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September 1st (search for this): chapter 11
ted to it. The compensation for keeping fires and sweeping at Milk Row, Prospect Hill, and Winter Hill was fixed at twenty cents per week. This year, 1837, we have the first mention of an annual vacation, to begin August 17 and to continue to September 1. About this time the trustees voted to consider the advisability of discarding the New Testament as a reading book for the second class in the primary grades. Voted that teachers be allowed to sell books and stationery to their scholars. Min with it the first of June, 1838. Voted that the board attend the convention at Lowell Monday, July 27, and that teachers of the grammar schools be invited to attend with us. Voted that a male teacher be elected for Winter Hill, to begin September 1, and continue until May 1. James Hovey received the appointment. Amos F. Allen was elected to the Prospect Hill school, Levi (should be Philemon R.) Russell to the Russell school, William R. Bagnall to Gardner Row, and Joel Pierce to the Mil
chool is opened, no scholar shall be admitted without written excuse from his parent or guardian. Each school is divided into four classes, sub-divisions to be left to the teacher. The holidays shall be Wednesday and Saturday afternoons; Election Day in January; Fast Day and the day after examinations in April; Monday, June 1, and June 17; July 4; in August, the time of meeting of the American Institute of Instruction and the day bf Commencement at Harvard; the day after examinations in October; Thanksgiving Day; Christmas Day. These rules are to, be enforced in the schools outside the Neck so far as is advisable. This year, also, changes were made in the curriculum, and the following list was authorized and approved:— Fourth class, primary, alphabetical charts, words of two syllables. Third class, Introduction to the National Spelling Book, Worcester's Second Book. Second class, Emerson's National Spelling Book, Easy Reader, Worcester's Second Book. First class, the
October 1st (search for this): chapter 11
punctual and constant are retarded in their progress. The remedy is alone with the parents. The Rules and Regulations for the Government of the Charlestown Free Schools, adopted by the Board of Trustees, and bearing the date, January 1, 1833, is of interest at this point. After stating the age at which children may attend the primary and the grammar schools (from four to eight, and from eight to fifteen), the hours for the school session are given,—8 to 11 and 2 to 5, from April 1 to October 1; 9 to 12 and 2 to 5 during the other half year, except on short days, when the Schools may be closed at sunset. Instructors are to be in their rooms and to ring the bell ten minutes before the time of opening school. After the school is opened, no scholar shall be admitted without written excuse from his parent or guardian. Each school is divided into four classes, sub-divisions to be left to the teacher. The holidays shall be Wednesday and Saturday afternoons; Election Day in Januar
October 24th (search for this): chapter 11
chool to manage. A petition signed by Alfred Allen and others was circulated for her removal, but the trustees voted to sustain the teacher. They feel bound to say that their confidence in the talents, deportment, and qualifications of Miss Locke remain undiminished. They recommend that she continue in the school and be encouraged in the arduous duties assigned her. (Signed by Joseph T. Tufts and Charles Thompson.) We read of no further trouble, and her school was examined in its turn, October 24, at 9 o'clock. The winter schools outside the Neck were assigned as follows: At Milk Row to Luther (should be Calvin) Farrar; at Winter Hill to A. B. Magoun; at the Russell district to Henry I. Jewett; at the Gardner school to William E. Faulkner. As Mr. Magoun did not accept, Henry Bulfinch was appointed. Paul Willard, who signed the annual report, says: It would be unjust to; withhold an expression of the belief that the three high schools within the Neck, under the care of five mast
Kezia Russell was appointed to teach the summer term in the Russell district, and Miss Abby Mead at Winter Hill. For the winter term the appointments were: Aaron B. Magoun to the Winter Hill school for six months, beginning the first Monday in November, at $32 per month; and H. K. Curtis for the Russell district, four months, at $30. The care of the outside schools was assigned to Messrs. Adams and Hawkins for the trustees. At a special meeting held June 20, 1833, it was voted that teachers onroe, a lot of land suitable for which will be presented to the town by said Munroe and C. Harrington, and may be erected for $500. Messrs. Allen, Underwood, and Thompson are empowered to get a deed of this land and to build thereon. Later (in November) this section of Milk Row received the name of the Prospect Hill district, and $600 was appropriated for the building. The committee in charge of this school were instructed not to allow the children of John Runey to remain at the school unless
November 30th (search for this): chapter 11
