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ny such lands in the East since 1780, and in the West since 1802, which reunited migranted by the Colonial Government. The Auditor of Public Accounts alludes to the subject in his recent communication to the General Assembly, and we insert his concluding remarks, as they possess local interest. He says: "In 1675 Governor Berkeley granted William Byrd 7,351 acres of land on the north side of the James River, beginning at the mouth of Shockoe Creek, and running up said river; and in 1687 William Byrd obtained a grant of 956 acres on the north side of said river, beginning at the mouth of Shockoe Creek, and running down said river. --Neither grant appears to include either the banks or beds of the said James River or Shockoe Creek, nor the islands in James River opposite and near the city of Richmond. The channel of Shockoe Creek within the city of Richmond has been changed by artificial means for necessary improvements. That which was at a former day the bed of Shockoe Cree
the banks, shores and beds of the rivers and creeks in the western part of the State. The 1st section of chapter 62 of the Code of Virginia, in alluding to the above recited acts, declares that "all the lands which remained ungranted by the former government, and which have been used as a common by-way to all the people of the State, shall continue to be such." These repeated and emphatic prohibitions have estopped the passage of any title by the register for any such lands in the East since 1780, and in the West since 1802, which reunited migranted by the Colonial Government. The Auditor of Public Accounts alludes to the subject in his recent communication to the General Assembly, and we insert his concluding remarks, as they possess local interest. He says: "In 1675 Governor Berkeley granted William Byrd 7,351 acres of land on the north side of the James River, beginning at the mouth of Shockoe Creek, and running up said river; and in 1687 William Byrd obtained a grant o
May, 1780 AD (search for this): article 1
Commonwealth's Lands.--The General Assembly, in May, 1780, passed an act which may be found in Henning's Statutes at Large, ch. 2, page 226, for the purpose of securing "to the public certain lands held as common. " The lands referred to were "unappropriated lands on the bay, sea and river shores, in the Eastern parts of this Commonwealth." It is further stated, that in the "act establishing a land office, and ascertaining the terms and manner of granting waste and unappropriated lands," no reservation thereof is made, but the same "is now subject to be entered for and appropriated by any person or persons, whereby the benefits formerly derived to the public therefrom will be monopolized by a few individuals, and the poor laid under contribution for exercising the accustomed privilege of fishing." For the reason stated, the lands so referred to which remained "ungranted by the former covenant," (meaning that of the English,) were excepted out of said act, and it was declar
f the English,) were excepted out of said act, and it was declared that no grant issued by the Register of the Land Office for the same thereafter should be valid to pass any estate or interest therein. A similar law was made on the 15th January, 1802, in reference to the banks, shores and beds of the rivers and creeks in the western part of the State. The 1st section of chapter 62 of the Code of Virginia, in alluding to the above recited acts, declares that "all the lands which remained ungraen used as a common by-way to all the people of the State, shall continue to be such." These repeated and emphatic prohibitions have estopped the passage of any title by the register for any such lands in the East since 1780, and in the West since 1802, which reunited migranted by the Colonial Government. The Auditor of Public Accounts alludes to the subject in his recent communication to the General Assembly, and we insert his concluding remarks, as they possess local interest. He says:
Obituary of a Reporter. --Thomas William Bowlby, the correspondent of the London Times, who was killed by the Chinese near Pekin, was born in Gibraltar, but educated in England, at a county academy. Tom Taylor, the dramatist, was his chum at school.--Bowlby studied law for some time, but in 1848 was engaged by the London Times as special correspondent, and sent to various parts of the Continent, particularly Hungary. Subsequently he was connected with Jullien in his musical enterprises. He was about a year ago re-engaged by the Times, to proceed to China as special correspondent. The terms of his agreement were £1,500 ($7,500) a year, with liberty to draw upon the concern to any amount that might be required for the efficient discharge of his duties. Mr. Bowlby proceeded to China in the same steamer as Lord Elgin and Baron Gros, with whom he was shipwrecked. Mr. Bowlby was about forty-three years old, and has left a widow and five children, most of whom are of tender years.
