hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Maine (Maine, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) 16 0 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 16 0 Browse Search
Cook 14 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
January 23rd 14 14 Browse Search
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
Jamaica, L. I. (New York, United States) 12 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 1,139 total hits in 556 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
March 31st, 1860 AD (search for this): article 6
ir defaults are rapidly growing upon us. What was prophecy last session was history this.--Let us beware, lest the errors of to-day become the controlling precedents of to-morrow. At the last session we released sureties, at this we are asked to release the principal and damages; at the next we may be asked to release the debt. The bill was finally passed. Also, an act to amend the 25th section of an act entitled an act imposing taxes for the support of the Government, passed March 31, 1860; and an act to amend the 4th section of an act incorporating the Jefferson Insurance Company. The Million Appropriation.--When the Senate adjourned yesterday, the bill appropriating one million of dollars for the defence of the Commonwealth was under consideration. The bill was taken up again, when Mr. Paxton withdrew the amendment proposed by him on yesterday, and offered a substitute for the first clause, as follows: Be it enacted, by the General Assembly. That the Colonel
July 1st, 1860 AD (search for this): article 6
had passed releasing Sheriffs' securities from damages awarded against them, would be regarded as an invitation to default, with the expectation of relief here. To avoid that state of things, we required the Auditor of Public Accounts to advertise semi-annual lists of defaulting officers. At the expiration of the first six months such published list embraced some forty or fifty defaulting Sheriffs. The Enquirer of this morning gives the Auditor's list of 35 delinquent Sheriffs since 1st July, 1860, 125 delinquent clerks, and almost as many delinquent notaries public. It seemed that since we had been dispensing public charity to defaulting public officers, their defaults are rapidly growing upon us. What was prophecy last session was history this.--Let us beware, lest the errors of to-day become the controlling precedents of to-morrow. At the last session we released sureties, at this we are asked to release the principal and damages; at the next we may be asked to release the de
January 15th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 4
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.Nominations in Buckingham. Buckingham Co., Va., January 15, 1861. Our County Court came off yesterday.--Early in the morning Col. Edmund W. Hubbard was announced as a county candidate for the State Convention, to be held on the 13th of February. It is understood that Col. Hubbard is for immediate action on the part of Virginia. Later in the day, Mr. Chas. L. Christian was also announced as a county candidate for the some Convention. It is understood that Mr. Christian is in favor of further below, still hoping (against all hope) that some concessions will be made on the side of the North. There is but (little doubt about public sentiment in our county on the subject. As far as I have been able to ascertain, there will be a large majority in favor of immediate State action, having given up all hope of any adjustment in the Union. Indeed, we no longer have a Union, and the people are rapidly taking their position in favor of resumi
January 21st, 1861 AD (search for this): article 3
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.Processions for may. Anderson — Words of a South Carolina mother — the ladies. Charleston Jan. 21, 1861. The Good Book tells us, "if thine enemy hunger, feed him; if he thirst, give him drink" We are doing this. We are sending our prisoners fresh beef and vegetables, and, reports say, a little "Heidseick," too. But, for mercy's sake, don't let the abolitionists know this. Maj. Anderson, as you have heard, married a Georgia lady and has plantations there, and about two hundred negroes. Now that Georgia is out, Maj. Anderson may come out, too. If he don't, he may be forced out. Nothing from Col. Hayne has yet been made public. It may be that he does not press upon the President his ultimatum, for very good reasons; but, as I before stated, things will not remain as at present long. A gentleman has just informed me that all our batteries at the different points are now very near completion. They have now "Columbiad" an
January 21st, 1861 AD (search for this): article 5
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.Convention — Secession — Weather, &c. Williamsburg Jan. 21, 1861. A meeting was held here on last Saturday night, irrespective of party, in which resolutions favoring immediate secession were passed. Gen. John Tyler, T. B. Cosnabon, Esqand ColsJ. D. Munford and Robert T. Armistead entertained the meeting by soul-stirring addresses in favor of disunion and Southern rights. W. R. C. Douglas, Esq.delivered a very eloquent and conservative address, opposed to immediate secession. He thinks it requires time only to restore peace and tranquility to the country. A Convention will be held at Yorktown on to-day, (the 21st,) composed of delegates from this legislative district, in which they will nominate some one to represent the voice of the people in said district, in the Convention to be held at Richmond February 13th, 1861. The weather is remarkably cold. Farmers about here doing little or nothing upon their farms. O.
