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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 785 total hits in 382 results.

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February, 4 AD (search for this): article 6
Cotton planting --A correspondent of the Savannah Republican, writing from Washington, Ga., April 2d, says: "Our planters had a meeting yesterday, which was largely attended, and they unanimously resolved and pledged themselves not to plant any cotton for sales the present year.--They will raise just enough for their own domestic consumption, and plant all their lands in grain. Our people are determined to support the army, and help to whip the fight in every way." A letter dated Talbotton, Ga., says: "We had a glorious meeting here yesterday on cotton planting. Several of our largest planters will not plant a seed, among them, Major J. H. Walton, who has been in the habit of planting 600 acres in cotton.--So, also, old Mr. Searcy, and his son, Dr. Searcy, and Mr. J. Canker. I do not believe there will be 300 acres of cotton planted in the county. We have a cavalry company in progress, for the equipment of which $1,000 have been subscribed." The Sande
March, 4 AD (search for this): article 18
From the North. Our Northern dates are as late as Thursday, April 3. The news is by no means important, and we therefore make very brief selections: From General Banks column. Woodstock, Va., April 2. --Afternoon.--The rebels, when retreating yesterday, attempted to burn a bridge over the creek near Narrow Passage, but it was extinguished. The magnificent railroad bridge, a hundred feet high, over the same stream, was burnt by Jackson when retreating from General Shields. A beautiful gray stallion, said by contrabands to be Colonel Ashby's, was shot yesterday near this town. The ball must have wounded the rider in the thigh. The current report, however, that Ashby was wounded, is not credited at headquarters. Some of Ashby's scouts made their appearance early this morning on the high, wooded ridge on the opposite side of the Stony creek, beyond Edinburg. They were fired on by some of the 29th Pennsylvania, when Ashby unmasked four guns and threw shel
March, 4 AD (search for this): article 3
lty; L P Maines, Baltimore, --; M P Morse, Matthews co, Va, disloyalty. Committed 31st March.--Michael Gately, desertion; S Z Howard, 14th Ala., desertion; Thos Johnson, desertion; W C Hughes, --; Thos Leonard, 14th Ala., assault and battery; Patrick Murphy, Magruder's Artillery,--. Committed 1st April.--J S Brantwhite, Richmond, Union man; George White, Baltimore, desertion; John Hughes, Cropper's corps, desertion. Committed 2d April.--Samuel McGoe Alias Dockerty, Livinston dragoons, --; John S O' Brien, Richmond, desertion; Tim, O Brien, desertion; Mike Murphy, --; W Fitzgerald, desertion, after engaging as a substitute; Wm Ryan, 19th Miss., do. Committed 3d April.--John Smith,--; Tim Webster, Mrs Webster, Kentucky, spies; Nicholas Luise, --; Mike Cuppy, Appomattox, --; John Fallon, guard, breach of discipline; Wm Miller, do., do; Mike Ambrain, political prisoner; Mike Fitzgerald, New Orleans, fighting; David Pettus, 38th Vat regiment, --; J T Reed, disloyalty.
September, 4 AD (search for this): article 1
Latest from Corinth.the position of our army. gallant Attnock of Morgan's Cavalry six thousand prisoners in our hands. &c. &c. &c. [Special Dispatch to the Richmond Dispatch.] Corinth, April 9. --We still hold the battlefield. It is not thought the enemy will advance. The weather is bad and the roads impassable. We possess all the captured property. Morgan's cavalry yesterday (Tuesday) morning attacked a considerable force of the enemy in one of their camps and killed a large number of them, besides burning the tents our army were unable to bring away with them. The wounded are pouring in. Our loss is probably three thousand. The most of the wounded were shot in the limbs. Generals Gladden, Bushrod Johnson, and Hindman are wounded. Colonel Blythe, of Mississippi, and Capt. Hampton, of Alexandria, were killed. Lieutenant Storum, of the Washington Artillery, was shot through the body. The fight of Monday was less decisive than that of Sunday. The fir
September, 4 AD (search for this): article 2
Yankees killed and captured in North Carolina. Wilmington, N. C., April 9 --Our pickets captured nine Yankees and killed three on Monday last, within six miles of Shepardsville, Carteret county. Three have been brought in, three will arrive in a few hours, and three have been carried to Kinston. Captain Booth's horse was killed under him.
