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ommissary stores found in Mobile, alone, was estimated at $2,000,000. In that city Veatch found a thousand men, left behind, who became prisoners, and upon the works for its immediate defense were one hundred and fifty cannon. Immediately after the surrender of the city, the navy was engaged in gathering up torpedoes in the channels, and blowing up and removing the obstructions in them. In this dangerous business three small vessels were destroyed by the explosion of torpedoes. On the 4th of May, Ebenezer Farrand, one of the traitors who placed the navy-yard near Pensacola in the hands of the Conspirators (see pages 168 and 169, volume I<*> in 1861, now in command of the few vessels belonging to the Confederates in the waters of Alabama, formally surrendered the whole, and the forces under his command, to Admiral Thatcher, at Sidney, on the terms which Grant had given to Lee a month before. Let us now consider the operations of General Wilson, in the field, while Canby was eff
the Alabama River, at Selma, which had been made brimful by recent rains, and then he Ruins of Confederate Foundery. this was the appearance of a portion of the city of Selma, when the writer sketched it, in April, 1866. t; was the site of the great Confederate iron-foundery there. hastened April 6, 1865. to Cahawba, the ancient capital of Alabama, This was the place where De Soto crossed the Alabama River, on his march toward the Mississippi River, which he discovered in the year 1541. a few miles down the stream, to meet General Forrest, under a flag of truce, by appointment, for the purpose of making arrangements for an exchange of prisoners. They met at the fine mansion of Mr. Mathews, This gentleman informed the writer that the two officers dined at his house; and after Forrest had eaten his food and drunk his wine, he plundered his plantation on leaving. near the landing in sight of a large cotton warehouse, on the high bank of the river, from which Wilson, on his
us business three small vessels were destroyed by the explosion of torpedoes. On the 4th of May, Ebenezer Farrand, one of the traitors who placed the navy-yard near Pensacola in the hands of the Conspirators (see pages 168 and 169, volume I<*> in 1861, now in command of the few vessels belonging to the Confederates in the waters of Alabama, formally surrendered the whole, and the forces under his command, to Admiral Thatcher, at Sidney, on the terms which Grant had given to Lee a month before. nk of the the red-bud and peach blossom. It was eight o'clock in the evening before we arrived at Montgomery, and found lodgings at the Exchange Hotel, from whose balcony, the reader may remember, Jefferson Davis harangued the populace early in 1861, after a speech at the railway station, in which he said, concerning himself and fellow-conspirators:--We are determined to maintain our position, and make all who oppose us smell Southern powder and feel Southern steel. See page 257, volume I.
March 4th, 1861 AD (search for this): chapter 19
ily laden Union Prison at Cahawba. sketched from a steamboat, in April, 1866. steamboats, which had fled up that stream for safety Montgomery was formally surrendered to Wilson, by the city authorities with five guns, and a large quantity of small-arms, which were destroyed. So it was that the original Capital of the Confederacy of Rebels was repossessed by the Government without hinderance and the flag of the Republic was unfurled in triumph over the State House, where, on the 4th of March, 1861, the first Confederate flag Was given to the breeze, when it was adopted as the ensign of the Confederacy by the Provisional Government, at Montgomery. See page 256, volume I. Wilson paused two days at Montgomery, and then pushed on eastward toward the Chattahoochee River, the boundary between Alabama and Georgia,--Columbus, in the latter State, ninety miles distant, being his chief objective. At Tuskegee, Colonel La Grange was detached and sent to West Point at the crossing of
the interior. The conduct of the expedition against Mobile was assigned to General E. R. S. Canby, then commanding the West Mississippi Army, with headquarters at New Orleans; and the co-operating movement was intrusted to General J. H. Wilson, the eminent cavalry leader, under the direction of General Thomas. Mobile, at the beginning of 1865, was thoroughly fortified by three continuous lines of earth-works around the entire city. The first was constructed by Captain C. T. Lieurner, in 1862, at an average distance of three miles out from the business streets, and comprised fifteen redoubts. In 1863, after the fall of Vicksburg, when an attack upon Mobile was expected, General D. Leadbetter See page 174, volume I., and page 38, volume II. constructed a second line of works, which passed through the suburbs of the city, comprising sixteen inclosed and strong redoubts. It was then estimated that a garrison of ten thousand effective men might, with these fortifications, defend
