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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: may 30, 1861., [Electronic resource].

Found 1,024 total hits in 480 results.

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forces from Rome are approaching a conclusion. The first steamer from Liverpool for New Orleans is advertised to sail on the 7th of August. The steamship Niagara, from Boston, via Halifax, arrived at Liverpool on the 13th instant. The steamship Columbia from New York, via St. Johns, N. F., arrived at Galway on the 14th The steamship Jura, from Quebec, arrived at Londonderry on the 14th. The steamship City of Washington, from New York, arrived at Queenstown on the 15th. orces from Rome are approaching a conclusion. The first steamer from Liverpool for New Orleans is advertised to sail on the 7th of August. The steamship Niagara, from Boston, via Halifax, arrived at Liverpool on the 13th instant. The steamship Columbia from New York, via St. Johns, N. F., arrived at Galway on the 14th The steamship Jura, from Quebec, arrived at Londonderry on the 14th. The steamship City of Washington, from New York, arrived at Queenstown on the 15th.
Picked up at sea. --The Galveston News announces the arrival of the schooner William, at that port, on the 18thinst., from Mobile, and says: The Captain reports that on the 14thinst. he picked up a small boat and a man, fifty miles from land. The man was in an exhausted condition. He stated that he had deserted from the Mobile Artillery, in company with two others, who had swam ashore, leaving him to drift to sea. When picked up he had been in the boat forty-eight hours, with nothing on but a pair of pants, having used his shirt for a sail. The boat is now in possession of Capt. Cooper, who will keep charge of it until it is claimed by the owner. It is a yawl, clinker built, about 20 feet long, such as are generally used by fishing smacks. The man was sent ashore yesterday, and is now in the city. He gave several different accounts as to how he came in possession of the boat.
Later from Europe.arrival of the Etna.American affairs, etc., etc. The steamship Esq., Capt. Kennedy, from Liverpool on Wednesday, the 15th inst., via Queenstown 16th, passed Cape Race 9:30 P. M. of Thursday, the 24th, and was boarded by the news yacht. The Etna has nearly £300,000 in specie. Her advices are four days later than those by the Persia. The steamship New York, from Bremen, left Southampton on the 15th for New York. She has £13,500 in specie. A proclamation has been issued by the British Government relative to affairs in the U. States, warning British subjects against engaging in the American war, and all doing so wilgara, from Boston, via Halifax, arrived at Liverpool on the 13th instant. The steamship Columbia from New York, via St. Johns, N. F., arrived at Galway on the 14th The steamship Jura, from Quebec, arrived at Londonderry on the 14th. The steamship City of Washington, from New York, arrived at Queenstown on the 15th.
Later from Europe.arrival of the Etna.American affairs, etc., etc. The steamship Esq., Capt. Kennedy, from Liverpool on Wednesday, the 15th inst., via Queenstown 16th, passed Cape Race 9:30 P. M. of Thursday, the 24th, and was boarded by the news yacht. The Etna has nearly £300,000 in specie. Her advices are four days later than those by the Persia. The steamship New York, from Bremen, left Southampton on the 15th for New York. She has £13,500 in specie. A proclamation has been issued by the British Government relative to affairs in the U. States, warning British subjects against engaging in the American war, and all doing so will be held responsible for their own acts.--The proclamation declares the intention of that Government in maintaining the strictest impartial neutrality between England and the Government of the United States, and certain States styling themselves the Confederate States of America. It warns all British subjects, if they enter the mil
to reduce the people of the State to subjection.--It is an attempt to keep up the Federation by military authority. It is a relinquishment of the idea of independent and equal States, and the substitution of the idea of holding by conquest. Do the Northern people dare to arrow such a purpose? Do they admit that in the spirit of the old Constitution, ten States might be held in the relation of provinces? Is this American? Is it the philosophy that has sprung out of the Revolution of 1776, the Constitution of 1788, and our subsequent history? Do any two European nations hate each other better than the two sections of this late Union do at this present moment? Did England and France ever hate as Virginia and New York do just now and will continue to do (certainly if we are held by force?) Do Austria and Venetia hate any better? The retention of unwilling and hostile States may prove as injurious to the Northern section as to that which is subdued. It changes at once, as
Excellence the Governor of the State, and advisory Council to the command for the present, of such volunteers from Maryland as may be offer their services, the undersigned advises immediate organization into companies of not less than any men, who will elect their own officers. The certificates of election will be returned to the commending officer who will forthwith procure the proper commissions. Each company will consist of one Captain, one First and one Second Lieutenant four Sergeants, four Corporate, and forty-two privates. It is earnestly recommended to the Maryland men that they lose no time in perfecting their organization. Inheriting as we do the name of the old "Maryland Line," let us imitate their Virtues, and let the Maryland Line of to-day as did the grand "Old Maryland Continentals," of 1776, set an example of loyally discipline and courage to be emulated but not surpassed by our brothers of the South. Francis J. Thomas, my 25--ts Col. Commanding.
