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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907. Search the whole document.

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r, Lydia A. Skilton. The permanent funds of the trustees of Charlestown schools in 1834 were:— 35 shares of Union bank stock$3,500 Town note on interest1,200 Deacon Miller's legacy100 Two primary schools, valued at600 ———– $5,400 1835-1836. The teachers for the summer schools beyond the peninsula were Miss Ann E. Whipple for Milk Row, Miss Abby Mead for Winter Hill, Miss Kezia Russell for the Russell, and Miss Anna B. Mead for the Gardner. These schools were assigned to the charnhabitants in the north section of the town. The boy who rings it has to go some distance. He is consequently unable to return on time to commence his studies with the rest of his class. It is also an interruption to the female department. 1836-1837. The teachers for this summer outside the peninsula were: Miss Abby Mead, of the Winter Hill school; Miss Ann E. Whipple, of the Milk Row; Miss Burnham of the Russell; and Miss Wyman, of the Gardner. In accordance with the vote of the to
April 16th, 1836 AD (search for this): chapter 11
n at the Russell, Edward Wyman at Winter Hill, Timothy P. Rogers at the Gardner, and Miss Ann Whipple was appointed for the Milk Row school, at the same compensation as was given last winter to a male teacher. In the annual report Miss Whipple was highly commended. As Mr. Damon resigned November 30, Mr. (Samuel?) Swan was put in his place. The primary school occupied by Ann W. Locke, having been burned in the late conflagration (Monday, August 31, 1835?), was repaired. It was voted April 16, 1836, to insert in the next town warrant an article to see whether the town will establish a high school agreeable to sections 5 and 7 of the twenty-third chapter of the Revised Statutes. Many changes among the teachers are reported this year, but their names are not mentioned on the records. There were now twelve primary schools with an enrollment of 802 scholars, or nearly sixty-seven on an average for each teacher. The Male school had 228, the Female 211, and the Neck schools, both ma
n time to commence his studies with the rest of his class. It is also an interruption to the female department. 1836-1837. The teachers for this summer outside the peninsula were: Miss Abby Mead, of the Winter Hill school; Miss Ann E. Whipple, can be made for $2,600, and it is so recommended. (Signed) Charles Thompson, president; Thomas Brown, Jr., secretary. 1837-1838. The summer schools beyond the Neck, for this season, were under the following instructors: Miss Ann P. Whipple, ofor keeping fires and sweeping at Milk Row, Prospect Hill, and Winter Hill was fixed at twenty cents per week. This year, 1837, we have the first mention of an annual vacation, to begin August 17 and to continue to September 1. About this time theo. 13, at the Point, in a room hired of Mr. Ferrin, is kept by Miss Battles. No. 14, at Moulton's Point, established in 1837, is in a new house erected by the board on a lot belonging to the town. The teachers there have been Mrs. M. H. Dupee and
January 30th, 1837 AD (search for this): chapter 11
Hill. The three last-named received $35 per month. Evidently the new school did not start under the most favorable auspices. The teacher was requested to vacate on the last day of March, and Levi Russell, who had finished his own school, was hired to finish out the term at Prospect Hill. The last weeks of the winter term at Winter Hill school were taught by Miss Abby Mead, who received $17.50 therefor. She respectfully declined her appointment to the school for the next summer. January 30, 1837, Dr. Valentine is authorized to visit the schools and see that all children are vaccinated. He is to present his bill for payment when parents are unable to pay. This vote was passed in consequence of finding that a large number of scholars had never been vaccinated. It was also voted that no children should be admitted into any free school of Charlestown without vaccination certificates, and that no unvaccinated child should be allowed to remain in school after February 13, 1837.
