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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore). Search the whole document.

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September 16th (search for this): chapter 64
eers, from the second day of September to the twentieth day of December, 1864. When the city of Atlanta was first occupied by our forces, September second, the regiment was stationed north of the Chattahoochee River. It marched on the sixteenth of September to Atlanta, and remained encamped in the suburbs of the city, until the thirtieth of the same month, when it returned to the Chattahoochee, and was assigned a position on the south side of the river, protecting the railroad bridge. On When the city of Atlanta was taken possession of by the troops of the Twentieth army corps, my regiment, then in command of Colonel Dustin, was left at the Chattahoochee River, to guard the bridges and stores remaining there. After the sixteenth of September, all the regiments of the First brigade, except the One Hundred and Fifth, having moved down to Atlanta, this command, in connection with the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin infantry, performed duty at the river. Strong works were prepared, and t
September 18th (search for this): chapter 64
on. September 11.--Moved camp three hundred yards to the rear, and erected comfortable, neat, and uniform quarters. September 12 to 17, inclusive.--Remained in same camp, having drills, roll-calls, guard-mount, and dress-parade daily. September 18.--This regiment paraded for review with the division, but the review was prevented by rain. September 19.--Raised a flag-pole, and run up our garrison flag. September 20.--The regiment took part in the review of the division by Major-Gener. Strong works were prepared, and the utmost vigilance exercised to guard against guerrillas and marauders, who infested the country thereabouts. Colonel Dustin assumed command of the brigade, in the absence of Colonel Harrison, on the eighteenth September, when Lieutenant-Colonel Dutton commanded the regiment, until the ninth October, when, having received leave of absence, he left for Illinois; since his absence I have had command. While lying at the river, frequent details were made for
September 19th (search for this): chapter 64
the city, near the Decatur road. September 3.--Quarters erected by the men. September 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10.--Remained in same position. September 11.--Moved camp three hundred yards to the rear, and erected comfortable, neat, and uniform quarters. September 12 to 17, inclusive.--Remained in same camp, having drills, roll-calls, guard-mount, and dress-parade daily. September 18.--This regiment paraded for review with the division, but the review was prevented by rain. September 19.--Raised a flag-pole, and run up our garrison flag. September 20.--The regiment took part in the review of the division by Major-General Slocum. September 21 to October 3.--The regiment remained in same camp. October 4.--Moved at six o'clock P. M. into the rebel defences of the city of Atlanta, on the Marietta road; the One Hundred and Fiftieth regiment on the right of the brigade. Very large details of from eighty to one hundred men from the regiment worked daily on the interio
September 20th (search for this): chapter 64
having drills, roll-calls, guard-mount, and dress-parade daily. September 18.--This regiment paraded for review with the division, but the review was prevented by rain. September 19.--Raised a flag-pole, and run up our garrison flag. September 20.--The regiment took part in the review of the division by Major-General Slocum. September 21 to October 3.--The regiment remained in same camp. October 4.--Moved at six o'clock P. M. into the rebel defences of the city of Atlanta, on therills were held, estimates forwarded for clothing, equipage, and stores, to furnish the command for the fine winter campaign, as ordered. The regiment formed a portion of a foraging expedition sent out under command of Colonel Robinson, September twentieth. The regiment loaded twenty-eight (28) wagons with corn, when the expedition returned to camp. Again, October twenty-sixth, it formed a part of a foraging expedition sent out under charge of Brigadier-General Geary, the regiment loading
September 21st (search for this): chapter 64
paraded for review with the division, but the review was prevented by rain. September 19.--Raised a flag-pole, and run up our garrison flag. September 20.--The regiment took part in the review of the division by Major-General Slocum. September 21 to October 3.--The regiment remained in same camp. October 4.--Moved at six o'clock P. M. into the rebel defences of the city of Atlanta, on the Marietta road; the One Hundred and Fiftieth regiment on the right of the brigade. Very large dnd First regiment of Illinois volunteers, from the occupation of Atlanta by the United States forces, to the capture of the city of Savannah. From the second of September, when Atlanta fell into the hands of the Union army, until the twenty-first of September, the regiment which I have the honor to command remained quietly in camp. On the twenty-first, it was detailed on duty in the fire department, and remained on that duty during the whole time that Atlanta was occupied by our forces. On
