hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor 654 2 Browse Search
United States (United States) 236 0 Browse Search
Department de Ville de Paris (France) 212 0 Browse Search
France (France) 182 0 Browse Search
William H. Prescott 159 3 Browse Search
Edmund Head 136 56 Browse Search
Charles Lyell 113 21 Browse Search
Edward Everett 92 10 Browse Search
Austria (Austria) 90 0 Browse Search
Saxony (Saxony, Germany) 88 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). Search the whole document.

Found 349 total hits in 129 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...
April 16th, 1860 AD (search for this): chapter 15
pleased with them, and urged him to take the place, yet he at one time determined to decline the office, certainly unless the library were to be open for the free circulation of most of its books, and unless it were to be dedicated, in the first instance, rather to satisfying the wants of the less favored classes of the community, than—like all public libraries then in existence—to satisfying the wants of scholars, men of science, and cultivated men generally. See letter to Trustees, April 16, 1860, printed in the Eighth Annual Report, pp. 34, 35. Mr. Everett's opinion was not changed; but seeing Mr. Ticknor's determination to co-operate in no other plan, and perhaps feeling himself the difficulties of beginning with any other, he agreed at last—though not convinced—that the experiment of a popular institution of the freest sort should be tried, and the two friends accepted their appointments as trustees of a prospective library. From that moment their co-operation in its aff
eld in abeyance by his judgment as a citizen. In April, 1860, he gave to the Library 2,400 volumes of works of such a high character that he made it a condition that two thousand of them should not circulate, and in October of the same year he presented to it one hundred and forty-three volumes, forming a special collection on Moliere, with similar restrictions; while in October, 1864, he gave one hundred and sixty volumes of Provencal literature, under still more stringent conditions. In 1861, also, being consulted as to the conditions to be attached to a bequest of money to the Library, he reverted to an idea, entertained by him long before, which was adopted, and the income was required to be expended for books, none of which should have been published less than five years. Finally, by his last will he gave to this institution, which he had cherished and had done all in his power to perfect, the invaluable collection of Spanish books, to the formation of which he had devoted
October, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 15
, the most valuable part of the Library, Mr. Ticknor began to give proof that his instincts as a scholar were only held in abeyance by his judgment as a citizen. In April, 1860, he gave to the Library 2,400 volumes of works of such a high character that he made it a condition that two thousand of them should not circulate, and in October of the same year he presented to it one hundred and forty-three volumes, forming a special collection on Moliere, with similar restrictions; while in October, 1864, he gave one hundred and sixty volumes of Provencal literature, under still more stringent conditions. In 1861, also, being consulted as to the conditions to be attached to a bequest of money to the Library, he reverted to an idea, entertained by him long before, which was adopted, and the income was required to be expended for books, none of which should have been published less than five years. Finally, by his last will he gave to this institution, which he had cherished and had do
October 18th, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 15
p by Mr. Ticknor and Mr. Everett,—because he saw the importance to his native town of such a library as is there recommended. In his letter to Mr. Seaver, October 1, 1852, Mr. Bates says, he is impressed with the importance to rising and future generations of such a library as is recommended. Here, then, was the founding of a library, a gift of $50,000, with the condition annexed, that the city should erect a suitable building for the use of the institution. See vote of Trustees, October 18, 1864, in Memorial of Joshua Bates, pp. 14, 15. And now began the practical labors of organizing the scheme, collecting the books, and perfecting the details of a system as yet entirely new and untried. To follow Mr. Ticknor minutely and closely through all the steps of the development of this work would require more space than belongs to the subject here, but at certain points his influence and his exertions may be described. The whole was in harmony with his life-long purpose, to make h
rs. Thus the use of the Library was made an object of ambition in the schools. Another and a favorite proposal of his was much discussed and somewhat opposed among the Trustees,—that of allowing frequenters of the Library to ask for books to be purchased, and for that purpose to supply cards or blanks for such applications. He gained this point, also, and persevered in having it not only offered but urged, although for ten years this great and useful privilege was not appreciated. Until 1865 the public could not be induced to understand or avail itself of this opportunity, and, before that time, the Trustees had come fully to apprehend the value to them of such requests, in pointing out what was desirable to purchase, and would be immediately useful. In the matter of furnishing duplicates of books most asked for, it was not easy, under the system first adopted, to discover what were the most sought, and a good deal of extra work had to be done, in the course of which Mr. Tickn
