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of foreigners who can not speak English. It is indeed fortunate if the Administration has got rid of this office-seeking Abolitionist. It is fortunate for the country; for his ignorance of military operations would certainly have brought further and greater disasters upon the army of that department. Let him be commander- in-chief of the Abolitionists, with "no subordinate," since he has resigned his military commission for being placed in a subordinate position. He is fit only for Garrison's army of destructive, who desire to live under an "unwritten Constitution, " so that they may, to use the beautiful and impressive language of our esteemed neighbor of the Courant, "loose the bonds of every slave upon this continent, and make the whole Southern region a live hell for one generation at least. " News from Fredericksburg — Departure of Gen. King for the Shenandoah Valley. Fredericksburg, Va., June 28. --Gen. King and staff left Fredericksburg to day for the Valle
J. M. Gillis (search for this): article 8
ith two iron plates; in fact, my upper works are completely riddled. One shot struck the steam valve, bending it, which slowed us down — fortunately not stopping the engine. As you ordered me to return after delivering the dispatches, I passed the batteries again at night, but was not fired at. Ten shots struck the vessel in all, to say nothing of the bullets in the wood work from the sharpshooters. Very respectfully, your ob't serv't. E. P. McCrea, Lieutenant Commanding. Commander J. M. Gillis, commanding naval forces, James river. The great battle before Richmond,[from the N. Y. World, June 30.] A battle, which resulted, as we are informed by a trustworthy authority, in the grandest Union triumph of the war, and which would probably insure the capture of Richmond, took place at the close of last week, but the particulars we are not permitted to publish, Secretary Stanton having taken upon himself to prohibit the sending of all dispatches from Washington giving
J. A. Gurley (search for this): article 8
fested. It is stated that the tone of the last dispatches received at the State Department is not altogether satisfactory, but that nothing is said from which it could be at all inferred that the European Powers designed taking any immediate steps toward mediation.--The defeat of the Militia bill in the Canadian Parliament has not improved John Bull's temper, and he will seize upon the reverse at Charleston with as much avidity as he did upon that in Banks department. On this subject Hon. J. A. Gurley has received a letter from a highly intelligent adopted citizen of Ohio, who has been in England for the past six months, spending much time in the cotton district. He says: Firstly — I have the best reasons for knowing that intervention in our affairs was determined upon by England and France some months ago, and for the reasons, amongst others, I gave you in my letter of March last. Secondly — This determination would have been acted upon before this had not the contest b
ments serenaded the General, and this morning his headquarters was thronged with officers come to say "good-bye." Gen. Pope is daily expected to arrive, though it is not yet known at what point his headquarters will be established. Imprisonment of clergymen in Nashville. Nashville, June 28. --At the special second conference of clergymen before Governor Johnson all declined to take the oath of allegiance, Most of them were sent to the Penitentiary, prior to their removal to General Halleck, for the purpose of being exchanged for Tennessee prisoners. Many Nashville churches will be without pastors to-morrow. Among those sent to durance were the Rev Drs. Baldwin, Schouc, and Sawvle, Methodists, and Ford and Howell, Baptists. The Rev. Dr. Wharton was allowed some days' grace on account of illness. The Rev. Mr. Killett did not appear. The Rev. Mr. Hendricks is expected to take the oath. Catholic livings, being loyal, were not disturbed. Affairs at Alexandria. Ale
lled and wounded proves. Brigadier-General Hooker. Brigadier-General Joseph Hooker commands a division of the army of the Potomac, and has distinguished himself exceedingly at the battle of Fair Oaks and the other conflicts of the campaign in Virginia. He was born in Massachusetts, about the year 1817, and is consequently about 45 years of age. --He entered West Point in 1833, and graduated in the artillery in 1837. At the outbreak of the war with Mexico he accompanied Brigadier-General Hamer as aide-de-camp, and was brevetted Captain for gallant conduct in several conflicts at Monterey, in March, 1847, he was appointed Assistant Adjutant General, with the rank of Captain. At the National Bridge he distinguished himself, and was brevetted Major; and at Chapellepec, he again attracted attention by his gallant and meritorious conduct, and was brevetted Lieutenant-Colonel. At the close of the war with Mexico he withdrew from the service, and soon afterward emigrated t
Heintzelman (search for this): article 8