February 26th, 1856 AD (search for this): article 6
e Senate adjourned. House of delegates. Wednesday, Jan. 23d, 1861. The House was called to order at 12 o'clock M., by Speaker Crutchfield. Prayer by Rev. Mr. Willis, of the Baptist Church. A message from the Senate was read announcing the passage of sundry bills, some of which were taken up, read the requisite number of times, and passed, among them acts amending and re- enacting the act entitled an act to incorporate the Jackson Orphan Asylum of Norfolk, passed February 26, 1856; changing the time of holding the terms of the Circuit Courts of the counties of Hardy and Page: for the relief of Benjamin and Isaac Deford, of Morgan county; for the relief of Hugh Crolly and Patrick McCune; for the relief of Patrick H. Scott, of Halifax county; incorporating the Virginia Arms Manufacturing Company; allowing the Northwestern Bank of Virginia and any of its branches to establish an agency in the city of Richmond for the redemption of its circulating notes. Bills
Commercial.[from the London Times' City Article.] Monday Evening, Jan. 7.--The Bank of England, this morning, shortly after the commencement of business, advanced their rate of discount from 6 per cent., at which it was fixed on the 31st ult., to 7 per cent., This is higher than any point attained since the panic of 1857. The step came unexpectedly, and a few minutes previously to its notification, money was obtainable in the discount market at a fraction below the Bank terms them current. The reasons assigned for it, however or, are sufficiently important. Not only did the Asia take out a further sum of £200,000, for New York on Saturday; but the Tetonia, from Southampton this morning, has carried £ 70,000, and it may, therefore, be inferred that the City of Washington. Argo, Vigo, North Britain, Marathon, and Niagara, to sail during the week, will all, or most or them, have additional totals — especially as the accounts to-day are likely to excite the confidence of remi
illery being in use at the fort, the salute was fired with Mr. William Hone's "Baby Waker," but the lateness of the hour prevented any extensive demonstration being made. The Savannah Brass Band, Robert Low leader, composed of colored men, serenaded the Mayor, Col. Lawton, and several other citizens. Several public and private buildings were illuminated. A division of the Territory. The New York Post makes up the following from the report of the Commissioner of the Land Office for 1860: Free States. Sq. Miles. Maine35,000 New Hampshire9,200 Vermont10,212 Massachusetts7,800 Rhode Island1,306 Connecticut4,750 New York47,000 New Jersey8,300 Pennsylvania46,000 Ohio39,964 Indiana33,800 Illinois55,410 Michigan56,451 Wisconsin53,924 Iowa55,045 Minnesota83,591 Oregon95,274 California188,981 832,717 Free Territo's. Kansas126,283 Nebraska342,488 Minnesota81,960 Wash'ton.193,071 Utah220,196 963,948 Sq. miles1,795,965 Population19,000,000
January 16th, 1860 AD (search for this): article 1
By Dickinson, Hill & Co., Auct'rs. Trustee's Sale of Nine Likely Slaves.--By virtue of a deed of trust, of record in the Clerk's Office of Henrico County Court, executed on the 16th day of January, 1860, by Dandridge Hall, for a certain purpose therein mentioned, having been requested by the beneficiary therein. I shall proceed to sell at public auction, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the office of Dickinson, Hill & Co., on Saturday, the 2d day of February, at 10 o'clock, nine likely Slaves — named Billy, Davy, Ben, Bob, Eliza and one child, Adeline and her two children, or so many thereof as shall be necessary to execute the provisions of said deed. D. Baker, Jr., Trustee. Sale by Dickinson, Hill & Co., Auct'rs. ja 24--tds
February 27th, 1860 AD (search for this): article 6
The Senate was called to order at 12 o'clock. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Read, of the Presbyterian Church. A communication was received from the House announcing the passage of sundry bills, and requesting the concurrence of the Senate. Reports of Committees.--A bill to amend the charter of the Bank of Phillippi; a bill to amend the charter of the Bank of the Commonwealth; a bill amending an act incorporating the Princess Anne Savings Bank, in Princess Anne county, passed Feb. 27, 1860. Resolutions of Inquiry, &c.--The following resolutions of inquiry, &c., were adopted and referred: By Mr. Pate, of reporting a bill incorporating the Ambler Oil and Coal Company; by the same, of reporting a bill incorporating the Hughes Creek Oil and Coal Company; by the same, of reporting a bill incorporating the Fayette Oil and Coal Company; by Mr. Gatewood, petition of Fanny Mathews, for leave to enslave herself and child to Gabriel Jordan, of Page county; by Mr. Nash, of amendin
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