These schools were assigned to the charge of Messrs. Hazeltine and Allen for the trustees. Among bills approved was that of A. W. Whittredge for $52.50. The winter terms were to be taught by Norwood Damon at the Russell, Edward Wyman at Winter Hill, Timothy P. Rogers at the Gardner, and Miss Ann Whipple was appointed for the Milk Row school, at the same compensation as was given last winter to a male teacher. In the annual report Miss Whipple was highly commended. As Mr. Damon resigned November 30, Mr. (Samuel?) Swan was put in his place. The primary school occupied by Ann W. Locke, having been burned in the late conflagration (Monday, August 31, 1835?), was repaired. It was voted April 16, 1836, to insert in the next town warrant an article to see whether the town will establish a high school agreeable to sections 5 and 7 of the twenty-third chapter of the Revised Statutes. Many changes among the teachers are reported this year, but their names are not mentioned on the reco
December 11th (search for this): chapter 11
n was elected to the Prospect Hill school, Levi (should be Philemon R.) Russell to the Russell school, William R. Bagnall to Gardner Row, and Joel Pierce to the Milk Row school. November 15, 1838, an attempt was made to arrange the boundaries between the Bunker Hill and Winter Hill districts. This is the first time I find mention of a Bunker Hill district. March 18, 1839, the trustees passed a vote that the Neck school hereafter be called the Bunker Hill school. A month before this, December 11, Benjamin F. Tweed was chosen to succeed William D. Swan at this school. A petition from Charles Adams and others residing on the top of Winter Hill for establishing a primary school there, and requesting the board to present the same to the town in their annual report, was presented by Mr. Forster. Mr. Allen presented a report of the examination of the Winter Hill school, which was ordered to be placed on file. A petition from Clark Bennett and William Bonner to have the lines of the
December 20th (search for this): chapter 11
not exceeding six, and to receive compensation there from. Messrs. Runey and Hawkins are empowered to attend to the schools outside the Neck, the same as last year. They engage for the winter term Miles Gardner, for the Gardner school; Elliot Valentine, for Winter Hill; and Joseph S. Hastings, for the Russell district. In September Mr. Walker resigned at the Neck, to go to the Hawes school, South Boston, and Amos P. Baker was elected to succeed him. The death of Mr. Baker was reported December 20, and Aaron D. Capen was placed over this school. Through Amos Tufts and David Devens, Esq., executors of the will of Deacon Thomas Miller, the trustees received $100, the income of Which was to be used for the schools. Voted that the school recess shall not exceed ten minutes; that the trustees supply Mr. Fairbanks' school with three dozen slates; that all lady teachers in the primary schools be allowed nine afternoons in the course of the year to visit all the other primary schools;
December 25th (search for this): chapter 11
all be admitted without written excuse from his parent or guardian. Each school is divided into four classes, sub-divisions to be left to the teacher. The holidays shall be Wednesday and Saturday afternoons; Election Day in January; Fast Day and the day after examinations in April; Monday, June 1, and June 17; July 4; in August, the time of meeting of the American Institute of Instruction and the day bf Commencement at Harvard; the day after examinations in October; Thanksgiving Day; Christmas Day. These rules are to, be enforced in the schools outside the Neck so far as is advisable. This year, also, changes were made in the curriculum, and the following list was authorized and approved:— Fourth class, primary, alphabetical charts, words of two syllables. Third class, Introduction to the National Spelling Book, Worcester's Second Book. Second class, Emerson's National Spelling Book, Easy Reader, Worcester's Second Book. First class, the New Testament, Emerson's Nati
December 30th (search for this): chapter 11
liam D. Swan was put in charge of this school. All three teachers received a salary of $650, which was raised to $700 later on. About the time which we are considering, the school for girls, which had been at the Training Field, was transferred to the Town Hill side, and the boys' school at the latter place now occupied the newer and more commodious building at the Training Field. I find no mention of this change previous to the spring of 1834, but it may have been earlier than that. December 30 it is voted that the seats in the primary schools are to have convenient backs added to them, but that the seats in the upper schools remain unaltered. March 31, 1834, a petition that James Swan be discharged from his school, signed by Bradbury Follet and others, was received and placed on file. From the annual report read in town meeting that May, we learn that the average number of pupils in the ten primary grades is seventy to a teacher; that the Female school, now on Town Hill, wi
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