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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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orrow to elect 10 delegates to meet at Montgomery, Ala., on the 4th of February, in a Convention, to which all the Southern States are invited. The special ordinance, declaring the African slave trade piracy, was amended so as not to declare it piracy, and to substitute imprisonment in the penitentiary and for death. As amended, it passed unanimously. An ordinance for the continuance of the present postal revenues until another government is re- established, was referred. Judge Benning offered an ordinance continuing the present laws about inter-State slave trade; also, a resolution appointing Commissioners to all the slaveholding States. Mr. Cobb reported an ordinance revoking the Federal jurisdiction over all lands ceded, and authorizing payment for all forts, arsenals, and other government property within the limits of Georgia. Laid over. It is generally conceded that Senator Toombs and Hon. Howell Cobb, will be appointed representatives to the Montgomery
way to all the people of the State, shall continue to be such." These repeated and emphatic prohibitions have estopped the passage of any title by the register for any such lands in the East since 1780, and in the West since 1802, which reunited migranted by the Colonial Government. The Auditor of Public Accounts alludes to the subject in his recent communication to the General Assembly, and we insert his concluding remarks, as they possess local interest. He says: "In 1675 Governor Berkeley granted William Byrd 7,351 acres of land on the north side of the James River, beginning at the mouth of Shockoe Creek, and running up said river; and in 1687 William Byrd obtained a grant of 956 acres on the north side of said river, beginning at the mouth of Shockoe Creek, and running down said river. --Neither grant appears to include either the banks or beds of the said James River or Shockoe Creek, nor the islands in James River opposite and near the city of Richmond. The channel
A. N. Bernard (search for this): article 7
Fredericksburg. Terms --The Fredericksburg (Va.) papers of yesterday furnish the following items: We regret to learn that a sailor, by the name of James Alzon was burned to death on Wednesday night last, on board a vessel lying in the stream near the wharf. A prominent citizen of Spotsylvania, A. N. Bernard. Esq.,yesterday made a donation of $100 to wards arming and equipping the Fredericksburg Battalion. An artillery company was organized on Saturday night, 37 members--50 expected. An accomplished officer has been invited to instruct them in practice.
he law restricting the catching of fish in certain rivers and bays; by Mr. Witten, of providing for the payment of $162.70 to Witten Cecil and T. G. Perry, for law damages, assessed by a jury of Tazewell county; by Mr. Cowan, of legalizing a conveyance from Andrew Oliphant, guardian, &c., to David Simpson; by Mr. Carpenter, of amending 14th section of chapter 61 of the Code; by Mr. Watts, of refunding to Richard Cox and D. Griffith a sum of money assessed against them. Direct Trade.--Mr. Bisbie, of Norfolk, offered a resolution to the effect that the General Assembly had learned with satisfaction that Periere & Freres, Bankers, of Paris, France, contemplated putting on a line of steamers between the United States and France, and that France intended to subscribe thereto $900,000 per annum; and that Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Mississippi, Kentucky, and Maryland, had fostered schemes of internal improvement materially dependent upon direct trade: Therefore, 1st. Re
James Bolton (search for this): article 1
but not to exceed $5 per week. Fractions over the first week 71 cents per day. No extra charges except for surgical operations, and then an additional fee ranging from $2 or $30 will be charged. Bills payable on the removal of the patient. No small-pox admitted. A covered spring wagon will convey patients to and from the Hospital when desired. Orders may be left at the Hospital when desired. Orders may be left at the Hospital, or at the office of A. L. Holladay, 12th street, between Main and Cary. The subscriber, who has been connected with the institution since its foundation, having taken it under his exclusive charge, sided by competent assistants, solicits a continuance of the liberal patronage of his friends and of the public generally. Attending Physician and Surgeon. James Bolton, M. D., Grace street, between 4th and 5th. assistants: C. W. P. Brock, M. D., Church Hill, cor. 25th and Marshall sts. C. M. Hunter, Resident Physician. ja 18--1y
Solon Borland (search for this): article 13
Solon Borland and John Bell. --Solon Borland made a speech in Nashville, Thursday night. He said, in the course of his remarks, that the "Constitutional Union party," and its acknowledged champion, John Bell, had held the doctrine that the election of Lincoln would be a just cause for the dissolution of the Union. John Bell, who was in the audience, rose and denied the charge, amid the cheers of his friends. Mr. Bell, before he sat down, expressed the hope and conviction that all would Solon Borland made a speech in Nashville, Thursday night. He said, in the course of his remarks, that the "Constitutional Union party," and its acknowledged champion, John Bell, had held the doctrine that the election of Lincoln would be a just cause for the dissolution of the Union. John Bell, who was in the audience, rose and denied the charge, amid the cheers of his friends. Mr. Bell, before he sat down, expressed the hope and conviction that all would yet be well with the Union; and this declaration was received with a great shout of applause. The country will be glad to hear this from Mr. Bell and the city of Nashville.
