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September 29th (search for this): chapter 64
First brigade, Second division, Twentieth corps, dated Savannah, Georgia, December twenty-third, 1864, I have the honor to make the following report of my command: I assumed command of the Twenty-ninth Ohio on the eighth day of September, 1864, at Atlanta, Georgia. From this date to the twenty-fourth nothing of note took place more than the regular routine of camp duty. September 25.--Had review. September 28.--Received detail to go to Nashville, Tennessee, with my regiment. September 29.--At nine A. M., marched the regiment to Captain----'s quarters for transportation; failed, and returned to camp. October 2.--Received orders to move at once, with one day's rations; marched to the depot at three P. M., moved to the Chattahoochee River, disembarked and marched across the river, camped for the night. 4th. Put my command on the train for Nashville, when I received a telegram to return to Atlanta. Recrossed the river and took the cars for Atlanta; after arriving in t
ta, Ga., on the fourth day of September, 1864, and went into camp. The months of September and October were occupied in building defences around the city and doing garrison duty. On the ninth of Noeth of that month; the teams that were sent out returned loaded with forage. About the last of October, Captain D. W. Sedwick commanded a detachment from the regiment, which foraged in the same locaoccupation of Atlanta by our forces. Forage-parties from the brigade were first organized in October, communication with the rear being intercepted, and in two expeditions to Flat Rock and Stone Mroad on the left, and connecting with the pickets of the First division. During the month of October, heavy details were made from the Second and Third brigades, for work upon the fortifications tty, and the men performed a large amount of hard labor upon these works. During the month of October, four large foraging expeditions were sent out from Atlanta, by authority of the corps commande
October 1st (search for this): chapter 64
teers were assigned to special duty in Atlanta — the former as provost-guard, and the latter reporting to Colonel Beck with, Chief Commissary. During the month of September, nothing occurred to disturb the routine of camp life. About the first of October, a general movement of all the corps, excepting the Twentieth, was made to the rear to meet certain movements of the enemy. Our corps being left to hold Atlanta, we commenced the construction of an inner line of forts and rifle-pits, our cath October, when, having received leave of absence, he left for Illinois; since his absence I have had command. While lying at the river, frequent details were made for foraging purposes. The First brigade, having moved back from Atlanta on first October, all the regiments furnished men for foraging parties. On the twenty-fourth of October, I was sent out in charge of a party of five hundred and fifty men, and a train of wagons, to be gone three days. On the second day out, the party was att
October 2nd (search for this): chapter 64
the following report of my command: I assumed command of the Twenty-ninth Ohio on the eighth day of September, 1864, at Atlanta, Georgia. From this date to the twenty-fourth nothing of note took place more than the regular routine of camp duty. September 25.--Had review. September 28.--Received detail to go to Nashville, Tennessee, with my regiment. September 29.--At nine A. M., marched the regiment to Captain----'s quarters for transportation; failed, and returned to camp. October 2.--Received orders to move at once, with one day's rations; marched to the depot at three P. M., moved to the Chattahoochee River, disembarked and marched across the river, camped for the night. 4th. Put my command on the train for Nashville, when I received a telegram to return to Atlanta. Recrossed the river and took the cars for Atlanta; after arriving in the city, went into camp two (2) miles north-west from depot, facing south. 11th. Moved the regiment to the right one half-mi
October 3rd (search for this): chapter 64
view with the division, but the review was prevented by rain. September 19.--Raised a flag-pole, and run up our garrison flag. September 20.--The regiment took part in the review of the division by Major-General Slocum. September 21 to October 3.--The regiment remained in same camp. October 4.--Moved at six o'clock P. M. into the rebel defences of the city of Atlanta, on the Marietta road; the One Hundred and Fiftieth regiment on the right of the brigade. Very large details of froment since the date of my last report made soon after the occupation of Atlanta, on the sixth of September: From this date to the fifth of November, the regiment remained in camp south of Atlanta, near the line of rebel works, and from the third of October to the last-named date, furnished nearly one half of the effective force of the regiment for fatigue and picket-duty; the fatigue-party having been engaged in building a new line of works about the city. On the fourteenth of September, two
October 4th (search for this): chapter 64
