacked by a small scouting-pa roads, remaining here until the evening of the twenty-seventh, when the column started about eight P. M., andountain, having marched twenty miles. On the twenty-seventh, most of the regiment remained in camp, guardin
, and shall therefore limit myself to the time of actual command. On the twenty-eighth, by order of Brigadier-General A. S. Williams, commanding division, I formaof hostile cavalry, in loading one hundred and ninety-six wagons. On the twenty-eighth, by direction of General Geary, I proceeded with my brigade, a section of ace of about twenty miles, having to make a detour to avoid a swamp. On the twenty-eighth, we marched along the railroad to Spiers's, tearing up the track to within P. M., when we marched to Waynesboro, and camped for the night. On the twenty-eighth instant, we marched back toward Tennville, and destroyed the railroad as we wenbout eight P. M., and marched about seven (7) miles toward Atlanta. On the twenty-eighth, started about noon, and reached the regimental camp at Atlanta about six P who had been sent some five miles south-east of Stone Mountain. On the twenty-eighth, the regiment remained in camp until four P. M., when with brigade it moved
ed four miles of track during the day. At seven A. M., on the twenty-ninth, my brigade returned about two miles up the track and completed destruction of seven miles, it did its full proportion. On the twenty-ninth, we went back about three miles, and finished the destruction of between Davisboro and Spiers Station. Resumed the march on the twenty-ninth, and on the thirtieth crossed the Ogeechee River. No incident od, on the night of the twenty-seventh. Passed Louisville on the twenty-ninth, a point on the left of the Georgia Central Railroad; on the thissed through Sandersville on the twenty-fifth, Louisville on the twenty-ninth, rested the thirtieth, passed Bulkhead Church December third in n successful in loading some fifty wagons with forage. On the twenty-ninth, the regiment, in rear of brigade and in the centre of Second dight. Engineers and pontoniers were at once put to work, and twenty-ninth instant the troops and trains commenced crossing; the rear of the tr
the track for two days, destroying both ties and rails. On the thirtieth, left the railroad, moving up the Ogeechee River on the south sidl amount of provisions, and other promiscuous articles. On the thirtieth, orders were issued to send all surplus baggage to the rear, and t, picketing well the bank of the river. On the morning of the thirtieth, the regiment sent forward to the river was withdrawn and rejoinem the corps, for the purpose of guarding the corps train. On the thirtieth, we crossed the Little Ogeechee, several miles above the railroadmarched in the direction of Louisville about twelve miles. On the thirtieth, we marched to where the Third division was in camp, about two ange and trestle-work was completed. During the afternoon of the thirtieth, I was ordered to rejoin the division, and a guide was sent to cointh, a point on the left of the Georgia Central Railroad; on the thirtieth, lay over. On the seventh of December, arrived at Springfield; o
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