t Contreras and Churubusco be distinguished himself, and received the braver of Major. At the assault on Chapuitepec he led the storming party, and was severely wounded. For this he received the brevet of Lieutenant Colonel. At the outbreak of the rebellion Colonel Casey was one of the first to offer his services to the Government, and obtained command of a brigade in August, 1861. On the reorganization of the army under Gen. McClellan he was appointed to the command of a division in Gen. Heintzelman's corps. General McClellan's first dispatch, written hastily on the field of battle, did some injustice to General Casey, which has since been repaired by an explanatory dispatch. General Casey's division, though weak, and much reddened by sickness, stood its ground splendidly, as its long record of killed and wounded proves. Brigadier-General Hooker. Brigadier-General Joseph Hooker commands a division of the army of the Potomac, and has distinguished himself exceedingly a
Hendricks (search for this): article 8
nson all declined to take the oath of allegiance, Most of them were sent to the Penitentiary, prior to their removal to General Halleck, for the purpose of being exchanged for Tennessee prisoners. Many Nashville churches will be without pastors to-morrow. Among those sent to durance were the Rev Drs. Baldwin, Schouc, and Sawvle, Methodists, and Ford and Howell, Baptists. The Rev. Dr. Wharton was allowed some days' grace on account of illness. The Rev. Mr. Killett did not appear. The Rev. Mr. Hendricks is expected to take the oath. Catholic livings, being loyal, were not disturbed. Affairs at Alexandria. Alexandria, June 30. --Capt. McMillan, of company E, 4th Ohio, fell overboard yesterday, and before assistance could be extended to him he was drowned. The hospitals in this city are full of sick and wounded soldiers, numbering altogether some 1,800. The buildings are kept clear and well ventilated, and the patients receive the best care and attention. Yesterday de
Joseph Hooker (search for this): article 8
justice to General Casey, which has since been repaired by an explanatory dispatch. General Casey's division, though weak, and much reddened by sickness, stood its ground splendidly, as its long record of killed and wounded proves. Brigadier-General Hooker. Brigadier-General Joseph Hooker commands a division of the army of the Potomac, and has distinguished himself exceedingly at the battle of Fair Oaks and the other conflicts of the campaign in Virginia. He was born in MassachusetBrigadier-General Joseph Hooker commands a division of the army of the Potomac, and has distinguished himself exceedingly at the battle of Fair Oaks and the other conflicts of the campaign in Virginia. He was born in Massachusetts, about the year 1817, and is consequently about 45 years of age. --He entered West Point in 1833, and graduated in the artillery in 1837. At the outbreak of the war with Mexico he accompanied Brigadier-General Hamer as aide-de-camp, and was brevetted Captain for gallant conduct in several conflicts at Monterey, in March, 1847, he was appointed Assistant Adjutant General, with the rank of Captain. At the National Bridge he distinguished himself, and was brevetted Major; and at Chapellepec,
Imprisonment of clergymen in Nashville. Nashville, June 28. --At the special second conference of clergymen before Governor Johnson all declined to take the oath of allegiance, Most of them were sent to the Penitentiary, prior to their removal to General Halleck, for the purpose of being exchanged for Tennessee prisoners. Many Nashville churches will be without pastors to-morrow. Among those sent to durance were the Rev Drs. Baldwin, Schouc, and Sawvle, Methodists, and Ford and Howell, Baptists. The Rev. Dr. Wharton was allowed some days' grace on account of illness. The Rev. Mr. Killett did not appear. The Rev. Mr. Hendricks is expected to take the oath. Catholic livings, being loyal, were not disturbed. Affairs at Alexandria. Alexandria, June 30. --Capt. McMillan, of company E, 4th Ohio, fell overboard yesterday, and before assistance could be extended to him he was drowned. The hospitals in this city are full of sick and wounded soldiers, numbering al
Stonewall Jackson (search for this): article 8
y. We have a variety of rumors, one of which is that Stonewall Jackson has appeared on McClellan's right, and is menacing thons for authority, there is some reason for believing that Jackson has arrived in the neighborhood of Richmond, and joined hiwing to a close, the Confederate leaders may conclude that Jackson can employ his forces in no way so well as to abandon the would be, by the diversions which the sudden appearance of Jackson, or some one else, in our rear would tend to produce. If Jackson has abandoned the Shenandoah, and is co-operating in the neighborhood of the Chickahominy, there will be, of courdone, I will say the country may rest assured that in case Jackson has made his appearance in the quarter alleged, he will fin unpleasant rumor, by way of City Point, that "Stonewall" Jackson turned the right of Gen. McClellan's line on Thursday lastn taken by our gunboats to-day, report that the rebel Generals Jackson, Price, and Beauregard are in Richmond, and will be a
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