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Leopold Gilsa (search for this): chapter 3.28
nce he established his division,--the Second Brigade, under McLean, next to Schurz's first, and then pushing out on the pike for half a mile he deployed the other, Gilsa's, at right angles facing west, connecting his two parts by a thin skirmish-line. Colonel Gilsa's brigade was afterward drawn back, still facing west at right angColonel Gilsa's brigade was afterward drawn back, still facing west at right angles to the line, so as to make a more solid connection, and so that, constituting, as it did, the main right flank, the reserves of the corps could be brought more promptly to its support, by extending its right to the north, should an enemy by any possible contingency get so far around. A section of Dieckmann's battery which looke batteries, twelve guns, were put upon a ridge abreast of the little church and pointed toward the north-west, with a view to sweep all approaches to the north of Gilsa, firing up a gradually ascending slope. This ridge, where I stood during the battle, was central, and, besides, enabled the artillerymen to enfilade either roadwa
ery sort of organization that lay in the path of the mad current of panic-stricken men, Colonel von Gilsa's report of the crisis is as follows: . . . A patrol of the 45th New York regiment repThird Division, but I did not find the second line; it was abandoned before we reached it. Von Gilsa's brigade lost 133 killed and wounded out of an effective of 1400 men.--editors. had to give wts General Devens's report is very explicit upon this point, and states as follows: Colonel von Gilsa's skirmishers were, between 3 and 4 o'clock in the afternoon, attacked by the skirmishers of the enemy with the evident intention of feeling our position. After this Colonel von Gilsa's skirmishers were pushed farther to the front, and the major-general commanding the corps again rode doof General Barlow's brigade, which I had previously located in reserve and en ├ęchelon with Colonel von Gilsa's, so as to cover his right flank. This was the only general reserve I had. Stonewall
Winfield S. Hancock (search for this): chapter 3.28
and the pike. This pike is an old roadway which skirts the northern edge of Talley's farm, and makes an angle of some forty degrees with the Orange Plank road. At dawn of that eventful day General Hooker was at Chancellorsville. Slocum and Hancock were just in his front, infantry and artillery deployed to the right and left. French's division was in his rear. Meade occupied the extreme left, and my corps, the Eleventh, the right. Sickles connected me with Slocum. Our lines covered betens states in his official report that at intervals between 11 A. M. and 6:30 P. M. he reported to corps headquarters that the enemy in force was threatening his front and his right flank.--editors. Slocum went forward to the aid of Sickles, and Hancock was behind him with support. Next, the enemy was reported to be in full retreat. General Hooker so telegraphed to Sedgwick; Captain Moore, of his staff, who had gone out with Birney to see the attack upon Jackson, came hurriedly to me with an
A. T. Hawkins (search for this): chapter 3.28
nature of the country in the neighborhood of the three adjoining farms, Dowdall's Talley's, and Hawkins's, became well known to the Army of the Potomac in subsequent experiences, never to be forgotteurz says: Dowdall's Tavern in 1884. The Wilderness Church (in the left middle-ground) and Hawkins's farm (on the right) as seen from the Plank road in front of Dowdall's Tavern. Our right motion. Schurz was anxious and, with my approval, moved a part of his reserves to the north of Hawkins's farm into good position to cover Devens's flank. Devens held at least two regiments well in en up a strong position on the crest of a hill in the open field. This position was the one on Hawkins's farm where Devens's and Schurz's reserves began their fight. But wave after wave of Confederhad eagerly observed their bravery, saw these reserves also give way, and the hill and crest on Hawkins's farm were quickly in the hands of the men in gray. In justice to the men of Devens's divis
Joseph Hayes (search for this): chapter 3.28
nowski's brigade, about half on the front and half in reserve. Schurz's right brigade was that of Schimmelfennig, disposed in the same manner, a part deployed and the remainder kept a few hundred yards back for a reserve. Schurz's front line of infantry extended along the old turnpike and faced to the south-west. The right division of the corps was commanded Map: position of the 11th Corps at 6pm. May 2, 1863. by General Charles Devens, afterward attorney-general in the cabinet of President Hayes. Devens and I together had carefully reconnoitered both the Orange Plank road and the old turnpike for at least three miles toward the west. After this reconnoissance he established his division,--the Second Brigade, under McLean, next to Schurz's first, and then pushing out on the pike for half a mile he deployed the other, Gilsa's, at right angles facing west, connecting his two parts by a thin skirmish-line. Colonel Gilsa's brigade was afterward drawn back, still facing west at ri
Ambrose P. Hill (search for this): chapter 3.28
