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at last reached the end of Johnston's troops, I answered: Attack! The order was promptly obeyed. The men sprang forward and made charges and a vigorous assault. I found Johnston's front covered by strong intrenchments. A drawing back of the trenches like a traverse had deceived us. Johnston had forestalled us, and was on hand fully prepared. In the first desperate charge, Hazen's brigade was in front. R. W. Johnson's division was in echelon with Wood's, somewhat to its left. Scribner's brigade was in that front. The plan had been, though not carried out, that McLean's brigade of Schofield's command, which was the intended support on our right, should show itself clearly on open ground, attract the attention of the enemy to that part of the line, while Wood and Johnson moved upon what was supposed to be the extreme right of the Confederates' position. In this conflict Wood, the division commander, during this gloomy day met with a loss similar to mine. An officer, M
Frank T. Sherman (search for this): chapter 2.32
ed to break Johnston's line near its center. Sherman had hoped to seize the railroad south of Allas it was undertaken. He firmly believed that Sherman was feeling for his right. He therefore withenth Corps (about 5,000 men) was sent back by Sherman to strengthen McPherson's command, because Mc Thus matters remained until June 1st, when Sherman's characteristic movement from right to left y had had a few days before. On June 14th, Sherman, after reconnoitering the lines of the enemy one from Pine Top. In this way the story that Sherman himself had fired the gun that killed Polk, wnt. Just before Johnston left Muddy Creek, Sherman declared: His (Johnston's) left was his weak right, he would have done a wise act, and! (Sherman) was compelled to presume that such was his oI was much annoyed, and as soon as Thomas and Sherman heard of the break they were. also worried. the Bald Knob and restored the continuity of Sherman's front. The concentration of Johnston's f[8 more...]
J. A. Sladen (search for this): chapter 2.32
olonel, can't you now rush your men forward and seize that Bald Knob He answered: Yes, sir, I can. I then said: Go ahead! He sounded the advance and all the men of the Fifteenth Ohio Infantry sprang forward, and, at a run, within fifteen minutes had crowned the knoll. It was Colonel Frank Askew, and he had done with 200 men what I had intended Nodine to do with his entire brigade. Leaving orders for Nodine and Kirby to hurry up their brigades, I mounted and, followed by McDonald and Sladen, galloped to the front and stayed there with the gallant Fifteenth Ohio men till the reinforcements with shovels and picks had joined them. The suddenness of our charge and the quickness of our riflemen cleared the Bald Knob and restored the continuity of Sherman's front. The concentration of Johnston's forces compelled us at this time to be on the lookout for just such offensive movements. Before, however, bringing our troops forward into immediate contact with the Kenesaw barricades
Joseph A. Sladen (search for this): chapter 2.32
leveland, Tenn., where good air and good nursing brought him so near to recovery that he joined me again during this campaign at Jonesboro. I think Harry Stinson was the most unselfish man I ever saw, was the remark of another of my aids, Captain J. A. Sladen. Wood's division was at last drawn out of the marching column and formed in lines of brigades facing the enemy's works, one behind the other; while R. W. Johnson's division passed beyond Wood's and came up near his left for support. Thg field work, just in the edge of heavy timber near his left and well to the front, whence he could shell the enemy now intrenched on the Knob. Very early, with a couple of staff officers, my faithful orderly, McDonald, and private secretary, J. A. Sladen, Thirty-third Massachusetts (afterwards my aid-de-camp), I rode to the four-gun battery; leaving my comrades I took a stand on the improvised fort where I could see and direct every move. A Confederate battery shelled us fearfully and we repl
only trending to the Confederate rear. Wood's men were badly repulsed; he had in a few minutes over 800 killed. While this attack was going on, Newton's and Stanley's divisions of my corps near New Hope Church were attempting to divert attention by a strong demonstration, but the Confederates there behind their barricades didm his right, he would have done a wise act, and! (Sherman) was compelled to presume that such was his object. On the afternoon of the 20th, Kirby's brigade of Stanley's division was holding Bald Knob, a prominent knoll in our front. The Confederates, using artillery and plenty of riflemen, suddenly, just about sundown, made aat Bald Knob on the morrow without fail. I ordered General Wood on the right of the Knob to have his left brigade (Nodine's) ready under arms before sunrise, and Stanley to have Kirby's brigade there in front and to the left of the Knob also under arms and prepared to make an assault. One of Wood's artillery officers spent the ni
Harry Stinson (search for this): chapter 2.32
