hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 324 0 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 294 28 Browse Search
Virginia (Virginia, United States) 262 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 210 2 Browse Search
Andersonville, Ga. (Georgia, United States) 177 1 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 162 2 Browse Search
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) 116 0 Browse Search
R. E. Lee 114 0 Browse Search
Georgia (Georgia, United States) 106 0 Browse Search
William T. Sherman 105 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). Search the whole document.

Found 266 total hits in 67 results.

... 2 3 4 5 6 7
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.39
ee, United States Army, be allowed to come to Richmond to drill the Virginia cavalry then encamped ae this time, but I could not have returned to Richmond ere this, for the reason mentioned. I am ws from President Davis are of interest: Richmond, June 7, 1861. Dear Sir — I have the honorcellency John Letcher, Governor of Virginia. Richmond, June 7th, 1861. General John B. Floyd: Deops of other States as well as her own: Richmond, September 20th, 1861. To his Excellency Govehem to me. I am, truly, John Letcher. Richmond, Va., October 9th, 1862. My Dear Governor — les Dimmock, Chief of Ordnance Department, Richmond, Va. Confederate States of America, Treasury Department, Richmond, December 9, 1861. My Dear Sir — With the thanks of Governor Pickens and myseve him. What is then to stand between him and Richmond? I know of no way of ensuring the re-enlistm French will get sick if he remains longer in Richmond, and you would be obliged to give him up then[1 more...
Ohio (United States) (search for this): chapter 6.39
&c., to watch and suppress any out-break. I doubt very much the expediency of Virginia sending any troops to the western border, at least for the present. The appearance of troops at Wheeling, Parkersburg, Point Pleasant, or any places on the Ohio river, would serve to irritate and invite aggression. You could not send enough to do much good, if they chose to invade from the other side. They can concentrate on Wheeling 50,000 men from the other side in twenty-four hours by the various railroads leading to that point; so at Parkersburg, but in less numbers. The Ohio is fordable in the summer and fall at many points, and the whole river, from Sandy to the end of Hancock, easily crossed. We have here, and in all the counties, volunteer companies, home guards, &c. Our mountains are full of rifles, and if invaded, we shall give a good account of ourselves. The question with us is, whether we are not better off, left to ourselves, than to have a small and inadequate force sent to us, w
West Point (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.39
overnor Letcher that Lieutenant-Colonel Hardee, United States Army, be allowed to come to Richmond to drill the Virginia cavalry then encamped at the Fair Grounds, General Scott wrote the following letters. General Hardee complied with the request, and drilled the cavalry several days. New York, October 22, 1860. His Excellency John Letcher, Governor of Virginia: My Dear Sir — I have caused a copy of your letter to be forwarded to Lieutenant-Colonel Hardee, who is, I think, still at West Point, though relieved from duty there. It is not competent for a senior to order a junior of the army on any service whatever, not strictly within the line of his official duties, but I think it probable Colonel Hardee will take pleasure in meeting the wishes of your Excellency. With great respect, I have the honor to remain, Your obedient servant, Winfield Scott. Headquarters of the army, New York, October 22, 186<*>. Lieutenant-Colonel W. J. Hardee, First United States Cavalry:
Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.39
on both sides have taken measures, by committees of safety, &c., to watch and suppress any out-break. I doubt very much the expediency of Virginia sending any troops to the western border, at least for the present. The appearance of troops at Wheeling, Parkersburg, Point Pleasant, or any places on the Ohio river, would serve to irritate and invite aggression. You could not send enough to do much good, if they chose to invade from the other side. They can concentrate on Wheeling 50,000 men frWheeling 50,000 men from the other side in twenty-four hours by the various railroads leading to that point; so at Parkersburg, but in less numbers. The Ohio is fordable in the summer and fall at many points, and the whole river, from Sandy to the end of Hancock, easily crossed. We have here, and in all the counties, volunteer companies, home guards, &c. Our mountains are full of rifles, and if invaded, we shall give a good account of ourselves. The question with us is, whether we are not better off, left to ourse
Wilmington, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 6.39
ehicle of communication of the enclosed resolutions of the Committee of Safety for the town of Wilmington, in which your Excellency will perceive that your kindness to the citizens of Wilmington in thWilmington in their moment of danger is duly and highly appreciated. With the sincere assurance that your Excellency's kindness will always by us be remembered with gratitude, I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Wm. S. Ashe. Wilmington, N. C., September 17th, 1861. At a meeting of the Committee of Safety for the town of Wilmington, the following proceeding was adopted: Wilmington, the following proceeding was adopted: Honorable Wm. S. Ashe having reported that he had procured from Governor Letcher, of Virginia, an eight-inch columbiad and a supply of muskets-- Resolved, That the thanks of this Committee are letter of yesterday, enclosing resolutions adopted by the Committee of Safety for the town of Wilmington, expressive of their thanks for the arms which it was in my power to furnish for their defence
Edmund Turner (search for this): chapter 6.39
ide, as far as possible, for the defence, not only of my own State, but of all the Confederate States, engaged as we are in a common cause for the maintenance of rights and institutions dear to us all. I return to the Committee my acknowledgments for their resolutions, and many thanks to you for the kind terms which you have employed in communicating them to me. I am, truly, John Letcher. Richmond, Va., October 9th, 1862. My Dear Governor — I have the honor to present to you Mr. Edmund Turner, of my staff, and to say that you will place me under the greatest of obligations by delivering to him the order for the arms which you were kind enough to offer me day before yesterday, and by informing him how and where they are to be obtained. Please let me have as many as you can spare. I shall thus be made by you doubly welcome to my new command, and in the use of these arms promise to justify your kindness. I am engaged this evening with a part of my family, who have jus
S. D. Wallace (search for this): chapter 6.39
ured from Governor Letcher, of Virginia, an eight-inch columbiad and a supply of muskets-- Resolved, That the thanks of this Committee are eminently due and are hereby most earnestly tendered to his Excellency John Letcher. Governor of Virginia, for the promptness with which he has responded to the application for arms by this Committee. Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolution be handed to Mr. Ashe, with the request that he will communicate the same to Governor Letcher. S. D. Wallace, Secretary. Richmond, Va., September 21st, 1861. Honorable Wm. S. Ashe: Dear Sir — I have had the honor to receive your letter of yesterday, enclosing resolutions adopted by the Committee of Safety for the town of Wilmington, expressive of their thanks for the arms which it was in my power to furnish for their defence. In the distribution of the arms, &c., at my disposal, it has afforded me pleasure to provide, as far as possible, for the defence, not only of my own State, but of al
... 2 3 4 5 6 7