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D. C. Buell (search for this): chapter 37
have the same effect as a defeat. I replied that if Buell should come up in time the odds would be greatly agaorthy of consideration. We have lost a day. We know Buell is marching an army as large as your own to this poiral Johnston's mind, that he must crush Grant before Buell joined him. This was the purpose, this was the plan places their force west at 200,000. One division of Buell's column arrived yesterday. General Buell will be hGeneral Buell will be here himself to-day. Some skirmishing took place between our out-guards and the enemy's yesterday and the day bk us in ours — mere reconnaissance in force. General Buell says that, so far as preparation for battle is cs the Army, of the Tennessee on the 6th of April. Buell's letter, dated January 19, 1865, to United States sch he believed to be still at Purdy. The advance of Buell's army, Nelson's division, had passed through Savannn the morning of the 6th, and the other divisions of Buell's army followed at intervals of about six miles.
Generals Chalmers (search for this): chapter 37
e — an effective total in the front line of 9,024. Bragg commanded the second line. Withers's division formed his right wing. Jackson's brigade, 2,208 strong, was drawn up three hundred yards in rear of Gladden, its left on the Bark road. Chalmers's brigade was on Jackson's right, en echelon to Gladden's brigade, with its right on a fork of Lick Creek. Clanton's cavalry was in rear of Chalmers's, with pickets to the right and front. In this order the division bivouacked. General BraChalmers's, with pickets to the right and front. In this order the division bivouacked. General Bragg's left wing was made up of three brigades, under General D. Ruggles. Colonel R. L. Gibson commanded the right brigade, resting with his right on the Bark road. Colonel Preston Pond commanded the left brigade, near Owl Creek, with an interval between him and Gibson. About three hundred yards in the rear of these two brigades, opposite the interval, with his right and left flanks masked by Gibson and Pond, Patton Anderson's brigade, 1,634 strong, was posted. Bragg's corps was 10,731 strong,
rps, commanded by Polk, consisted of two divisions, under Cheatham and Clark. Clark's division was ordered to follow Hardee reserve the right wing. Polk's other division, under Cheatham, was on outpost duty, at and near Bethel on the Mobile & rom Mickey's, the point of concentration, as Corinth was. Cheatham's orders were to defend himself if attacked; otherwise, toper military precautions. Acting on these instructions, Cheatham did not advance until the morning of the 5th; but he effeClark's division into line of battle by four o'clock, and Cheatham, who had come up on the left, soon after. Breckinridge'ser causes already assigned-Breckinridge's, Ruggles's, and Cheatham's-General Johnston, followed by his staff, passed from onin infantry and artillery, was composed of two divisions, Cheatham's on the left, made up of B. R. Johnson's and Stephens's road, with intervals of some two miles, in observation of Cheatham's division, which he believed to be still at Purdy. The
s was held motionless by its delay. Having recounted thus far the events of these days, let us recur briefly to General Johnston's personal movements. He left Corinth on the morning of the 4th, and arrived at Monterey at 1 P. M. Soon after, Clanton's Alabama Cavalry brought in some Federal prisoners; and it was manifest from their surprise and their conversation with the staff that the Confederate attack was wholly unexpected. During the afternoon, General Johnston conferred with Braggs right wing. Jackson's brigade, 2,208 strong, was drawn up three hundred yards in rear of Gladden, its left on the Bark road. Chalmers's brigade was on Jackson's right, en echelon to Gladden's brigade, with its right on a fork of Lick Creek. Clanton's cavalry was in rear of Chalmers's, with pickets to the right and front. In this order the division bivouacked. General Bragg's left wing was made up of three brigades, under General D. Ruggles. Colonel R. L. Gibson commanded the right bri
William Clark (search for this): chapter 37