November, 4 AD (search for this): article 21
o the country that Andrew Jackson was not in the Presidential chair in place of James Buchanan, who sat still, and allowed the traitors to go on consummated their unholy schemes.) What did South Carolina next do? Attacked Fort Moultrie and Castle Pinckney, drove the gallant Anderson into Fort Sumter, and thus, under the direction of Beauregard, who is some time styled No regard, commenced erecting the long line of batteries and forts. Beauregard continued erecting his forts, until on the 11th of April, he had a conference with the gallant Anderson, who told him that he would be out of provisions on the 15th, and would then, unless relief was sent, be compelled to surrender. Pryor, of Virginia (that then loyal State,) was in Charleston the time, and maintained that a blow must be struck, or Virginia would be lost. An unarmed vessel, laden with provisions, was sent to the relief of Fort Sumter, but was fired upon by the rebels, and turned back. On the 12th, Beauregard followed t
January, 5 AD (search for this): article 21
12th, Beauregard followed the advice of Pryor, in order to help Virginia side of the Union. I need not tell you of the many long and weary hours of suffering endured within the walls of Fort Sumter by the brave and patriotic Anderson, and his band of faithful soldiers — you have all, doubtless, read of them. Here, for the first time the nation's history, was the national flag of the United States disgraced. Soon after the fall of Sumter, Secretary Walker publicly boasted that on the 1st of May the Confederate flag should float on the Capitol at Washington, and preparation was made by the Provisional Government of the Confederate States to raise an army of 105,600 men. All this was done before the proclamation of President Lincoln appeared. Davis commenced the war, and you was called upon to assist the Southern Confederacy, to join in taking back Washington which already belongs to you. You all called upon to join a band of robbers and abolitionists, to get back what alre
James Abel (search for this): article 3
$50 and ten dollars reward for a Runaway, --Ten dollars reward will be paid for the delivery to jail, or to me, of a mulatto Girl, named Emma. Said Girl is about 5 feet 2 inches high, and rather spare-build, small face, and tolerably straight hair. I will also give $50 to any one who can give good proof who has been harboring her Stewards of hospitals are particularly requested to look out for her, and to inform me if caught, as the Girl falsely pretends to be a free woman. James Abel, ap 8--6t 17th st., opposite Fish Market.
S. H. Adams (search for this): article 17
A half-brother of Gen. Zellicoffer, one of the Confederate prisoners confined at Terre Haute, Indiana, died on the 23d ult. The total number of deaths to that date was seven--names not given. Rev. S. H. Adams, of Yorkville, S. C., a faithful minister and devoted patriot, died recently.
Mike Ambrain (search for this): article 3
alty; L P Maines, Baltimore, --; M P Morse, Matthews co, Va, disloyalty. Committed 31st March.--Michael Gately, desertion; S Z Howard, 14th Ala., desertion; Thos Johnson, desertion; W C Hughes, --; Thos Leonard, 14th Ala., assault and battery; Patrick Murphy, Magruder's Artillery,--. Committed 1st April.--J S Brantwhite, Richmond, Union man; George White, Baltimore, desertion; John Hughes, Cropper's corps, desertion. Committed 2d April.--Samuel McGoe Alias Dockerty, Livinston dragoons, --; John S O' Brien, Richmond, desertion; Tim, O Brien, desertion; Mike Murphy, --; W Fitzgerald, desertion, after engaging as a substitute; Wm Ryan, 19th Miss., do. Committed 3d April.--John Smith,--; Tim Webster, Mrs Webster, Kentucky, spies; Nicholas Luise, --; Mike Cuppy, Appomattox, --; John Fallon, guard, breach of discipline; Wm Miller, do., do; Mike Ambrain, political prisoner; Mike Fitzgerald, New Orleans, fighting; David Pettus, 38th Vat regiment, --; J T Reed, disloyalty.
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