May 15th, 1867 AD (search for this): chapter 15
nning with any other, he agreed at last—though not convinced—that the experiment of a popular institution of the freest sort should be tried, and the two friends accepted their appointments as trustees of a prospective library. From that moment their co-operation in its affairs was cordial and complete; and although Mr. Everett never fully believed in the practical benefits of Mr. Ticknor's plan, he was perfectly faithful to his promise, that it should have a fair chance. In a note of May 15, 1867, from Mr. Jewett, the first Superintendent of the Public Library, to Mr. Ticknor, he says: Few persons alive know as well as you and I do, that with regard to the great features of the plan,—the free circulation of the books, and the paramount importance attached to the popular department,—Mr. Everett had, from the beginning, serious misgivings, and that he yielded his own doubts only to your urgency. He repeated to me within, I think, a week previous to his death, the doubts whic
fe of Washington; ten copies of the Life of Amos Lawrence, a merchant of Boston; twelve copies of the Teacher's Assistant, and some others. For a time many of these kept well in circulation, especially Miss Nightingale's excellent little book; but at the end of six months the demand for them had substantially ceased. he did not lose faith in his theory that, the taste for reading once formed, the standard of that taste would rise. He would have rejoiced in the absolute proof produced, since 1873, of the steady gain in the proportion of useful books taken from the Library, after increased facilities had been afforded for their selection, by the admirable annotated Catalogue of works of the higher class prepared by Mr. Winsor. The percentage of increased demand for works of travel, biography, etc., over the increase of general circulation, has continued to be quite remarkable for more than two years, since the publication of this valuable Catalogue. Being now at ease about that
Louis Agassiz (search for this): chapter 15
ill go, I will do more for the Library at home than I have hitherto done, in order that your absence may be less severely felt. While this question remained unsettled, no time was lost with regard to Mr. Bates's new donations. Mr. Ticknor immediately began personally to collect, from men distinguished in special departments, lists of works on their several subjects, which ought to be on the shelves of a great library, thus getting contributions of much consequence from such men as Professors Agassiz, Bond, Cooke, Felton, Hayward, Holmes, Lovering, Pierce, and Dr. John Ware; from Professor W. B. Rogers and Judge Curtis; from Colonel Thayer of the Army and Captain Goldsborough of the Navy; from engineers and architects, clergymen and men of letters. With these, and with all the bibliographical resources they could command, Mr. Ticknor and Mr. Jewett worked, in Mr. Ticknor's library, for more than two months, Mr. Jewett remaining there eight hours a day, preparing the lists that wer
Eugenio Alberi (search for this): chapter 15
orical writer, whose works he valued very highly, and whom he advised me strongly to visit as a person who would receive me kindly, and give me the best of literary help about Italian affairs and books, as he has lived in Italy above twenty years. Mr. Ticknor had known Baron von Reumont in Rome twenty years before, when he was attache to the legation of Baron Bunsen, and he says of him, in all sorts of ways he has turned out an invaluable friend. On his recommendation, he selected Professor Eugenio Alberi as the agent of the Library, after hearing much good of him from many persons, and among the rest from the Grand Duke and the Marquis Gino Capponi. Thus Mr. Ticknor's former associations with literary and distinguished persons gave him valuable aid in his present undertakings. In Rome, where he passed the winter, he had no need, of course, to search for agents; but he busied himself in buying books, keeping a young man constantly employed in seeking out whatever was curious and
han I shall probably use, and certainly enough to purchase such books, not on any of our lists, as I may find cheap and tempting, and to establish agencies in Leipzig, Florence, and perhaps elsewhere; beginning the purchases, and putting the agents in communication with Mr. Bates for subsequent directions and resources . . . . I began in London, buying, perhaps, four hundred volumes, which you will easily recognize. . . . . To this city-Brussels—I took a letter from M. Van De Weyer for Mons. Alvin, Conservateur of the Royal Library, who at once placed entirely at my disposition Mons. Charles Ruelens, a scholar full of bibliographical and literary knowledge, who is on the staff of the Library to purchase its books all over Europe. Under his guidance I have bought about seven hundred and fifty volumes . . . . . I have not bought a book here or in London, and shall not, I suppose, buy one anywhere, that I would sell in Boston for twice its cost. The books I have bought of the book
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ...