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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 10, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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a (that then loyal State,) was in Charleston the time, and maintained that a blow must be struck, or Virginia would be lost. An unarmed vessel, laden with provisions, was sent to the relief of Fort Sumter, but was fired upon by the rebels, and turned back. On the 12th, Beauregard followed the advice of Pryor, in order to help Virginia side of the Union. I need not tell you of the many long and weary hours of suffering endured within the walls of Fort Sumter by the brave and patriotic Anderson, and his band of faithful soldiers — you have all, doubtless, read of them. Here, for the first time the nation's history, was the national flag of the United States disgraced. Soon after the fall of Sumter, Secretary Walker publicly boasted that on the 1st of May the Confederate flag should float on the Capitol at Washington, and preparation was made by the Provisional Government of the Confederate States to raise an army of 105,600 men. All this was done before the proclamation of
y's scouts made their appearance early this morning on the high, wooded ridge on the opposite side of the Stony creek, beyond Edinburg. They were fired on by some of the 29th Pennsylvania, when Ashby unmasked four guns and threw shells into our camp. The rebels subsequently retreated under the fire of our guns. During the day they frequently interfered with our bridge builders by shelling them at long range. A foot bridge has, however, been completed, and our skirmishers and some of Andrews's Sharpshooters are now on the other side beyond the town. Second Lieutenant Duff and two privates of Ashby's cavalry were captured yesterday. Lieut Duff admitted that he was carrying dispatches, but refused to divulge their contents or who they were from. An intercepted letter, of recent date, from a rebel line officer, speaks significantly of an anticipated open rebellion in Maryland; but this is regarded as one of the means resorted to by the Secession leaders to dupe their fo
elds. A beautiful gray stallion, said by contrabands to be Colonel Ashby's, was shot yesterday near this town. The ball must have wounded the rider in the thigh. The current report, however, that Ashby was wounded, is not credited at headquarters. Some of Ashby's scoutsAshby's scouts made their appearance early this morning on the high, wooded ridge on the opposite side of the Stony creek, beyond Edinburg. They were fired on by some of the 29th Pennsylvania, when Ashby unmasked four guns and threw shells into our camp. The rebels subsequently retreated underde beyond the town. Second Lieutenant Duff and two privates of Ashby's cavalry were captured yesterday. Lieut Duff admitted that he was one locomotive at this end of the Manassas road, and no cars. Ashby's cavalry were reinforced to-day by two or more heavy guns, with whf yesterday shows the accuracy of our cannoneers. In a field where Ashby made a stand were counted shell within a space of one hundred and f
"Wake up the wrong Passenger." --This homely, but often exceedingly apposite proverb, was humorously illustrated yesterday. It seems that the day before a negro stumbled unconsciously in the Provost Marshal's office with an order from the Exchange Hotel for a bottle of champagne, bearing a capable carpet-bag in which the sparkling Heidrick was to be carried to the expectant disciple of the rosy god, Bacchus. Both the order and the carpet-bag were intended for a restaurant on Franklin street, not far from the Marshal's office. The consequence was, that the negro, order and carpet-bag were taken possession of by the Marshal. He took up his residence, mush against his will, in Castle Godwin, and yesterday three barrels of whiskey and a tierce of wine were seized and sent to the general reception room of the Provost Marshal.
nctionary to day to answer the charge of having dangerously wounded Private George Balley, of the Davis Light Dragoons, by striking him on the side of the head with a brickbat. The injury turned out to be more serious than was at first imagined, Bailey, who was taken to the Medical College Hospital, dying yesterday from the effects of the blow. Coroner Sanxay held an inquest over the remains soon after being notified of the death of the party. The evidence before the jury was only as to to the Medical College Hospital, dying yesterday from the effects of the blow. Coroner Sanxay held an inquest over the remains soon after being notified of the death of the party. The evidence before the jury was only as to the result of the blow given Bailey, which medical testimony established had fractured his skull and produced death. The verdict of the jury was in accordance with this fact. Other testimony may be introduced on the examination of the accused before the Mayor to day.
