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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 29, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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March 27th (search for this): article 7
Western Navigation. Cleveland, March 27. --The screw steamer Portsmouth, of the New York and Erie Railroad line, left this port for Toledo last night, to take in the cargo for Dunkirk.
March 28th (search for this): article 1
Later from Europe.Arrival of the city of Baltimore. New York, March 28 --The steamship City of Baltimore, from Liverpool on the 13th instant, arrived this morning. The Jura, Kangaroo, Nova Scotian, and Fulton had arrived out. The city of Messina had surrendered to the Sardinian forces. The Hibernia, of the Galway line, would make her first trip on the 26th inst. The French Legislature was engaged in debating the Emperor's address. The main topic was his Orleans policy. Several members strongly denounced associating with the English policy, which had proved victorious in Italy. One member warned the Government against the suicidal policy, and predicted internal danger ahead. All was quiet at Warsaw. Russian troops continued to arrive. The Conference on the Syrian question was being held. It was expected an agreement would soon be decided upon. Dispatches were received announcing that the Mussulman of Syria were assuming a threatening att
March 28th (search for this): article 2
Hampton Roads. March 28th. Arrived, barks Glenwood, 35 days from Rio, with coffee; Tallulah, 42 days from Liverpool, with coal; Fanny Crenshaw, from Rio, for Bremen; brig Jason, from Trinidad; ship Rapid, 100 days from Kent's Island; schr. R. H. Pellen, 12 days from Matanzas. Norfolk, March 28.-- Arr'd, ship Russia, from Scotland, with coal. New York, March 26.--Arrived, schr. Ida Libby, (of Richmond, Va.,) Savannah. Baltimore, March 27.-- Cl'd, schr. R. C. Stanard, RichmondRio, with coffee; Tallulah, 42 days from Liverpool, with coal; Fanny Crenshaw, from Rio, for Bremen; brig Jason, from Trinidad; ship Rapid, 100 days from Kent's Island; schr. R. H. Pellen, 12 days from Matanzas. Norfolk, March 28.-- Arr'd, ship Russia, from Scotland, with coal. New York, March 26.--Arrived, schr. Ida Libby, (of Richmond, Va.,) Savannah. Baltimore, March 27.-- Cl'd, schr. R. C. Stanard, Richmond. Alexandria, March 27.--Sailed, schr. Samuel B. Grice, Norfolk.
March 28th (search for this): article 2
From Washington. Washington, March 28. --Nearly a dozen members of the press have been appointed to foreign and home offices, among them Jas. E. Harvey, a newspaper letter-writer, and former editor of the Philadelphia American. Joseph S. Wilson, former Commissioner of the General Land Office, has been returned to his former place as Chief Clerk of that Bureau. Capt. Josiah Gorgas, of the Ordnance Department, has resigned, owing, it is believed, to his being suspended as Superintendent of the Frankfort Arsenal. No troops, it is authoritatively stated, have been ordered to Fort Pickens. No Supreme Court nomination has been made. Mr. Archibold, late Chief Engineer U. S. N., has declined the same position in the Confederate Navy. The Convention, on the San Juan question, proposed by Great Britain, goes over to the next session. Confirmations by the Senate.--Carl Schurz, Minister to Spain; Cassius M. Clay, Minister to Russia; A. B. Dickinson, of
March 28th (search for this): article 3
Extra session U. S. Senate. Washington, March 28. --Mr. Trumbull introduced a resolution that the true way to preserve the Union is to enforce the laws.--The restraint to their enforcement encourages disunion. That it is the duty of the President to use all means in his power to hold and protect the public property and enforce the laws in Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, as in the other States of the Union. Mr. T. said this resolution expressed his views, and asked that it be printed. The Democratic Senators wanted an immediate vote, but it was not granted. After an Executive session, adjourned sine die.
