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t more so, if he had let out a few more than he did. Unless the Penitentiary buildings are enlarged at no distant day, (of which at present there seems not to be the slightest chance) the requirements of the occasion will be such as to demand a full and free use of the Executive prerogative by Gov. Letcher. The following prisoners were released on yesterday: Alonzo C. Turner, sent by Lynchburg Circuit Court in 1857, for 18 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Bartholomew Maloney, sent in 1852 by the Circuit Court of Augusta county for 40 years, as principal and aider and abettor in the commission of a rape. He was convicted in 10 cases, 4 years each; Frank Green, free negro, sent for 5 years by Middlesex County Court, for larceny. His time would have been out to-day. Nathaniel M. Dudley, sent by the Circuit Court of McDowell, for one year, for forgery; James Halcombe, sent by Greenbrier Circuit Court in 1858, for 5 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Uriah Cherry, sent by Norf
Executive. We thought he did right, and would have been equally right, if not more so, if he had let out a few more than he did. Unless the Penitentiary buildings are enlarged at no distant day, (of which at present there seems not to be the slightest chance) the requirements of the occasion will be such as to demand a full and free use of the Executive prerogative by Gov. Letcher. The following prisoners were released on yesterday: Alonzo C. Turner, sent by Lynchburg Circuit Court in 1857, for 18 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Bartholomew Maloney, sent in 1852 by the Circuit Court of Augusta county for 40 years, as principal and aider and abettor in the commission of a rape. He was convicted in 10 cases, 4 years each; Frank Green, free negro, sent for 5 years by Middlesex County Court, for larceny. His time would have been out to-day. Nathaniel M. Dudley, sent by the Circuit Court of McDowell, for one year, for forgery; James Halcombe, sent by Greenbrier Circuit Court
ive prerogative by Gov. Letcher. The following prisoners were released on yesterday: Alonzo C. Turner, sent by Lynchburg Circuit Court in 1857, for 18 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Bartholomew Maloney, sent in 1852 by the Circuit Court of Augusta county for 40 years, as principal and aider and abettor in the commission of a rape. He was convicted in 10 cases, 4 years each; Frank Green, free negro, sent for 5 years by Middlesex County Court, for larceny. His time would have been out to-day. Nathaniel M. Dudley, sent by the Circuit Court of McDowell, for one year, for forgery; James Halcombe, sent by Greenbrier Circuit Court in 1858, for 5 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Uriah Cherry, sent by Norfolk Circuit Court, in Oct., 1851, for 18 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Henry D. Croft, sent by the Floyd Co. Circuit Court in 1861, for 3 years, for voluntary manslaughter; Wm. J. Merrill, sent by Albemarle Circuit Court, in May, 1860, for 3 years, for manslaughter.
October 18th, 1859 AD (search for this): article 1
is pleasant to be able to say that I have no war news to send you. Our good old town is as serene to day as the blue May sky that bends above her. All apprehension of an early attack from the Yankees has disappeared. The passage of companies, battalions, and regiments through our streets has ceased. The only military spectacle that enlivens them is furnished by an occasional squad of Continentals--Company K, 4th Regiment, noted for their constant attendance upon John Brown, from the 18th of October, 1859, to the end of his valuable life, and now commanded by Capt. Avis, the jailor of that worthy,--on their way to mount guard over the Hospital, or the thirty-two pounders sent up from Richmond. A large number of these guns are still here, enough having been sent down, it is thought, for all necessary purposes. The Hospital was opened here ten days ago, most of its few inmates having been sent up from Harper's Ferry, and the rest contributed by the Mississippians, who suffered from t
May, 1860 AD (search for this): article 2
tive prerogative by Gov. Letcher. The following prisoners were released on yesterday: Alonzo C. Turner, sent by Lynchburg Circuit Court in 1857, for 18 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Bartholomew Maloney, sent in 1852 by the Circuit Court of Augusta county for 40 years, as principal and aider and abettor in the commission of a rape. He was convicted in 10 cases, 4 years each; Frank Green, free negro, sent for 5 years by Middlesex County Court, for larceny. His time would have been out to-day. Nathaniel M. Dudley, sent by the Circuit Court of McDowell, for one year, for forgery; James Halcombe, sent by Greenbrier Circuit Court in 1858, for 5 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Uriah Cherry, sent by Norfolk Circuit Court, in Oct., 1851, for 18 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Henry D. Croft, sent by the Floyd Co. Circuit Court in 1861, for 3 years, for voluntary manslaughter; Wm. J. Merrill, sent by Albemarle Circuit Court, in May, 1860, for 3 years, for manslaughter.