missile had penetrated his lungs and made its way entirely through his body. I thought at first that my brave young friend was dead, and intense grief seized my heart, for Harry was much beloved. After a few minutes, however, by means of some stimulant, he revived and recovered consciousness. He was taken back to camp, and soon sent to Cleveland, Tenn., where good air and good nursing brought him so near to recovery that he joined me again during this campaign at Jonesboro. I think Harry Stinson was the most unselfish man I ever saw, was the remark of another of my aids, Captain J. A. Sladen. Wood's division was at last drawn out of the marching column and formed in lines of brigades facing the enemy's works, one behind the other; while R. W. Johnson's division passed beyond Wood's and came up near his left for support. This was far beyond Schofield's left. Wood touched a large clearing, turned to the southeast, and moved forward, keeping in the edge of the clearing, towar
Harry M. Stinson (search for this): chapter 2.32
halt and the direct preparation for a charge, I was standing in the edge of a wood, and with my glass following along the lines of Johnston, to see where the batteries were located and to ascertain if we had reached his limits. My aid, Captain Harry M. Stinson, stepped boldly into the opening. He had a new field glass, and here was an excellent opportunity to try it. I had warned him and the other officers of my staff against the danger of exposure, for we were not more than 700 yards from the hostile intrenchments. Stinson had hardly raised his glass to his forehead when a bullet struck him. He fell to the ground upon his face, and as I turned toward him I saw that there was a bullet hole through the back of his coat. The missile had penetrated his lungs and made its way entirely through his body. I thought at first that my brave young friend was dead, and intense grief seized my heart, for Harry was much beloved. After a few minutes, however, by means of some stimulant, h
is way was contested by skirmishing Confederates, but now, slowly and steadily, without general battle, the enemy was forced back to a partially new intrenched position, south of Allatoona Creek, back as far as the forks of the Dallas-Ackworth road. Here, charging across the creek in a terrific thunderstorm, Schofield's men forced their way close up to the Confederate works. They were as near to them as 250 yards, tenaciously holding the ground gained and actively intrenching. Meanwhile, Stoneman, beyond Schofield, with his cavalry had already seized the village of Allatoona, near the pass, getting there June 1st, where, taking a strong position, the work of repairing the railroad northward and southward began, and progressed with little or no opposition. At the time Schofield and Hooker were steadily advancing, Thomas was also moving the rest of us to the left from the vicinity of Pickett's Mill, Thomas being on the lead himself with Baird's division. Thomas's army in this effo
Dallas, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.32
ly parallel to ours between four and five miles, from near Dallas on his left to the vicinity of Pickett's Mill on his rightompleting their deployments extending from McPherson, near Dallas, toward Johnston's right, and this unfolding brought us st gave us more openings in the forests on all approaches to Dallas than at New Hope or Pickett's Mill. Still, the greater pahich were easily fortified and hard to take. Hardee, at Dallas, had in his vicinity a grand military position, which it w active, extended and thoroughly protected Dodge's left at Dallas. Meanwhile, John A. Logan, commanding the Fifteenth Corpslight troops far off to the right beyond the crossroads at Dallas. Logan's and Dodge's advance, substantially two heavyher against Johnston's right flank, and that the battle of Dallas, whether by General Johnston's orders or not, was a correso left began again in good earnest, and McPherson left the Dallas line and marched over beyond us all to relieve and support
Jonesboro (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2.32
ack of his coat. The missile had penetrated his lungs and made its way entirely through his body. I thought at first that my brave young friend was dead, and intense grief seized my heart, for Harry was much beloved. After a few minutes, however, by means of some stimulant, he revived and recovered consciousness. He was taken back to camp, and soon sent to Cleveland, Tenn., where good air and good nursing brought him so near to recovery that he joined me again during this campaign at Jonesboro. I think Harry Stinson was the most unselfish man I ever saw, was the remark of another of my aids, Captain J. A. Sladen. Wood's division was at last drawn out of the marching column and formed in lines of brigades facing the enemy's works, one behind the other; while R. W. Johnson's division passed beyond Wood's and came up near his left for support. This was far beyond Schofield's left. Wood touched a large clearing, turned to the southeast, and moved forward, keeping in the edge
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