e State to subjection.--It is an attempt to keep up the Federation by military authority. It is a relinquishment of the idea of independent and equal States, and the substitution of the idea of holding by conquest. Do the Northern people dare to arrow such a purpose? Do they admit that in the spirit of the old Constitution, ten States might be held in the relation of provinces? Is this American? Is it the philosophy that has sprung out of the Revolution of 1776, the Constitution of 1788, and our subsequent history? Do any two European nations hate each other better than the two sections of this late Union do at this present moment? Did England and France ever hate as Virginia and New York do just now and will continue to do (certainly if we are held by force?) Do Austria and Venetia hate any better? The retention of unwilling and hostile States may prove as injurious to the Northern section as to that which is subdued. It changes at once, as we have said, the whole c
ly organized as Cavalry. Infantry and Artillery, have offered their services to President Davis, in addition to her quota of men to be furnished in compliance with his requisition. The distillery of Messrs. Harrel & Arter, at Cairo, has been torn down to give room for a portion of the fortifications the Federal forces are erecting. The cotton mills at Webster, Mass. have been stopped. Large numbers of persons have thus been thrown out of employment. The editors of the Raleigh Register have been elected Printers to the Convention of North Carolina. An extensive powder mill has been established on the banks of the St. Catharine, a few miles above Natchez. Wheat was cut in LaGrange, Ga., on the 18th inst. Ex-Governor Morchead, of Kentucky, is now an ultra Southern Right man. The Charleston "Mercury" says the rice crop is everywhere fine, so far as heard from. Twenty seven persons have died of the injuries received in the collision in St. Louis.
Picked up at sea. --The Galveston News announces the arrival of the schooner William, at that port, on the 18thinst., from Mobile, and says: The Captain reports that on the 14thinst. he picked up a small boat and a man, fifty miles from land. The man was in an exhausted condition. He stated that he had deserted from the Mobile Artillery, in company with two others, who had swam ashore, leaving him to drift to sea. When picked up he had been in the boat forty-eight hours, with nothing on but a pair of pants, having used his shirt for a sail. The boat is now in possession of Capt. Cooper, who will keep charge of it until it is claimed by the owner. It is a yawl, clinker built, about 20 feet long, such as are generally used by fishing smacks. The man was sent ashore yesterday, and is now in the city. He gave several different accounts as to how he came in possession of the boat.
October, 1851 AD (search for this): article 2
ive prerogative by Gov. Letcher. The following prisoners were released on yesterday: Alonzo C. Turner, sent by Lynchburg Circuit Court in 1857, for 18 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Bartholomew Maloney, sent in 1852 by the Circuit Court of Augusta county for 40 years, as principal and aider and abettor in the commission of a rape. He was convicted in 10 cases, 4 years each; Frank Green, free negro, sent for 5 years by Middlesex County Court, for larceny. His time would have been out to-day. Nathaniel M. Dudley, sent by the Circuit Court of McDowell, for one year, for forgery; James Halcombe, sent by Greenbrier Circuit Court in 1858, for 5 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Uriah Cherry, sent by Norfolk Circuit Court, in Oct., 1851, for 18 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Henry D. Croft, sent by the Floyd Co. Circuit Court in 1861, for 3 years, for voluntary manslaughter; Wm. J. Merrill, sent by Albemarle Circuit Court, in May, 1860, for 3 years, for manslaughter.
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