pi, for duty in the city. The two regiments above named remained on such duties during the occupation of Atlanta. October 4.--The brigade moved over to the north side of the city, and took position in the rebel earthworks from the Marietta roae review of the division by Major-General Slocum. September 21 to October 3.--The regiment remained in same camp. October 4.--Moved at six o'clock P. M. into the rebel defences of the city of Atlanta, on the Marietta road; the One Hundred and established, under which exercise the troops seemed to be rapidly improving in discipline and efficiency. On the fourth of October, the Twentieth corps, having been charged with the sole occupation and defence of Atlanta, a new chain of defences g the occupation of Atlanta, from September third to November eleventh, 1864. From the third of September to the fourth of October, the regiment was in position on the right of the Augusta Railroad, and near the line of rebel works that cover Atl
October 5th (search for this): chapter 64
sion, Twentieth Army Corps: sir: In accordance with circular from brigade headquarters, of December twenty-third, and accompanying instructions from division headquarters, I have the honor of making the following report of operations of the Thirteenth regiment, New-Jersey volunteers, from the occupation of Atlanta to the present date. September 2.--Entered Atlanta at eight P. M., and went into the enemy's works on the east of the city, to the left of and near the Georgia Railroad. October 5.--Regiment moved about two miles to the left of the Atlantic and Western Railroad, and encamped near the large post on the Marietta road. October 9.--Moved about two miles further to the left, and encamped near the Sandtown road. October 11.--Marched off on Decatur road, in a south-easterly direction; afterward struck off to right, on road to Flat Rock, halting at eight P. M., near South River, a distance of fifteen miles. October 12.--Crossed South-River at Clark's Mill, Flat Roc
October 6th (search for this): chapter 64
eport. headquarters sixty-First Ohio volunteer infantry, near Savannah, Georgia, December 26, 1864. Captain A. E. Lee, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Brigade, First Division, Twentieth Army Corps: Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Sixty-first Ohio volunteers from the occupation of Atlanta to the capture of Savannah by the National forces. Entered Atlanta September fourth, and occupied the intrenchments of the enemy. On October sixth, was assigned to a position on Peach Tree Creek road. During our stay at this place accompanied two foraging expeditions: the first, under command of Colonel Robinson, to Flat Rock, Georgia; and the second, under command of Brigadier-General Geary, to Stone Mountain; the object being to procure subsistence for the men and animals of the corps. Started on the recent campaign November fifteenth, following the line of the Augusta Railroad as far as Madison, where we turned southward and st
October 8th (search for this): chapter 64
shed daily large details for working-parties on the fortifications. The Thirty-third Massachusetts volunteers formed part of the provost-guard of the city, and rejoined the brigade at Milledgeville, on the twenty-third of November. On the eighth of October, the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin volunteers was detached from the brigade to Colonel F. C. Smith, One Hundred and Second Illinois volunteers, commanding First brigade at the railroad bridge, across the Chattahoochee River, and rejoined the brigaieth Army Corps: sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of operations required by circular of twenty-third instant: Having pitched camp in Atlanta the fourth of September, my regiment remained there in peace and quiet till October eighth, when, pursuant to orders received the night before, I marched it to the Chattahoochee Railroad bridge, there reporting to Colonel F. C. Smith, commanding post. Here we remained as part of the garrison until November fourteenth, when, having
October 9th (search for this): chapter 64
n the right of the brigade. Very large details of from eighty to one hundred men from the regiment worked daily on the interior line of defences of the city. October 9 to 10, inclusive.--Remained in same position. October 11.--Marched, at five o'clock A. M., on a foraging expedition to Flat Rock, a distance of sixteen miles.ilroad. October 5.--Regiment moved about two miles to the left of the Atlantic and Western Railroad, and encamped near the large post on the Marietta road. October 9.--Moved about two miles further to the left, and encamped near the Sandtown road. October 11.--Marched off on Decatur road, in a south-easterly direction; aftsumed command of the brigade, in the absence of Colonel Harrison, on the eighteenth September, when Lieutenant-Colonel Dutton commanded the regiment, until the ninth October, when, having received leave of absence, he left for Illinois; since his absence I have had command. While lying at the river, frequent details were made for
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