hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Stonewall Jackson 1,296 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 788 0 Browse Search
Fitz Lee 718 4 Browse Search
James Longstreet 581 1 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 529 1 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 513 5 Browse Search
Richard S. Ewell 426 4 Browse Search
A. P. Hill 410 4 Browse Search
J. E. B. Stuart 362 0 Browse Search
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) 361 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). Search the whole document.

Found 571 total hits in 178 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
rnestly addressed by Hon. John Randolph Tucker, Hon. A. H. H. Stuart and others, in reference to supplying the wants of Lee's army. The meeting was quite enthusiastic, and a large subscription of supplies and money was promptly made by those present. On the 28th of February the enemy was reported as again marching up the Valley with a large force, rumor saying that it was Hancock with 20,000 men. Its advance reached Mt. Jackson the night of the 27th and approached Harrisonburg late on the 28th. Great excitement prevailed in Staunton, military stores were removed and arrangements made for breaking up camp. Many citizens left for places of greater safety. On the 1st of March, General Early broke camp at Staunton and the last train left for the east at 4:30 p. m., just after Early and his staff left Waynesboro, where the army had been ordered to concentrate. The enemy came on rapidly, driving before it the small force of cavalry that opposed its progress, capturing the wagons and
On the 22d he retired from Saltville. Burbridge's portion of his command then returned westward, by the way of Pound gap, on the 27th, to Catlettsburg, at the mouth of the Big Sandy in Kentucky, and Gillem's command returned to Knoxville on the 29th, reporting that it had marched 461 miles during this expedition, in intensely cold and inclement weather. The damage inflicted upon southwest Virginia by this Federal. raid, in the destruction of railway and turnpike bridges, railway stationsy, and issued an address to all the people, calling on them to abide by the laws; the sheriff was also ordered to go on with the collection of taxes. Many men of the soldier element were still in a state of uncertainty as to what to do. On the 29th, about 2 o'clock in the afternoon, some 800 Federal soldiers marched into Staunton and went into camp near the city. They were very quiet and disturbed no one. Generals Rosser and William L. Jackson, who were in Staunton, left in the morning of t
son's cross-roads, Payne's mill, Salem church, the Louisa road and Goodall's tavern, Ashland was reached and bivouac taken at 11 p. m., the enemy having been driven from that place about dark, by a force from Richmond. On the 16th Rosser moved toward Hanover Court House. On the 27th of March the brigades of Jackson and Imboden, returning to the lower Valley, reached Churchville, eight miles northwest of Staunton, having turned back from following after Sheridan at Hanover Junction. On the 30th, Gen. L. L. Lomax was ordered to take command of the Valley district. On April 3d rumors reached Staunton, first that Richmond had been evacuated, and second that the Federals were again coming up the Valley, and that some 300 had reached Woodstock, but that Col. C. T. O'Ferrall had attacked these in their camp at Hawkinstown and routed them. Lomax at once impressed teams to haul his stores to Lexington. On the 4th the enemy advanced to Fisher's Hill and on the 5th to Maurertown, the Con
ld camp near Swoope's. On the 18th of January, Echols' old brigade of Wharton's division, left for Dublin Depot in southwest Virginia, and McCausland's came to Fishersville, en route to its winter quarters in Alleghany and Greenbrier counties. On the 20th, Jackson's cavalry came, from toward Gordonsville, on its way to winter quarters in Bath and adjacent counties. On the 22d the Federal cavalry captured Early's picket at Edenburg, but was repulsed and the picket retaken. The month of January was very cold and stormy, with intervals of thawing which broke up the roads and made traveling very difficult. On the 2d of February, two battalions of artillery, under Col. Thomas L. Carter, left the vicinity of Waynesboro and went to Richmond. On the 7th snow fell to the depth of eight inches, interrupting railway communication. On the 8th, Payne's brigade received orders to cross the Blue ridge, from Lexington, where it had gone into camp. There was sadness at headquarters on hear
January 7th (search for this): chapter 30
the disposition, in widely scattered camps of a few cavalrymen at each place, many miles from headquarters, with numerous intervening mountains and streams to cross, when Sheridan began his second Valley campaign, starting from Winchester on the 27th of February, 1865. Rosser's expedition to Beverly, western Virginia, was one of the striking episodes of the early part of the year 1865. Leaving his camp, near Swoope's, on the Virginia Central railroad, eight miles west of Staunton, on January 7th, he crossed the Big North, Shenandoah, Shaw's ridge and Bull Pasture mountains, and encamped that night at McDowell, on the Bull Pasture river. On the 8th, crossing Jackson's River mountain, passing through Monterey and crossing the Alleghany mountain, he encamped at Yeager's, on the Back Alleghany, near the old encampment of Gen. Edward Johnson during the previous winter. On the 9th, crossing Greenbrier river and the Cheat mountains and river, he encamped at Stipe's, near the western f
