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P. F. Faison (search for this): chapter 9
osses were: killed, 595; wounded, 4,074; missing, 653. North Carolina losses were: killed, 173; wounded, 1,294. It will thus be seen that just a little less than a third of the killed and the wounded were from North Carolina. General Cooke was among the wounded. During the interval between the battle of Seven Pines and the battle of Fredericksburg, there were not many important military events in North Carolina. The duty of organizing new regiments still went on. The Fifty-sixth, Col. P. F. Faison; the Fifty-seventh, Col. A. C. Godwin; the Fifty-eighth, Col. J. B. Palmer; the Fifty-ninth (cavalry), Col. D. D. Ferrebee; the Sixteenth, Col. W. M. Hardy; the Sixty-first, Col. J. D. Radcliffe; the Sixty-second, Col. R. G. A. Love; the Sixty-third (cavalry), Col. J. H. McNeil; and the Sixty-fourth, Col. L. M. Allen, were all organized during this time. Major Gordon, in his article on the Organization of the North Carolina Troops, states: When the legislature, in 1861, directed Gen
D. D. Ferrebee (search for this): chapter 9
nts still went on. The Fifty-sixth, Col. P. F. Faison; the Fifty-seventh, Col. A. C. Godwin; the Fifty-eighth, Col. J. B. Palmer; the Fifty-ninth (cavalry), Col. D. D. Ferrebee; the Sixteenth, Col. W. M. Hardy; the Sixty-first, Col. J. D. Radcliffe; the Sixty-second, Col. R. G. A. Love; the Sixty-third (cavalry), Col. J. H. McNeil;. General Robertson, having under his command the Eleventh North Carolina, Colonel Leventhorpe; the Thirty-first, Colonel Jordan; 600 dismounted cavalrymen from Ferrebee's and Evans' regiments; and a section of Moore's battery, under Lieut. N. McClees, had been sent to burn the bridge and dispute Foster's crossing should he attem the advantage of position. The point occupied by his troops being narrow, not more than one regiment at a time could engage him. I therefore held Leventhorpe, Ferrebee and Evans in reserve, leaving the artillery [two pieces], Thirty-first regiment, and two picked companies in front. The cannonading from the enemy's batteries b
G. N. Folk (search for this): chapter 9
e Sixty-first regiment, from which there is no report, were 40 killed and 177 wounded. During the operations mentioned above, North Carolina was represented in the Western army by the following regiments: Twenty-ninth, Col. R. B. Vance; Thirty-ninth, Col. D. Coleman; Fifty-eighth, Col. J. B. Palmer; Sixty-second, Col. R. G. A. Love; Sixty-fourth, Col. L. M. Allen; Sixty-ninth (Thomas' legion), Col. W. H. Thomas; Fifth cavalry battalion, Maj. A. H. Baird; Seventh cavalry battalion, Lieut.-Col. G. N. Folk, and Lieutenant-Colonel Walker's cavalry battalion. In September the Sixty-ninth regiment (Thomas' legion) was ordered to Powell's valley. This regiment was raised in the mountains of North Carolina and had in it two companies of Cherokee Indians. On this march, one of these Indian companies became engaged in a sharp little battle with the Federals, and Lieutenant Astoo-gah-sto-ga, who is described by Major Stringfield of that regiment as a splendid specimen of Indian manhood,
Confederate casualties were 2 wounded. General Foster with 5,oco men left Washington, N. C., forere not in force enough to do more than retard Foster's movements. Captain Newkirk, of the cavalr days before the battle of Fredericksburg, General Foster left New Bern, N. C., with a force of 10,0 regiment was posted on the west side to delay Foster's advance. The Ninth New Jersey and Wessell'sm Kinston bridge. General Evans had, to oppose Foster's 10,000 men, the Seventh, Twenty-second, Twen just arrived, under Col. S. H. Rogers. General Foster sent a demand for the surrender of the Con should he attempt to rebuild the bridge. General Foster sent forward the Ninth New Jersey regimentth coolness and gallantry. Captain Taylor, of Foster's signal service, reported that the fire from 3 wounded. After this brush with Robertson, Foster moved on toward Goldsboro, his main object bei All the Federal artillery seems, according to Foster's report, to have been engaged at the bridge. [9 more...]