Y Phillips, Richmond, disloyalty. Committed 21st March.--J. C. Humphreys, R F Humphreys, J P Pritchard, Frank Livingston, Richmond, disloyalty. Committed 22d March.--Thomas Hancock, Richmond, suspicion. Committed 24th March.--Samuel Zeigler, alias Greenwall, Harper's Ferry, suspicion; D S Cates, 4th Tennessee regiment. Committed 25th March.--Wm L Schofield, Texas, Thos Robertson, Ga, spies. Committed 26th March.--W W Ritch, Washington, N C, supposed to be a spy; E S Baker, Richmond,--; Alex Morris, Gordonsville, disloyalty; Chas Brown, New Orleans,--; Price Lewis, New York, spy. Committed 27th March.--Wm B West, 13th Va Vols,--; Richard Pierce, Richmond Zouaves, Felix Hughes, Johnson's artillery, suspicion. Committed 28th March.--Christopher Bolton, Henrico, disloyalty; L P Maines, Baltimore, --; M P Morse, Matthews co, Va, disloyalty. Committed 31st March.--Michael Gately, desertion; S Z Howard, 14th Ala., desertion; Thos Johnson, desertion; W
R. F. Baldwin (search for this): article 16
presentatives. Wednesday, April 9, 1862. The House met at 12 o'clock, and was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Pettigrew. Journal of yesterday read. The chair announced the following committee appointments to supply vacancies:--Mr. Baldwin, of Va., on Committee of Ways and Means, in place of Mr. Garnett. Mr. Garnett, on the Military Committee, in place of Mr. Peyor, resigned. Mr. Jones, of Tenn., moved to suspend the rule for calling the States, to go through with the commived that the memorial be referred to the Committee on the Judiciary, with instructions to report a bill providing payment for these and all similar claims, when properly authenticated. On this motion a debate arose in which Messrs. Boteler, Baldwin, Smith of Va., Garnett, Conrad of La., and others participated. The motion of Mr. Boteler was not agreed to. Mr. Smith, of Va., moved a reconsideration of the vote by which the motion of Mr. Boteler was lost, and after discussing the
R. F. Baldwin (search for this): article 8
The flag of truce steamer from Fortress Monroe, on the 7th instant, brought to Norfolk Col. R. F. Baldwin, of Winchester; Maj. W. N. Brown, 20th Mississippi regiment, and Maj. R. McAlexander, of Ala.
George Balley (search for this): article 1
Died from his Injuries. --We made mention yesterday of the fact that William D. Bowman had been brought before the Mayor on the previous day and held to bail to appear before, that functionary to day to answer the charge of having dangerously wounded Private George Balley, of the Davis Light Dragoons, by striking him on the side of the head with a brickbat. The injury turned out to be more serious than was at first imagined, Bailey, who was taken to the Medical College Hospital, dying yesterday from the effects of the blow. Coroner Sanxay held an inquest over the remains soon after being notified of the death of the party. The evidence before the jury was only as to the result of the blow given Bailey, which medical testimony established had fractured his skull and produced death. The verdict of the jury was in accordance with this fact. Other testimony may be introduced on the examination of the accused before the Mayor to day.
From the North. Our Northern dates are as late as Thursday, April 3. The news is by no means important, and we therefore make very brief selections: From General Banks column. Woodstock, Va., April 2. --Afternoon.--The rebels, when retreating yesterday, attempted to burn a bridge over the creek near Narrow Passage, but it was extinguished. The magnificent railroad bridge, a hundred feet high, over the same stream, was burnt by Jackson when retreating from General Shields.ty feet, fired at a mile and a half range. The valley of Shenandoah shows great neglect of agriculture. The men, women and children, who seem to have unlimited confidence in the Yankee troops, hold unrestricted intercourse with them. Gen. Banks is here and Gen. Shields at Strasburg. A division post-office has been established here, but the mails are irregular at present. Winchester, April 2.--Fourteen rebel victims of Sunday's battle were seen to-day at a house near Newtown.
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