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M. H. Dupee (search for this): chapter 11
is in a room under No. 7, with entrance from Prescott street. Miss M. E. Chamberlin is the teacher. No. 9 belongs to the town, and is on Common street. The regular teacher, Miss L. A. Skilton, was succeeded towards the end of the term by Miss M. H. Dupee. No. 10, also owned by the town, on the Training Field, in the rear of the Winthrop school, was under Miss A. W. Chamberlin, but now Miss Joanna S. Putnam is in charge. No. 11, in a room near the square, was kept by Miss Crocker, but lchapel. No. 13, at the Point, in a room hired of Mr. Ferrin, is kept by Miss Battles. No. 14, at Moulton's Point, established in 1837, is in a new house erected by the board on a lot belonging to the town. The teachers there have been Mrs. M. H. Dupee and Miss Lydia W. Locke. In October, 1838, a union exhibition of the first classes of the three upper schools was held in the Town Hall. It was a great pleasure to a large audience. Of the three high schools, the Bunker Hill (Neck) is
T. J. Elliot (search for this): chapter 11
$600. The whole amount now paid to teachers in these three districts is $990; by adding $240, four permanent teachers can be procured under the new arrangement. Thus, by increasing the expense one-fourth, the greater benefit to be derived will be fourfold. To make the Winter Hill and Milk Row schoolhouses more fit for primary schools, some repairs and alterations will be necessary. Primary schools within the peninsula:— No. 1, the school at the Neck, is kept in a building hired of T. J. Elliot: It has been under the charge of Miss Malvina B. Skilton over three years. No. 2, at Eden street, in a room hired of J. K. Frothingham, is under Miss Mary Walker, who has been longer in this employment than any other of our teachers. No. 3, in the vestry of the Methodist meeting house, is kept by Miss Charlotte A. Sawyer. No. 4, in School street, kept by Miss Susan L. Sawyer, before the end of the year (1838) had an offshoot taken from it, which was put under Miss Esther M. Hay.
class, primary, alphabetical charts, words of two syllables. Third class, Introduction to the National Spelling Book, Worcester's Second Book. Second class, Emerson's National Spelling Book, Easy Reader, Worcester's Second Book. First class, the New Testament, Emerson's National Spelling Book, the Analytical Reader, Hall'sEmerson's National Spelling Book, the Analytical Reader, Hall's Geography, Arithmetic Cards. Fourth class, grammar school, the Spelling Book, the Testament, the Analytical Reader, Parley's First Book of Geography. Third class, Beauties of the Bible, Worcester's Epitome of Geography, Worcester's Third Book, Boston Atlas, Frost's Grammar. Second class, Murray's Grammar and Exercises, Waook, Walker's Dictionary, Murray's Grammar and Exercises, Worcester's Geography, or Elements of History, Progressive Exercises in Composition. Writing schools, Emerson's Second Part, Colburn's Sequel, Boston Writing Slips. The following books may be used by the consent of the teachers and trustees: Blake's Astronomy, Grund's
Mary W. J. Evans (search for this): chapter 11
: the seats and benches are in bad condition, and the whole interior needs refitting. 1838-1839. The teachers of the district schools this season were: Mary W. J. Evans, of the Gardner; Clara D. Whittemore, of the Russell; Sarah M. Burnham, of Milk Row; Elizabeth P. Whittredge, of Prospect Hill; and Abby Mead, of Winter Hills you go by the meeting house of that place. There are about fifteen or twenty families in the district. During the summer this school was under the charge of Mrs. Evans. The average attendance was seventeen out of a total of nineteen. The teacher had classes in geometry, algebra, and natural philosophy, nor were the common br. Damon45.00 James Hove280.00 Prospect Hill:— Miss E. P. Whittredge120.00 Amos S. Allen210.00 Milk Row:— Miss S. M. Burnham120.00 Joel Pierce192.50 Russell district:— Clara D. Whittemore96.00 P. R. Russell, Jr120.00 Gardner district:— M. W. J. Evans96.00 William R. Bagnall120.00 (To be cont
Josiah Fairbanks (search for this): chapter 11
ct. In September Mr. Walker resigned at the Neck, to go to the Hawes school, South Boston, and Amos P. Baker was elected to succeed him. The death of Mr. Baker was reported December 20, and Aaron D. Capen was placed over this school. Through Amos Tufts and David Devens, Esq., executors of the will of Deacon Thomas Miller, the trustees received $100, the income of Which was to be used for the schools. Voted that the school recess shall not exceed ten minutes; that the trustees supply Mr. Fairbanks' school with three dozen slates; that all lady teachers in the primary schools be allowed nine afternoons in the course of the year to visit all the other primary schools; and that children may enter from the primary to the other schools at the age of seven, instead of eight, at the discretion of the teacher. Among the bills approved is one for $40.80 to Martin Draper. He may have finished out the winter term at the Russell school, as Mr. Hastings, January 28, requested to be dischar