ericksburg. There, seeing the design of the Federal commander, General Lee concentrated his army to await attack. General McClellan had been displaced by the Federal authorities on the 8th of November, and General Burnside appointed to succeed him as commander in the field. The new leader, yielding to public pressure for some success before the year closed, prepared to attack Lee in his chosen position. Burnside had organized his army into three grand divisions, under Sumner, Hooker and Franklin. The first weeks in December, these grand divisions were stretched along the northern bank of the Rappahannock, and were searching for ways to cross over for an attack. On the southern side of the river, Lee's army was posted on the hills and ridges just back of Fredericksburg. His line extended parallel to the river, and stretched from a point just across from Falmouth to Hamilton's crossing, a distance of about three miles. His left was under Longstreet, and his right under Jackson. R
S. D. French (search for this): chapter 9
hose fall on this field of battle ended a brave and noble life, and by the Twenty-fourth North Carolina regiment, Lieut.-Col. J. L. Harris. As the attacks grew warmer, Gen. Robert Ransom, who was specially charged with the keeping of this point, sent in three more North Carolina regiments and a part of a fifth. These fought shoulder to shoulder with Cobb's men. Ransom's brigade supported the twenty guns that so admirably helped to defend these hills. The first Federal attack was made by French's division, followed by Hancock's division. General Couch, who commanded the army corps to which both these divisions belonged, says of their charge in the face of the sheet of flame that came from the stone wall: As they charged, the artillery fire would break their formation and they would get mixed; then they would close up, go forward, receive the withering infantry fire, and those who were able would run to the houses and fight as best they could; and then the next brigade coming u
T. C. Fuller (search for this): chapter 9
nflicted on my command a loss of 3 killed and 19 wounded. This battery, as Colonel Lee calls it, was one gun of Lieut. T. C. Fuller's section of Starr's; the other gun was overturned. Lieutenant Fuller acted with great coolness, and showed a solLieutenant Fuller acted with great coolness, and showed a soldier's aptitude for finding and striking his enemy. General Clingman said of the determined manner in which Fuller fought his solitary gun: Lieutenant Fuller with the greatest gallantry continued to reply until darkness put an end to the contest. Fuller fought his solitary gun: Lieutenant Fuller with the greatest gallantry continued to reply until darkness put an end to the contest. Captain Reinhardt's company of the Third regiment of cavalry is warmly commended in the report of Colonel Stevens. After the afternoon engagement, General Foster withdrew his troops and returned to New Berne. The total Federal losses during this Lieutenant Fuller with the greatest gallantry continued to reply until darkness put an end to the contest. Captain Reinhardt's company of the Third regiment of cavalry is warmly commended in the report of Colonel Stevens. After the afternoon engagement, General Foster withdrew his troops and returned to New Berne. The total Federal losses during this expedition were 591 killed and wounded. Rebellion Records, XVIII, p. 60. The total Confederate loss, as reported by General Smith, was 339. The North Carolina losses, with the exception of the Sixty-first regiment, from which there is no report,
T. D. Galloway (search for this): chapter 9
o the officers and men engaged. On December 10th, Lieut.-Col. John C. Lamb, with some companies from the Seventeenth regiment, a squadron of cavalry under Colonel Evans, and Moore's battery, captured for a time the town of Plymouth, N. C. Colonel Galloway gives the following account of the adventure: The plan was to capture the pickets and take the place by surprise. We reached the picket station just before day, captured all but one, who escaped, firing his musket as he ran. This gave notibel yell. The enemy fired one volley and broke in all directions. Some escaped to the gunboats in skiffs, some hid, some took to the houses and fired from the windows. Quite a lively cannonade ensued between the gunboats and our battery. Captain Galloway and three privates were wounded. Two days before the battle of Fredericksburg, General Foster left New Bern, N. C., with a force of 10,000 infantry, 6 batteries, having in all 40 pieces of artillery, and 640 cavalry. Rebellion Records,
t was hurled back as his predecessors were. General Ransom now moved the rest of his division to the crest, and sent the Twenty-fifth North Carolina to the front line; General Kershaw came up with some of his regiments, and subsequently some of Kemper's were ordered forward. The men in the rear loaded guns, and the ranks interchanged, and in this way an almost continuous fire blazed forth from the line of the stone wall. After Howard, attacks were made by Sturgis' division, supported by Getty's division. Then Griffin made the brave endeavor. Humphreys next essayed to carry the hill by the bayonet, and desperately did he try, but again his men melted as snow. Dead men were lying in such piles in some places that the living could hardly get by, and yet the rash endeavor was kept up. So clearly did those Federals who had stubbornly battled against the position recognize that it was useless to continue such assaults, that General Humphreys says they tried by force to prevent his m
was withdrawn, the right grand division crossed on the pontoon bridges. Burnside ordered Franklin's grand division to attack the position held by Jackson. Reynolds' corps was selected, and he advanced Meade's division, supported on the right by Gibbon's division; and then, when Meade was fired upon on his left, Doubleday's division was advanced to Meade's left. Meade's attack fell first on Lane's brigade of North Carolinians. In the general alignment, Lane's brigade did not join Archer's brirder from corps headquarters, a handsome compliment to these two regiments was read at dress parade. The effort to break through Jackson's lines met a bloody and disastrous repulse. Birney's division was sent to cover the retreat of Meade and Gibbon, and Franklin's grand division, nearly one-half of Burnside's army, did no more considerable fighting on that field. During the ensanguined battle on the Confederate right, Sumner's grand division had been making desperate attempts to carry Ma
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