ive prerogative by Gov. Letcher. The following prisoners were released on yesterday: Alonzo C. Turner, sent by Lynchburg Circuit Court in 1857, for 18 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Bartholomew Maloney, sent in 1852 by the Circuit Court of Augusta county for 40 years, as principal and aider and abettor in the commission of a rape. He was convicted in 10 cases, 4 years each; Frank Green, free negro, sent for 5 years by Middlesex County Court, for larceny. His time would have been out to-day. Nathaniel M. Dudley, sent by the Circuit Court of McDowell, for one year, for forgery; James Halcombe, sent by Greenbrier Circuit Court in 1858, for 5 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Uriah Cherry, sent by Norfolk Circuit Court, in Oct., 1851, for 18 years, for murder in the 2nd degree; Henry D. Croft, sent by the Floyd Co. Circuit Court in 1861, for 3 years, for voluntary manslaughter; Wm. J. Merrill, sent by Albemarle Circuit Court, in May, 1860, for 3 years, for manslaughter.
May 8th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 8
Quartermaster's office, Army of the Confed, States, Richmond, Va.may 8th, 1861. Notice.--All persons are hereby notified that no contracts for Quartermaster supplies for the army of the Confederate States in this city will be paid, unless the purchase has been authorized by a written order from the undersigned. W. L. Cabell, Maj. and Q. M. my 8--1m C. S. A.
May 20th, 1861 AD (search for this): article 6
Camp Ashland, may 20th, 1861. Cavalry Notice.--The old members of the Henrico light Dragoons having arms belonging in the State, or any property belonging to the Company, who are not enlisted and mustered into the service of the State, will return them immediately to Mr. A. B. Hutcheson. Franklin street, Richmond. Should they still desire to join the Company, they can report to me at Camp Ashland. Twenty new members, uniformed and well mounted (if application is made in ten days) will be received. Z. S. McGRUDER, my 22--10t Captain R. L. D.
May 22nd, 1861 AD (search for this): article 4
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatchthe cause of the South in Kentucky. Hopkinsville, Ky. May 22, 1861. The people of Kentucky have been blinded by the adhesion to the Administration of the Louisville Democrat and Journal. The Courier espouses boldly the cause of the South. The two Ohio river organs (Democrat and Journal,) have created such a division in our State that we can do nothing at present. We expect our Legislature to arm us soon. The people, through the Legislature, have decided upon an armed neutrality, and Gov. Magoffin executes their views in a proclamation, that the belligerents must bold our soil as sacred. We have been almost upon the verge of civil war here. Lincoln has been putting arms into the hands of his abolition agents here. The Union party--many of them true friends of the South--are prejudiced against the secession movement. They say they can best serve the South by a neutral position, and I hope now our people will be united in this posit
May 22nd, 1861 AD (search for this): article 7
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.the Dispatch — the crops, &c. Crawfordville, Lowndes Co., Miss., May 22d, 1861. As all eyes are turned to Virginia, as being the seat of war, I enclose you the subscription for your valuable daily paper, in order that I may be in receipt of the latest news transpiring. I will say one word about our crops. Wheat is the best we have had for years, and we are now harvesting. Oats are also very fine.--Corn looks very well, and there has been a great deal more planted than usual. We have a good stand of cotton, and that is doing very well. The Cotton States want to make about four millions of bales, to help pay the war expenses, which we will do with a good will. Success to our cause. A. C. H.
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