n the teacher. They feel bound to say that their confidence in the talents, deportment, and qualifications of Miss Locke remain undiminished. They recommend that she continue in the school and be encouraged in the arduous duties assigned her. (Signed by Joseph T. Tufts and Charles Thompson.) We read of no further trouble, and her school was examined in its turn, October 24, at 9 o'clock. The winter schools outside the Neck were assigned as follows: At Milk Row to Luther (should be Calvin) Farrar; at Winter Hill to A. B. Magoun; at the Russell district to Henry I. Jewett; at the Gardner school to William E. Faulkner. As Mr. Magoun did not accept, Henry Bulfinch was appointed. Paul Willard, who signed the annual report, says: It would be unjust to; withhold an expression of the belief that the three high schools within the Neck, under the care of five masters, have reached a standing not before attained by them. These five teachers were Joshua Bates (salary, $800) and James Swan
William E. Faulkner (search for this): chapter 11
Locke remain undiminished. They recommend that she continue in the school and be encouraged in the arduous duties assigned her. (Signed by Joseph T. Tufts and Charles Thompson.) We read of no further trouble, and her school was examined in its turn, October 24, at 9 o'clock. The winter schools outside the Neck were assigned as follows: At Milk Row to Luther (should be Calvin) Farrar; at Winter Hill to A. B. Magoun; at the Russell district to Henry I. Jewett; at the Gardner school to William E. Faulkner. As Mr. Magoun did not accept, Henry Bulfinch was appointed. Paul Willard, who signed the annual report, says: It would be unjust to; withhold an expression of the belief that the three high schools within the Neck, under the care of five masters, have reached a standing not before attained by them. These five teachers were Joshua Bates (salary, $800) and James Swan ($700) at the Training Field school; Nathan Merrill ($700) and Reuben Swan, Jr. ($700), at the Town Hill, or Female
cause the high rate of living and the additional quantity of fuel which has been needed in consequence of the unusual cold weather. It was voted to give them $10 each, and to defer the subject of a greater raise to the next town meeting. Edwin Munroe and others of Milk Row district petition that the trustees will recommend the expediency of another school, Oliver Holden and others urge the removal of the cupola and bell from the Town Hill school, as it obstructs the view of the dial on Rev. Dr. Fay's church from the inhabitants in the north section of the town. The boy who rings it has to go some distance. He is consequently unable to return on time to commence his studies with the rest of his class. It is also an interruption to the female department. 1836-1837. The teachers for this summer outside the peninsula were: Miss Abby Mead, of the Winter Hill school; Miss Ann E. Whipple, of the Milk Row; Miss Burnham of the Russell; and Miss Wyman, of the Gardner. In accordance
O. C. Felton (search for this): chapter 11
Willard, Frothingham, and (later) Hawkins. This seems to be the first move on record looking to the establishment of the Prospect Hill school on Medford street. Voted that teachers receive no scholar into school after twenty minutes past the hour for commencing school. The only reference to teachers within the peninsula this year was November 8, 1833, when James Swan was elected writing master at the Training Field school, Reuben Swan, Jr., writing master in the Town Hill school, and O. C. Felton as master of the school at the Neck. As the last-named did not accept, William D. Swan was put in charge of this school. All three teachers received a salary of $650, which was raised to $700 later on. About the time which we are considering, the school for girls, which had been at the Training Field, was transferred to the Town Hill side, and the boys' school at the latter place now occupied the newer and more commodious building at the Training Field. I find no mention of this change
M. S. Fernald (search for this): chapter 11
The assistant is Miss Charlotte Cutter. The Harvard school, on Town Hill, is for girls. The teachers here are Paul Sweetser and Charles Kimball. (His term of service began before May, 1837.) Assistants: Miss M. E. Jones, Miss C. A. Johnson, Miss Fernald. The Winthrop school at the Training Field is for boys, the teachers being Mr. Bates and Samuel Swan, and for assistants, Miss Symmes and Miss Hay. Expenses appended to the trustees' report of May, 1839:— The bills for repairs in Russels (Winthrop school)900.00 and for teaching ancient languages.100.00 Samuel Swan800.00 Mary B. Symmes200.00 Sarah G. Hay200.00 Harvard school:— N. Merrill45.00 Paul H. Sweetser855.00 Charles Kimball800.00 Mary E. Jones$200.00 M. S. Fernald200.00 Bunker Hill— William D. Swan724.25 Robert Swan175.00 B. F. Tweed157.50 Charlotte Cutter200.00 Primary teachers, each $210, fourteen Schools2,940.00 Winter Hill:— Ann E. Newell20.00 Ellen A. Damon45.00 James Hove28
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