two miles distant toward Fredericksburg, and thus between us and Sedgwick. Lee had immediately with him the divisions of McLaws, Anderson, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, besides some cavalry under Stuart. He The old Chancellor house, burned during the battle. From a photograph. held, for his line of battle, a comparativelusted to Lieutenant-General Jackson with his three divisions. Jackson's movement, with a stronger indication of battle, began at sunrise, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, in the order named, following the old road by the Catherine Furnace, there shoving off farther south to get beyond the sight of our men; then sweeping around bon Major-General Carl Schurz. From a photograph. commanding), with Ramseur on the right following Colquitt. After another interval followed the division of A. P. Hill. The advance Confederate division had more men in it than there were in the Eleventh Corps, now in position. Counting the ranks of this formidable column, beg
Louis Hoffmann (search for this): chapter 3.28
his reserves to the north of Hawkins's farm into good position to cover Devens's flank. Devens held at least two regiments well in hand, for the same purpose, and Steinwehr's whole division I knew could just face about and defend the same point. A few companies of cavalry came from Pleasonton. I sent them out. Go out beyond my right; go far, and let me know if an assault is coming. All my staff, Asmussen, Meysenberg, Whittlesey, C. H. Howard, Schofield, Dessauer, Stinson, Schirmer, and Hoffmann, were keenly on the alert. We had not a very good position, it is true, but we did expect to make a good strong fight should the enemy come. General Hooker's circular order to Slocum and Howard neither reached me, nor, to my knowledge, Colonel Meysenberg, my adjutant-general. See pp. 219 and 220. The original dispatch is not on file in the War Records Office, but a copy of it exists in Hooker's Letters sent book and in one of the two Letters received books of Howard's headquarters.
Joseph Hooker (search for this): chapter 3.28
lank road. At dawn of that eventful day General Hooker was at Chancellorsville. Slocum and Hanco four miles south from Ely's ford, where were Hooker's nearest cavalry flankers. In his report aft Lee's, was so badly handled by the enemy that Hooker at last deemed it safer to return to the north the enemy's charge. It was occasioned by General Hooker, with Colonel Comstock and a few staff-off purpose. About midday Sickles received General Hooker's orders to advance south cautiously. Sooenemy was reported to be in full retreat. General Hooker so telegraphed to Sedgwick; Captain Moore,n, came hurriedly to me with an order from General Hooker for my reserve brigade, Barlow's. Major Hoood strong fight should the enemy come. General Hooker's circular order to Slocum and Howard neitWar Records Office, but a copy of it exists in Hooker's Letters sent book and in one of the two Letthave been made in the latter part of June. In Hooker's book a notation in red ink reads, Copy furni[14 more...]
C. H. Howard (search for this): chapter 3.28
ld the enemy come. General Hooker's circular order to Slocum and Howard neither reached me, nor, to my knowledge, Colonel Meysenberg, my ads Letters sent book and in one of the two Letters received books of Howard's headquarters. The entry in Howard's book appears to have been maHoward's book appears to have been made in the latter part of June. In Hooker's book a notation in red ink reads, Copy furnished General Howard ; and the inference is that it wasGeneral Howard ; and the inference is that it was this copy that was entered in Howard's book in June.--editors. From some confused notion it was issued to Slocum and Howard, when Slocum was Howard's book in June.--editors. From some confused notion it was issued to Slocum and Howard, when Slocum was no longer within two miles of me, and had not been in command of my corps after Hooker's arrival at Chancellorsville. Slocum, naturally suppoHoward, when Slocum was no longer within two miles of me, and had not been in command of my corps after Hooker's arrival at Chancellorsville. Slocum, naturally supposing that I had a copy, would not think of forwarding a joint order to me after that, and certainly no such order came to me. But Generals Devs, consisting of Barlow's stanch brigade. Steinwehr and I, with Major Howard as guide, went far enough southward to see what was to be done w
Charles H. Howard (search for this): chapter 3.28
protect General Devens's exposed right flank. As to pickets, each division had a good line of them. My aide, Major Charles H. Howard, assisted in connecting them between divisions, and during the 2d of May that fearless and faithful staff-officed noisy cavalry. The Wilderness Church. From a War-time photograph. See previous page. The Confederates carrying Howard's breastworks. About sunrise at Dowdall's I heard cheering. It was a hearty sound, with too much bass in it for tha see the attack upon Jackson, came hurriedly to me with an order from General Hooker for my reserve brigade, Barlow's. Major Howard rode rapidly to Sickles, that he might point out exactly where to locate the brigade. The major was also to ascertainout beyond my right; go far, and let me know if an assault is coming. All my staff, Asmussen, Meysenberg, Whittlesey, C. H. Howard, Schofield, Dessauer, Stinson, Schirmer, and Hoffmann, were keenly on the alert. We had not a very good position, it
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