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Big Cabin Creek (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
omen report heavy firing in the vicinity of Cabin Creek General Cabell on the east side of Grand Rfloating in the River two days fighting at Cabin Creek gallant charge of the colored regiment toine all the positions between Flat Rock and Cabin Creek, and to select the one which would be the m We have been discussing the situation at Cabin Creek, and it was suggested that this night our oights overlooking the strip of timber along Cabin Creek, which is upwards of two miles wide at the our cavalry soon reached the north bank of Cabin Creek, to discover the stream raging and foaming eosho river, also caused the high waters in Cabin Creek; besides a more recent heavy rain falling orived at Grand Saline, three miles east of Cabin Creek, on the east bank of Grand River, the day bcould have detained our troops and train at Cabin Creek another day, General Cabell would probably , guard and artillery moved out and crossed Cabin Creek after twelve o'clock. The escort continued [11 more...]
Fort Scott (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ey are very confident of success this time, as they have made great preparations, and are well advised of the movements of the train and escort since they left Fort Scott. It was the intention of the first division that went out, he thinks, to examine all the positions between Flat Rock and Cabin Creek, and to select the one whi I made a good many inquiries concerning the cause of delay since they crossed the Neosho River at Hudson's ford. But we may now go back of the Neosho River to Fort Scott, and trace the progress of the train to Fort Blunt or Gibson. The train left Fort Scott with the following troops as an escort: One company of the Third WisconFort Scott with the following troops as an escort: One company of the Third Wisconsin cavalry, company C Ninth Kansas cavalry; six companies of the Second Colorado infantry; one section of Blair's battery, and one twelve-pound mountain howitzer. This force and the train reached Baxter Springs, on the 26th of June, where they were joined by Major Foreman of this division, with the six hundred men and one twelve
Port Gibson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
the Confederate armies in the east as reported by rebel pickets Vicksburg closely invested by General Grant Federal troops in southwest Missouri Federal supply train detained by high water at Neosho River Federal supplies running short at Fort Gibson high water in Grand River Indian women report heavy firing in the vicinity of Cabin Creek General Cabell on the east side of Grand River, near Cabin Creek, with artillery the suspense a National salute fired in honor of Independence day t Cabin Creek gallant charge of the colored regiment total rout of the enemy how the Federal troops crossed Cabin Creek under fire General Cabell unable to join General Cooper's division on account of high water arrival of supply train at Fort Gibson. The rebel pickets shouted across the river on the 24th instant, that our commissary train was on the way down, and that Colonel Dodd was commanding the escort to it, which is composed of two infantry regiments and four pieces of artillery.
Cassville (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
commanding the Missouri State troops in southwest Missouri, recently had a fight with General Marmaduke's cavalry and defeated it with considerable loss. We do not hear much about the movements of our troops southwest of Springfield and around Cassville, but hope that they have not been idle. We have expected however, that they would have moved forward and re-occupied Fayetteville before this. Had they done so a month ago, it would have relieved us of the necessity of using so many of the tt. Even at this moment it is probable that a force of the enemy is moving from Arkansas northeast of us, to attack our supply train. If there are as many volunteer troops in Southwest Missouri as there were nearly two months ago when I was at Cassville, it is surely strange that the Department Commander does not permit them to march into Arkansas and seek the enemy. At any rate a large infantry force is not required in Southwest Missouri. A dispatch from Major Foreman states that our com
Baxter Spring (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
oon have been settled. As it is now eleven days since Major Foreman left here with his force of six hundred men and one twelve-pound mountain howitzer, he has had ample time to march as far north as Hudson's Ford on the Neosho, or perhaps to Baxter Spring, fifteen miles still further north. In either event he will probably advise Colonel Williams, commanding the First regiment Kansas colored volunteers at Baxter Spring, of the preparations that the enemy have been making to capture the train.Baxter Spring, of the preparations that the enemy have been making to capture the train. As Colonel Williams has the reputation of being a gallant officer, and as he will doubtless be anxious to give his colored troops an opportunity of displaying their valor on the field, we feel quite sure, from what we have heard of him, that, if his orders are not too positive to remain where he is, he will accompany the train with his regiment. At such a time as this he should not be hampered with orders that would keep his regiment inactive when it is needed, within the hearing of booming