January 18th (search for this): chapter 30
le Rosser's brigade, composed of the Eleventh, Twelfth and Seventh Virginia cavalry regiments and the Eighth Virginia of Payne's brigade, moved farther to the right and attacked the northern side of the camp. The attack was a complete surprise and success. After caring for his prisoners, destroying the encampment and recuperating his command, on the morning of the 11th, Rosser, later in the day, started upon his return. and on the 18th reached his old camp near Swoope's. On the 18th of January, Echols' old brigade of Wharton's division, left for Dublin Depot in southwest Virginia, and McCausland's came to Fishersville, en route to its winter quarters in Alleghany and Greenbrier counties. On the 20th, Jackson's cavalry came, from toward Gordonsville, on its way to winter quarters in Bath and adjacent counties. On the 22d the Federal cavalry captured Early's picket at Edenburg, but was repulsed and the picket retaken. The month of January was very cold and stormy, with inter
February 2nd (search for this): chapter 30
nia, and McCausland's came to Fishersville, en route to its winter quarters in Alleghany and Greenbrier counties. On the 20th, Jackson's cavalry came, from toward Gordonsville, on its way to winter quarters in Bath and adjacent counties. On the 22d the Federal cavalry captured Early's picket at Edenburg, but was repulsed and the picket retaken. The month of January was very cold and stormy, with intervals of thawing which broke up the roads and made traveling very difficult. On the 2d of February, two battalions of artillery, under Col. Thomas L. Carter, left the vicinity of Waynesboro and went to Richmond. On the 7th snow fell to the depth of eight inches, interrupting railway communication. On the 8th, Payne's brigade received orders to cross the Blue ridge, from Lexington, where it had gone into camp. There was sadness at headquarters on hearing of the defeat of the Second corps near Petersburg, and of the death of Gen. John Pegram, commanding one of its divisions, who had
February 24th (search for this): chapter 30
headquarters on hearing of the defeat of the Second corps near Petersburg, and of the death of Gen. John Pegram, commanding one of its divisions, who had begun his military career at Rich mountain in the early part of July, 1861. On the 9th, Gen. Fitz Lee left for Richmond On the 20th a portion of the general hospital of the army, which had so long been located at Staunton, was removed to Richmond, and on the 22d the Churchville company of cavalry also marched for Petersburg. On the 24th of February, Major-Generals Crook and Kelley, of the Federal army, were brought as prisoners to Staunton, by a squad of McNeill's company of partisan rangers, having been boldly and adroitly captured from their beds at Cumberland, Md., in the midst of an army of 5,000 men, and brought out on the night of the 21st, mounted on their own horses. General Early interviewed these two Federal officers, and General Crook, who was in command of the Federal army at the battle of Cedar Creek, on the morning
February 27th (search for this): chapter 30
ut on the night of the 21st, mounted on their own horses. General Early interviewed these two Federal officers, and General Crook, who was in command of the Federal army at the battle of Cedar Creek, on the morning of September 9th, in the absence of General Sherman, confessed to him that the Sixth corps was as badly damaged, or nearly so, as were the Eighth and Ninth, by Early's attack, and was, in his opinion, in no condition to resist a third attack, if such had been made. On the 27th of February, the regular monthly court day of Augusta county, there was a large meeting of the citizens of the city and county, which was earnestly addressed by Hon. John Randolph Tucker, Hon. A. H. H. Stuart and others, in reference to supplying the wants of Lee's army. The meeting was quite enthusiastic, and a large subscription of supplies and money was promptly made by those present. On the 28th of February the enemy was reported as again marching up the Valley with a large force, rumor say
February 28th (search for this): chapter 30
opinion, in no condition to resist a third attack, if such had been made. On the 27th of February, the regular monthly court day of Augusta county, there was a large meeting of the citizens of the city and county, which was earnestly addressed by Hon. John Randolph Tucker, Hon. A. H. H. Stuart and others, in reference to supplying the wants of Lee's army. The meeting was quite enthusiastic, and a large subscription of supplies and money was promptly made by those present. On the 28th of February the enemy was reported as again marching up the Valley with a large force, rumor saying that it was Hancock with 20,000 men. Its advance reached Mt. Jackson the night of the 27th and approached Harrisonburg late on the 28th. Great excitement prevailed in Staunton, military stores were removed and arrangements made for breaking up camp. Many citizens left for places of greater safety. On the 1st of March, General Early broke camp at Staunton and the last train left for the east at 4:3
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...