March 28th (search for this): article 8
Northern Markets. New York, March 28. --Cotton advanced --Uplands middling 12 @ 12½. Flour 10@20 higher — Southern $5.50@5.80. Wheat 2 ½ @5 higher. Corn 1 higher — Mixed 66@70½ new Southern White 68@71. Pork firm — Mess $16.75@16.87. Lard quiet at 9@10 Whiskey firm at 17½@18. Sugar firm — Muscovado 4¼@5¾. Coffee fir2@34. Spirits Turpentine steady at 35 @37. Rosin dull at $1.25. Rice firm. Stocks dull and lower — N. Y. Centrals 78 ¾; Va. 6's 78½; Mo. 6's 66½. Norfolk,March 28.--Corn -- receipts 100,000 bushels — White 62@64; yellow 63@63½c.; mixed 60 Cotton firm — large sales and active; for good running lots 12½; select 12½; inferior dull at 10½@11½. Naval Stores in limited demand. Tar dull at $1.50@1.60. Staves active — R. O. hhd. 37; W. 66. Flour quiet. Baltimore,March 28.--Flour steady; Ohio $5@5.12. Wheat steady; red $1.27@1.30; white $1.40@1.65. Corn firm — white 53@57; yellow 56@58.--Provisions dull and unchanged. Coff
April 15th (search for this): article 6
kept within earshot during most of the interview, or, at least, near enough to prevent any free communication. He considers that the Fort can be reinforced either by a military operation, which, of course, would require a force not at the disposal of the President, or by the strategy already referred to, with its attendant hazards of a desperate conflict. The supply of provisions now in the garrison will probably enable Maj. Anderson to sustain his command reasonably well until the 15th of April. From all the facts disclosed by this investigation, it is manifest that Fort Sumter must be abandoned, or civil war inaugurated. Capt. Fox is cautious, intelligent, and well-informed, and was brought to the notice of the Government by Mr. Aspinwall, and some of the principal ship-owners of New York and Boston. Mr. Lamon, of Illinois, who also went to Charleston to make certain inquiries, will return to-morrow evening, or the next morning. After all the information has been laid be
ian Empire. France in round numbers has but 212,000 square miles. Austria in round numbers has 218,000 square miles. Ours is greater than both combined. It is greater than all France, Spain, Portugal and Great Britain, including England, Ireland and Scotland, together. In population we have upwards of five millions, according to the census of 1860; this includes white and black. The entire population, including white and black, of the original thirteen States, was less than 4,000,000 in 1790, and still less in '76, when the independence of our fathers was achieved. If they, with a less population, dared to maintain their independence against the greatest power on earth, shall we have any apprehension of maintaining ours now? "In point of material wealth and resources, we are greatly in advance of them. The taxable property of the Confederate States cannot be less than $22,000,000,000. This, I think, I venture but little in saying, may be considered as five times more than
her consent was influenced by a patriotic desire to preserve the peace and prevent the destruction of the Union. That consideration, he considered, was a potent reason why she should now turn her back upon the people who were so basely ungrateful for the efforts she had heretofore made. Mr. Goode went on to allude to the election of a sectional President as a cause for severance from the Union, taking the ground that it was sufficient, and reading from a speech of Millard Fillmore, in 1856, to substantiate his argument. The checks and balances of the Constitution he regarded as utterly impotent to restrain the party now in power. To show that the abolitionists had, in no way, backed down, be sketched their history in connection with political movements at the North, which, commencing with a comparatively small number, had constantly augmented, until it resulted in the election of Lincoln to the Presidency. He then read an extract from Lincoln's sentiments on the subject of s
than was included within the limits of the original thirteen States. It is an area of country more than double the territory of France or the Austrian Empire. France in round numbers has but 212,000 square miles. Austria in round numbers has 218,000 square miles. Ours is greater than both combined. It is greater than all France, Spain, Portugal and Great Britain, including England, Ireland and Scotland, together. In population we have upwards of five millions, according to the census of 1860; this includes white and black. The entire population, including white and black, of the original thirteen States, was less than 4,000,000 in 1790, and still less in '76, when the independence of our fathers was achieved. If they, with a less population, dared to maintain their independence against the greatest power on earth, shall we have any apprehension of maintaining ours now? "In point of material wealth and resources, we are greatly in advance of them. The taxable property of t
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