Flat Rock (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ing, July 1st, and he states that just before he left the enemy on the 28th ultimo, General Cooper had sent out another division of cavalry to join the force that had gone out several days previous. He says that they are very confident of success this time, as they have made great preparations, and are well advised of the movements of the train and escort since they left Fort Scott. It was the intention of the first division that went out, he thinks, to examine all the positions between Flat Rock and Cabin Creek, and to select the one which would be the most advantageous for making the attack. An experienced engineer officer accompanied them, so that nothing should be laking to make the organization of the expedition complete. Well, from all the information we have been able to obtain, it is regarded as certain that the enemy's forces have converged at a point about forty miles above here in the neighborhood of Cabin Creek, yesterday evening (June 30th). Our train and escort,
Saline River (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
and artillery, passed their places yesterday evening, moving westward in the direction of Grand Saline. This, we are informed through our scouts, is the force I mentioned about a week ago as being egement has taken place or is in progress. Several Indian women who have just arrived from Grand Saline state that they heard artillery and musketry firing yesterday evening in the direction of Cabin Creek. They also state that they heard of a large force of the enemy being encamped near Grand Saline, who were unable to.cross Grand River on account of its being so full, and that the river is unusthis point. It is not likely that it has been fordable at any point between this post and Grand Saline for the last four days. To-day being the 4th, or Independence Day, a national salute of thir General Cabell, with fifteen hundred cavalry and four pieces of artillery, had arrived at Grand Saline, three miles east of Cabin Creek, on the east bank of Grand River, the day before, and was unab
Kansas (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
t be as wholesome as beef and mutton. But there is an old saying, That which is one man's food, is another man's poison. Grand River has risen considerably since June 29th, and we hear that there have been heavy rains in the direction of southern Kansas recently. The rise in the river that is just commencing here now, is probably from the same rains that caused the big rise in the Neosho, and detained our train there several days. How this rise in the Grand River will affect the operatioountain howitzer, he has had ample time to march as far north as Hudson's Ford on the Neosho, or perhaps to Baxter Spring, fifteen miles still further north. In either event he will probably advise Colonel Williams, commanding the First regiment Kansas colored volunteers at Baxter Spring, of the preparations that the enemy have been making to capture the train. As Colonel Williams has the reputation of being a gallant officer, and as he will doubtless be anxious to give his colored troops an o
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
eral hours before we could reach that point. The troops of this division, however, are too busily engaged elsewhere to make a dash on the enemy's camp. The rebel pickets on Sunday, 28th instant, stated that they had just heard that the Confederate army in the east, under General Lee, has recently gained a great victory over the Federal army, and that our army has fallen back to the immediate vicinity of Washington. They also stated that General Lee is preparing for another invasion of Maryland, and intends entering Pennsylvania with the army of Northern Virginia, with the view of capturing Philadelphia and Baltimore. Though, in our isolation here, news from the East is a long time reaching us, yet that which comes shows that both the Federal and Confederate armies are displaying great activity, and that a great conflict is imminent. The loss of a great battle now, or the capture by the enemy of either of the large cities above mentioned, would be extremely damaging to our cause
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ate armies in the east as reported by rebel pickets Vicksburg closely invested by General Grant Federal troops in southwest Missouri Federal supply train detained by high water at Neosho River Federal supplies running short at Fort Gibson high we, state that it was currently reported when they left, that General Brown, commanding the Missouri State troops in southwest Missouri, recently had a fight with General Marmaduke's cavalry and defeated it with considerable loss. We do not hear muchnemy is moving from Arkansas northeast of us, to attack our supply train. If there are as many volunteer troops in Southwest Missouri as there were nearly two months ago when I was at Cassville, it is surely strange that the Department Commander does not permit them to march into Arkansas and seek the enemy. At any rate a large infantry force is not required in Southwest Missouri. A dispatch from Major Foreman states that our commissary train was detained on the north side of the Neosho ri
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