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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 30, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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Mary Eagle (search for this): article 7
s of the Ordinance were irritated by the presence of some twenty or thirty men who were known to be opposed to it, and who, it was thought, would cast their votes against it. Their party was small indeed, but Greenbrier men thought there ought to be no Union men in a county depending so much on Southern generosity and affluence for prosperity. The excitement and interest of the day were enhanced by the arrival of the Greenbrier Cavalry, Capt. Moorman. A beautiful flag, made by Miss Mary Eagle, was presented to the Company on behalf of herself and the ladies of Dry Creek, by Dr. Lake, whose appropriate and stirring address was responded to in an eloquent and happy manner by the Captain. During this ceremony it was reported that the little knot of Union men had raised a U. S. national flag near the polls, whereupon a number of the Cavalry and other citizens repaired to the spot and took possession of it and tore it into shreds, and sharing the pieces amongst themselves as
John R. Edmunds (search for this): article 20
stitution. Floyd. Has voted unanimously for the Ordinance of Secession. N. Thrash beats I. Goodykoontz about 80 votes. Fayette. For secession, 407; against it, 129, and three precincts to hear from. Botetourt, For the House of Delegates--Anderson, 781; James, 587; Word, 518; Waugh, 75. For the Senate — Boyd, 608; Wiley, 496. For Attorney for the Commonwealth — Miller, 809; Obenchain, 117. For secession, 1,260; against, 2. Halifax. George H. West and John R. Edmunds are elected to the House of Delegates by large majorities. Logan is elected to the Senate — all for secession. Prince Edward. For House of Delegates--T. T. Tredway, 403; R. A. Booker, 226; For secession, 688; against, none. For amendment, 385; against it, 214. All the precincts heard from, and this is the final result. Culpeper. For secession, 848; against it, none — tw precincts to hear from. Page. For Ordinance of Secession, 725; against, 0 Spitler, for S n
Ellsworth (search for this): article 1
worth to the President. It appears that Ellsworth was marching up the street with a squad of mouncing the sad news to the citizens. Col. Ellsworth's remains are deposited in the neat littleThe name of the secessionist that murdered Col. Ellsworth was James Jackson, keeper of the Marshall and then bayonetted him. The body of Col. Ellsworth was brought over in charge of six Zouaves. the reward of his devoted gallantry. Col. Ellsworth was twenty-four years of age, was unmarrient Colonel Farnham, who, by the death of Colonel Ellsworth is commander of the Firemen Zouaves, wasia Press went in mourning for the death of Col. Ellsworth. One would suppose from reading the Northet, at the assassination of the gallant young Ellsworth. One the face of every fireman is written, tice for the newspaper press. The body of Col. Ellsworth was opened and embalmed by Dr. Holmes, thet sorrow and indignation. The father of Colonel Ellsworth happened to be in the telegraph office w[18 more...]
Robert England (search for this): article 11
Arrests. --Captain Wilkinson arrested last night and caged a slave named Reuben, owned by Burwell Jones, for walking in the streets with an unlawful weapon. "The kind of weapon will be made known to-day before the Mayor.--Peter Allen, white, was caged for getting drunk, behaving disorderly, and assaulting Robert England in his own house.
J. J. English (search for this): article 4
Headq'rs Henrico liberty Guard, Springfield Ball, Church Hill, may 27th, 1861. Notice.--All the members of this command who have not resorted this ourselves for the r l form, will do so on Tuesday and Friday Evenings. It is very Important that every member should be present. N. B.--All who desire to unite themselves with this command, will report at their Armory or to any of the Sergeants. By order of Capt. J. J. English my 31--8t* C. Sherrer, O. S.
Jefferson Davis Every (search for this): article 15
An Omen; --The Giles volunteers, on their march to Lynchburg, Va., witnessed an incident, which, with one accord, they interpret into an augury of Southern victories and glorious success in our struggle for independence. A large hawk, sweeping down to the earth, caught a large black snake and soared up with his prey, writhing in agony and struggling for deliverance. Gradually the snake released his efforts, when the hawk, having cleared the tops of the surrounding hills struck a course due South. As soon as the incident was observed, the whole company agreed in calling the snake Lincoln, and the hawk Jeff. Davis Every man cheered the hawk, and when he made his triumphal flight, they made the mountain gorges fairly ring with their resounding shouts.
sworth, carried the identical secession flag which was torn down by the deceased. Then followed the President, accompanied by Secretaries Seward and Smith. The rear of the procession was composed of carriages containing the Captains of the Zouave Regiment. The train conveying the remains left the depot about 2 o'clock for the North. Capture of Captain Ball's Cavalry. The same correspondent thus speaks of the manner in which the capture of forty of Captain Ball's Cavalry, of Fairfax, was effected: One of the most unexpected features of this morning's military adventures into Virginia was the capture of a company of four officers and thirty-six men, composed of F. F. V.'s, of Fairfax county, Virginia, who had been enrolled into a brilliant and dashing Cavalry corps. This secession company were early alarmed by the arrival of the Government forces in Alexandria, and, mounting their horses, began a precipitate retreat, riding till they believed themselves far beyond
d was introduced, and held a conversation with Mrs. Lincoln upon the particulars of the sad event. It is not improbable that promotion will be the reward of his devoted gallantry. Col. Ellsworth was twenty-four years of age, was unmarried, and has parents living in the vicinity of Troy. An autopsy of Col. Ellsworth's body was made at six o'clock. It exhibited a wound of an inch in diameter directly through the heart, causing instant death. The remains are embalmed. Lieutenant Colonel Farnham, who, by the death of Colonel Ellsworth is commander of the Firemen Zouaves, was in the Mexican war, is an efficient officer, and it is believed will prove worthy to fill the place of his predecessor. The Philadelphia Press went in mourning for the death of Col. Ellsworth. One would suppose from reading the Northern journals that they never had the expectation that any of their men would be killed at the South.--Says the New York correspondent of the Press: It is impossib
Thomas Flaherty (search for this): article 16
Trifling charge. --Thos. Flaherty was carried before Recorder Caskie yesterday, for firing a pistol in the stable of Henry Lofker. Considering the times we live in, the act was deemed to have been committed with justifiable motives, and Flaherty was triumphantly acquitted. Trifling charge. --Thos. Flaherty was carried before Recorder Caskie yesterday, for firing a pistol in the stable of Henry Lofker. Considering the times we live in, the act was deemed to have been committed with justifiable motives, and Flaherty was triumphantly acquitted.
Christiansburg.--Official. For Secession, 1,395; against it, none. For the amendment, 1,391; against it, 2. Bath--Official. For Secession, 403; against it, 2. For amendment, 410; against it, 3. Board of Public Works--Holiaday, 315; Broun, 4--House of Delegates--Shields, 133; Hopkins, 156; Carpenter, 55. Fluvanna. For Secession, 877; against it, none. House of Delegates--R. E. Nelson, (no opposition,) 812. A large majority for the amendment to the Constitution. Floyd. Has voted unanimously for the Ordinance of Secession. N. Thrash beats I. Goodykoontz about 80 votes. Fayette. For secession, 407; against it, 129, and three precincts to hear from. Botetourt, For the House of Delegates--Anderson, 781; James, 587; Word, 518; Waugh, 75. For the Senate — Boyd, 608; Wiley, 496. For Attorney for the Commonwealth — Miller, 809; Obenchain, 117. For secession, 1,260; against, 2. Halifax. George H. West and John R. Edmunds are electe
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