nding the West Mississippi Army, with headquarters at New Orleans; and the co-operating movement was intrusted to General J. H. Wilson, the eminent cavalry leader, under the direction of General Thomas. Mobile, at the beginning of 1865, was thoroughly fortified by three continuous lines of earth-works around the entire city. The first was constructed by Captain C. T. Lieurner, in 1862, at an average distance of three miles out from the business streets, and comprised fifteen redoubts. In 1863, after the fall of Vicksburg, when an attack upon Mobile was expected, General D. Leadbetter See page 174, volume I., and page 38, volume II. constructed a second line of works, which passed through the suburbs of the city, comprising sixteen inclosed and strong redoubts. It was then estimated that a garrison of ten thousand effective men might, with these fortifications, defend Mobile against a besieging army of forty thousand men. In 1864, a third line of earth-works was constructed by
ess streets, and comprised fifteen redoubts. In 1863, after the fall of Vicksburg, when an attack upon Mobile was expected, General D. Leadbetter See page 174, volume I., and page 38, volume II. constructed a second line of works, which passed through the suburbs of the city, comprising sixteen inclosed and strong redoubts. It was then estimated that a garrison of ten thousand effective men might, with these fortifications, defend Mobile against a besieging army of forty thousand men. In 1864, a third line of earth-works was constructed by Lieutenant-Colonel V. Sheliha, about half-way between the other two, and included nineteen heavy bastioned forts and eight redoubts, making, in all the fortifications around the city, fifty-eight forts and redoubts, with connecting breast works. The parapets of the forts were from fifteen to twenty feet in thickness, and the ditches, through which the tide-water of the harbor flowed, were about twenty feet in depth and thirty in width. Besides
August, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 19
us, 519. La Grange's expedition to West Point capture of Fort Tyler, 520. Croxton's destructive raid, 521. the author's journey from Savannah to Montgomery, 522. a day at Montgomery the State capital, 523. at Selma, Mobile, and New Orleans, 524. departure for Port Hudson and Vicksburg, 525. The repossession of Alabama was an important part of General Grant's comprehensive plan of campaign for the winter and spring of 1865. The capture of the forts at the entrance to Mobile Bay Aug., 1864. was a necessary preliminary movement. Had Farragut then known how weakly Mobile was defended, he and Granger might easily have captured it. At that time there were no troops in or immediately about the city. The artillery, also, had been called away to oppose A. J. Smith's troops, then approaching from Memphis (see page 248), and then they were sent to West Point, in Georgia, for the support of General Hood, where they erected a strong work, commanding the railway and the Chattahoche
possession of Alabama was an important part of General Grant's comprehensive plan of campaign for the winter and spring of 1865. The capture of the forts at the entrance to Mobile Bay Aug., 1864. was a necessary preliminary movement. Had Farragut to General J. H. Wilson, the eminent cavalry leader, under the direction of General Thomas. Mobile, at the beginning of 1865, was thoroughly fortified by three continuous lines of earth-works around the entire city. The first was constructed by C Corps of the Military Division of the West Mississippi, and numbered about ten thousand effective men. Early in January, 1865. these were concentrated at Kenner, ten miles above New Orleans, and General F. Steele See page 252. was assigned to ta at Gravelly Springs and Waterloo, in Lauderdale County, Alabama. These had been thoroughly disciplined, when, in March, 1865. they were prepared for an expedition into Alabama, having for its object co-operation with Canby in the reduction of Mobi
March, 1865 AD (search for this): chapter 19
ort Gaines to Danley's Ferry. Meanwhile, a feint on Mobile was made to attract attention while the main body was concentrating at Fish River. This was done by Moore's brigade of the Sixteenth Corps, which landed, with artillery, on Cedar Point, on the west side of the bay, under fire of the squadron. They drove away the Confederate occupants of the Point, and followed them to Fowle River, where the pursuers were ordered to cross the bay and rejoin the corps, which they did on the 23d. March, 1865. The movement had created much uneasiness in Mobile, for Moore's force was reported there to be from four thousand to six thousand strong. While these movements were in progress on the borders of the bay, General Steele, with Hawkins's division of negro troops, and Lucas's cavalry, had been marching from Pensacola to Blakely, ten miles north of Mobile, destroying, on the way, the railroad at Pollard, and inducing the belief that Canby's real objective was Montgomery, and not Mobile.
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