Cyrus Bossieux (search for this): article 3
Grays --Company "A," First Regiment--held their annual meeting on Tuesday night, for the purpose of electing non-commissioned officers and transacting other business. The following is a complete list of the present officers of this gallant corps: W. M. Elliott, Captain; Louis J. Bossieux, 1st Lieutenant; J. V. Crawford. 2d Lieutenant; Randolph Harrison. 3d Lieutenant; E. W. Branch, 1st Sergeant; John B. Vaughan, 2d Sergeant; Wm. Ira Smith, 3d Sergeant; Thos. W. Pairo, 4th Sergeant; Cyrus Bossieux, 5th Sergeant; B. Howard Claiborne, Quartermaster; John T. Rogers, Ensign; J. S. Michard, 1st Corporal; Wm. H. Johnston, 2d Corporal; J. H. Mundy, 3d Corporal; Geo. W. Libby, 4th Corporal; Jas. W. Pegram, 5th Corporal; Jas. E. Phillips, 6th Corporal; Louis J. Bossieux, Treasurer; E. W. Branch, Secretary. The Grays now number 94 men. Their proficiency in drill, which has long been a subject of complimentary remark, has been perfected by the bayonet exercises, a la Zouave, and they ev
Louis J. Bossieux (search for this): article 3
ment--held their annual meeting on Tuesday night, for the purpose of electing non-commissioned officers and transacting other business. The following is a complete list of the present officers of this gallant corps: W. M. Elliott, Captain; Louis J. Bossieux, 1st Lieutenant; J. V. Crawford. 2d Lieutenant; Randolph Harrison. 3d Lieutenant; E. W. Branch, 1st Sergeant; John B. Vaughan, 2d Sergeant; Wm. Ira Smith, 3d Sergeant; Thos. W. Pairo, 4th Sergeant; Cyrus Bossieux, 5th Sergeant; B. Howard Claiborne, Quartermaster; John T. Rogers, Ensign; J. S. Michard, 1st Corporal; Wm. H. Johnston, 2d Corporal; J. H. Mundy, 3d Corporal; Geo. W. Libby, 4th Corporal; Jas. W. Pegram, 5th Corporal; Jas. E. Phillips, 6th Corporal; Louis J. Bossieux, Treasurer; E. W. Branch, Secretary. The Grays now number 94 men. Their proficiency in drill, which has long been a subject of complimentary remark, has been perfected by the bayonet exercises, a la Zouave, and they evince a settled purpose to maintai
Meeting at the African Church. In response to a call for a meeting of the working men of Richmond, to give public expression to their views in the present crisis, an immense multitude of persons assembled last night at the African Church. The proceedings were interrupted by the most boisterous yells and hisses, and the object of the meeting, whatever it might have been, was completely frustrated. A committee was appointed to wait on Mr. Botts, to invite him to address the assemblage, and that gentleman appeared; but the confusion was so great that he refused to speak. The resolutions reported by the Business Committee were raid on the table, and another series presented, but not acted on. We will publish a more detailed account of the proceedings to-morrow.
Thomas William Bowlby (search for this): article 8
Obituary of a Reporter. --Thomas William Bowlby, the correspondent of the London Times, who was killed by the Chinese near Pekin, was born in Gibraltar, but educated in England, at a county academy. Tom Taylor, the dramatist, was his chum at school.--Bowlby studied law for some time, but in 1848 was engaged by the London Times as special correspondent, and sent to various parts of the Continent, particularly Hungary. Subsequently he was connected with Jullien in his musical enterprises. with liberty to draw upon the concern to any amount that might be required for the efficient discharge of his duties. Mr. Bowlby proceeded to China in the same steamer as Lord Elgin and Baron Gros, with whom he was shipwrecked. Mr. Bowlby was abourge of his duties. Mr. Bowlby proceeded to China in the same steamer as Lord Elgin and Baron Gros, with whom he was shipwrecked. Mr. Bowlby was about forty-three years old, and has left a widow and five children, most of whom are of tender years.
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