January 22nd, 1861 AD (search for this): article 1
From Washington.[special Correspondence of the Dispatch.] Washington, Washington.Jan, 22, 1861. Bleeding Kansas walked into the Abolition Union yesterday, and the Senators of three Southern States walked out. Two men of doubtful ability, and representing an idea at war with all justice, all honest Government, will replace ten men of the heroic mould and powerful mind of Toombs, Davis and Hammond. A precious Union for Virginia to cling, as and raise a blubbering "och hubbaboo" for peace. The Republicans won't give her at least decent pretext for so doing. The leave-taking of the seceding Senators was touching and solemn beyond description. It seemed to rouse the Abolitionists, for the first time, to a sense of the vast importance of setual and everlasting dissolution. Now they may possibly fling a meatless bone to the Border States. But, mark me, so long as there is even one slave State under the same Government with them, so long will they have the basis of an anti
January 23rd, 1861 AD (search for this): article 6
General Assembly of Virginia.[extra session.] Senate. Wednesday, Jan. 23d, 1861. The Senate was called to order at 12 o'clock. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Read, of the Presbyterian Church. A communication was received from the House announcing the passage of sundry bills, and requesting the concurrence of the Senate. Reports of Committees.--A bill to amend the charter of the Bank of Phillippi; a bill to amend the charter of the Bank of the Commonwealth; a bill amending anas laid over under the rules: Resolved, (the House of Delegates consenting,) That when the Senate adjourn on Monday next, it will be to the 18th of February, 1861 On motion, the Senate adjourned. House of delegates. Wednesday, Jan. 23d, 1861. The House was called to order at 12 o'clock M., by Speaker Crutchfield. Prayer by Rev. Mr. Willis, of the Baptist Church. A message from the Senate was read announcing the passage of sundry bills, some of which were taken
February 11th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 2
For Sale, from 90 to 100 Likely and Valuable Negroes: also, A Tract of Land at Louisa Court-House. By virtue of a decree of the Circuit Court of Louisa county, pronounced in the suits of Timberlake's distributees vs. Timberlake's executors and others, we shall proceed to sell st. Louisa Court-House, on Monday, the 11th day of February, 1861, commencing at 10 o'clock A. M., from 90 to 100 likely Negroes, the property of the estates of Henry, Elizabeth and Polly Timberlake, dec'd, late of Louisa county. The sale will be continued from day to day until completed. We will also sell on the same day, a tract of Land lying in the same county, not far from Thompson's Cross Roads, being the tract on which Miss Elizabeth Timberlake resided at the time of her death. Terms of Sale.--As to the Slaves: On a credit of 6 months, the purchaser giving bonds with good security, bearing interest from the day of sale, with liberty, however, to any purchaser to pay the whole or any part o
February 13th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 5
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.Convention — Secession — Weather, &c. Williamsburg Jan. 21, 1861. A meeting was held here on last Saturday night, irrespective of party, in which resolutions favoring immediate secession were passed. Gen. John Tyler, T. B. Cosnabon, Esqand ColsJ. D. Munford and Robert T. Armistead entertained the meeting by soul-stirring addresses in favor of disunion and Southern rights. W. R. C. Douglas, Esq.delivered a very eloquent and conservative address, opposed to immediate secession. He thinks it requires time only to restore peace and tranquility to the country. A Convention will be held at Yorktown on to-day, (the 21st,) composed of delegates from this legislative district, in which they will nominate some one to represent the voice of the people in said district, in the Convention to be held at Richmond February 13th, 1861. The weather is remarkably cold. Farmers about here doing little or nothing upon their farms. O.
February 18th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 6
r, That the said Engineer shall first submit his plans, with the cost of executing the same, to the Governor for his approval, and it such plans be approved by him the same shall be executed. The bill, as amended, was adopted unanimously. Adjournment Proposed.--Mr. Thomas, of Henry, proposed the following joint resolution, which was laid over under the rules: Resolved, (the House of Delegates consenting,) That when the Senate adjourn on Monday next, it will be to the 18th of February, 1861 On motion, the Senate adjourned. House of delegates. Wednesday, Jan. 23d, 1861. The House was called to order at 12 o'clock M., by Speaker Crutchfield. Prayer by Rev. Mr. Willis, of the Baptist Church. A message from the Senate was read announcing the passage of sundry bills, some of which were taken up, read the requisite number of times, and passed, among them acts amending and re- enacting the act entitled an act to incorporate the Jackson Orphan Asyl
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...