February 13th, 1837 AD (search for this): chapter 11
January 30, 1837, Dr. Valentine is authorized to visit the schools and see that all children are vaccinated. He is to present his bill for payment when parents are unable to pay. This vote was passed in consequence of finding that a large number of scholars had never been vaccinated. It was also voted that no children should be admitted into any free school of Charlestown without vaccination certificates, and that no unvaccinated child should be allowed to remain in school after February 13, 1837. From the annual report, read at the May town meeting, we learn that an average of eleven per cent., or over 200 scholars, have been absent from school the past year. This is the cause of moist of the corporal punishment which is inflicted in the schools, as those absent acquire habits which are altogether incompatible with order and discipline. The whole number of scholars on the rolls is 1,781, of whom 294 are in the five districts without the peninsula. The cupola has been rem
February 23rd, 1837 AD (search for this): chapter 11
return on time to commence his studies with the rest of his class. It is also an interruption to the female department. 1836-1837. The teachers for this summer outside the peninsula were: Miss Abby Mead, of the Winter Hill school; Miss Ann E. Whipple, of the Milk Row; Miss Burnham of the Russell; and Miss Wyman, of the Gardner. In accordance with the vote of the town, Messrs. Warren and Valentine were requested to look up the law relating to the establishment of high schools. February 23, 1837, they reported in favor of such a school, and their report was presented at the next town meeting. The formation of a new district school in Milk Row by a division of the district, as referred to the trustees by the town, was next referred to Messrs. Allen and Underwood as a special committee to consider the matter and report later. They found, May 30, that the number of scholars warrants a division of said district, commencing at a point in the Russell district, thence running eas
April 17th, 1837 AD (search for this): chapter 11
are in the five districts without the peninsula. The cupola has been removed from the schoolhouse on Town Hill, and a new one erected on the school at the Training Field. This year assistant teachers have been appointed in all the grammar schools. This will enable the masters to dispense altogether with monitors, and to see that the younger members of the school receive a proper share of attention. (Charlotte Cutter was one of these assistants. Her services at the Neck school began April 17, 1837.) In conclusion, the report says that evidently another school must be established and a building erected. Such improvements can be made for $2,600, and it is so recommended. (Signed) Charles Thompson, president; Thomas Brown, Jr., secretary. 1837-1838. The summer schools beyond the Neck, for this season, were under the following instructors: Miss Ann P. Whipple, of the Prospect Hill school; Rachel T. Stevens, of the Milk Row school; Miss Marv B. Gardner, of the Russell school;,
May, 1837 AD (search for this): chapter 11
1838, a union exhibition of the first classes of the three upper schools was held in the Town Hall. It was a great pleasure to a large audience. Of the three high schools, the Bunker Hill (Neck) is for both sexes. William D. Swan, the principal, goes to Boston, and will be succeeded by Benjamin F. Tweed. The assistant is Miss Charlotte Cutter. The Harvard school, on Town Hill, is for girls. The teachers here are Paul Sweetser and Charles Kimball. (His term of service began before May, 1837.) Assistants: Miss M. E. Jones, Miss C. A. Johnson, Miss Fernald. The Winthrop school at the Training Field is for boys, the teachers being Mr. Bates and Samuel Swan, and for assistants, Miss Symmes and Miss Hay. Expenses appended to the trustees' report of May, 1839:— The bills for repairs in Russell district went beyond the appropriation. R. G. Tenney, for work$210.74 Benjamin Track, for work4.00 Moses Bacon, for work34.00 The auditors of all bills that came before the tr
building erected. Such improvements can be made for $2,600, and it is so recommended. (Signed) Charles Thompson, president; Thomas Brown, Jr., secretary. 1837-1838. The summer schools beyond the Neck, for this season, were under the following instructors: Miss Ann P. Whipple, of the Prospect Hill school; Rachel T. Stevens, Russell district. The building has not been repaired since its erection: the seats and benches are in bad condition, and the whole interior needs refitting. 1838-1839. The teachers of the district schools this season were: Mary W. J. Evans, of the Gardner; Clara D. Whittemore, of the Russell; Sarah M. Burnham, of Milk Row;e vestry of the Methodist meeting house, is kept by Miss Charlotte A. Sawyer. No. 4, in School street, kept by Miss Susan L. Sawyer, before the end of the year (1838) had an offshoot taken from it, which was put under Miss Esther M. Hay. An examination of both was held in Boylston chapel. No. 5. This school is kept by Miss
June 1st, 1838 AD (search for this): chapter 11
guous to the Neck who wished to attend the Neck school. It was they who had charge of the repairs made during the summer at the Russell school. It was voted that the summer vacations this year be the first week in June and the last two weeks in August, and that the district schools be allowed a vacation every Wednesday afternoon during the summer. Voted that the form of Register received from the secretary of the Board of Education be adopted, and that the teachers begin with it the first of June, 1838. Voted that the board attend the convention at Lowell Monday, July 27, and that teachers of the grammar schools be invited to attend with us. Voted that a male teacher be elected for Winter Hill, to begin September 1, and continue until May 1. James Hovey received the appointment. Amos F. Allen was elected to the Prospect Hill school, Levi (should be Philemon R.) Russell to the Russell school, William R. Bagnall to Gardner Row, and Joel Pierce to the Milk Row school. Novembe
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