September 22nd (search for this): chapter 64
cted by the men, and the camps of the several regiments were paragons of neatness and regularity, reflecting much credit upon both officers and men. On September twenty-second, General Joseph F. Knipe, then commanding the brigade, started for Memphis, Tennessee, having been ordered to report there by an order from General Shermamy of Tennessee. Colonel Warren W. Packer, Fifth Connecticut veteran volunteers, being senior in rank, assumed command of the brigade on the morning of September twenty-second. On September twenty-eighth, the One Hundred and Forty-first regiment New-York volunteers were detailed to report to Colonel Crane, One Hundred and Sevenvision, to proceed to Chattanooga to escort paymasters to Atlanta, which duty was performed without particular incident, and the regiment reported back on September twenty-second. October 11th.--The brigade, except the Twenty-ninth Pennsylvania veteran volunteers, constituted a part of a foraging force of about two thousand infa
September 23rd (search for this): chapter 64
capture of Atlanta, and of the position of troops in the city, so that it is now unnecessary to repeat. The troops remained in the same position until September twenty-third, when the First brigade and one regiment (Twenty-sixth Wisconsin) of the Third brigade were moved to the railroad bridge, over the Chattahoochee River, whreport: The brigade, which I had the honor to command, was stationed at the railroad bridge across the Chattahoochee River, during the interval between September twenty-third and the commencement of the campaign just ended. On the fifteenth of October last, I received permission from Major-General Slocum, commanding United Sr: I have the honor to report the operations of the division, during the time that I had the honor to command it, as follows: I assumed command on the twenty-third of September, Brigadier-General Ward being absent on leave. I found the First brigade in command of Colonel Smith, of the One Hundred and Second Illinois; the Seco
September 24th (search for this): chapter 64
igue and picket-duty; the fatigue-party having been engaged in building a new line of works about the city. On the fourteenth of September, two hundred and fifty men, with a proper proportion of officers and non-commissioned officers, all under the charge of Captain Ezra Sprague, were sent to accompany Colonel La Due, Assistant Quartermaster of the corps, on a foraging expedition, and succeeded in loading one hundred and twenty-five wagons, having been absent two days. From the twenty-fourth of September to the tenth of November, I was absent from the regiment in command of the Third brigade of this division, during which time the regiment accompanied a foraging expedition which went out under command of Colonel Dustin, then in command of this division. A detailed report of that expedition will be made by Major Pardee, who was in command of the regiment at that time, and during the time of my absence. On the fifth November, the regiment moved with the division out of camp about t
September 25th (search for this): chapter 64
irst Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps: Lieutenant: In compliance with circular from headquarters First brigade, Second division, Twentieth corps, dated Savannah, Georgia, December twenty-third, 1864, I have the honor to make the following report of my command: I assumed command of the Twenty-ninth Ohio on the eighth day of September, 1864, at Atlanta, Georgia. From this date to the twenty-fourth nothing of note took place more than the regular routine of camp duty. September 25.--Had review. September 28.--Received detail to go to Nashville, Tennessee, with my regiment. September 29.--At nine A. M., marched the regiment to Captain----'s quarters for transportation; failed, and returned to camp. October 2.--Received orders to move at once, with one day's rations; marched to the depot at three P. M., moved to the Chattahoochee River, disembarked and marched across the river, camped for the night. 4th. Put my command on the train for Nashville, when I
September 28th (search for this): chapter 64
an, to assume the duties of Chief of Cavalry of the army of Tennessee. Colonel Warren W. Packer, Fifth Connecticut veteran volunteers, being senior in rank, assumed command of the brigade on the morning of September twenty-second. On September twenty-eighth, the One Hundred and Forty-first regiment New-York volunteers were detailed to report to Colonel Crane, One Hundred and Seventh New-York volunteers, for duty in the city, in accordance with orders from division headquarters, where they r I assumed command of the Twenty-ninth Ohio on the eighth day of September, 1864, at Atlanta, Georgia. From this date to the twenty-fourth nothing of note took place more than the regular routine of camp duty. September 25.--Had review. September 28.--Received detail to go to Nashville, Tennessee, with my regiment. September 29.--At nine A. M., marched the regiment to Captain----'s quarters for transportation; failed, and returned to camp. October 2.--Received orders to move at once
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