interval. The First Corps, commanded by Polk, consisted of two divisions, under Cheatham and Clark. Clark's division was ordered to follow Hardee on the Ridge road, at an interval of half an houClark's division was ordered to follow Hardee on the Ridge road, at an interval of half an hour, and to halt near Mickey's. This halt was to allow Bragg's corps, whose route from Monterey crossed the Ridge or Bark road at that point, to fall in behind Hardee, at 1,000 yards' interval, and forrp controversy then and afterward as to where the fault lay. Polk's answer was sufficient — that Clark's division was ready to move at 3 A. M. His orders were to wait for the passage of Bragg's corpse or establish his line until this had passed. The road was not clear until 2 P. M.; yet he got Clark's division into line of battle by four o'clock, and Cheatham, who had come up on the left, soon f two divisions, Cheatham's on the left, made up of B. R. Johnson's and Stephens's brigades, and Clark's on his right, formed of A. P. Stewart's and Russell's brigades. It followed Bragg's line at a
P. R. Cleburne (search for this): chapter 37
Sherman's Memoirs, vol. i., p. 235. A Federal reconnaissance had been sent out under Colonel Buckland, and encountered Cleburne's brigade of Hardee's corps, but retired without ascertaining anything important, or surmising that General Johnston's aRegiment, of which he has furnished a valuable memoir to the writer, gives the following statement. His regiment was in Cleburne's brigade, and on the extreme left of Hardee's line. He says: The wishes of General Johnston to move quietly wereHardee's corps, moving on the Ridge road under its methodical commander, assisted by the ardor and energy of Hindman and Cleburne, moved with greater celerity than the other troops. But something of this was due to their apprenticeship in war, underGladden's brigade, was under Hardee, and extended from Owl Creek to Lick Creek, a distance of somewhat over three miles. Cleburne's brigade was on the left, with its flank resting near Owl Creek. Hindman was intrusted with a division, composed of Wo
the deadly struggle, and nerve themselves to meet it. But in this case the nearness of the enemy in force was not known in the national army, and there was no special preparation for the conflict. In Sherman and his campaigns, by Colonels Bowman and Irwin, it is stated (page 50), There was nothing to indicate a general attack until seven o'clock on Sunday morning, when the advance-guard of Sherman's front was forced in on his main line. Grant and his campaigns, a book compiled by Prof. Coppee, avowedly from Grant's Reports, and very prejudiced in its conclusions in favor of that general, says, At the outset our troops were shamefully surprised and easily overpowered. It is but a poor compliment to the generalship of either Grant or Sherman to believe them aware of the presence of the Confederate army in their front on the 5th. Else why was General Lew Wallace with 7,500 men kept at Crump's Landing, and Nelson and Crittenden's divisions-14,000 men-left at Savannah? Why the
George B. Crittenden (search for this): chapter 37
ut a poor compliment to the generalship of either Grant or Sherman to believe them aware of the presence of the Confederate army in their front on the 5th. Else why was General Lew Wallace with 7,500 men kept at Crump's Landing, and Nelson and Crittenden's divisions-14,000 men-left at Savannah? Why the calm of Saturday and the confusion of Sunday? For the events of the battle, let the eulogists of Generals Grant and Sherman rather plead, than deny, the surprise that befell them on Sunday mornam's division, which he believed to be still at Purdy. The advance of Buell's army, Nelson's division, had passed through Savannah on Saturday morning, April 5th, and was distant from Pittsburg about five miles on the north bank of the river. Crittenden's division arrived there on the morning of the 6th, and the other divisions of Buell's army followed at intervals of about six miles. The arrangement of Grant's army at Shiloh has been subjected to very severe and probably just criticism, b
Daniel S. Donelson (search for this): chapter 37
that heralded across the Aegean the victory of Plataea to the combatants of Mycale. Known facts, inference and imagination, often construct in an army an hypothesis not to be neglected. Possibly upon some such basis General Prentiss acted in throwing to the front ten companies, under Colonel Moore, to watch the approaches to his position. But it is perfectly evident that Grant and Sherman considered themselves above such idle fears. The vulgar apprehension did not touch the victor of Donelson. It never reached either Grant or Sherman. Indeed, the latter, with bitter innuendo, points to it as proof of cowardice in certain officers with whom he was at variance. He swears in his evidence on Worthington's trial. Sherman's historical raid, by Boynton, p. 29. Therefore, on Friday, two days before the battle, when Colonel Worthington was so apprehensive, I knew there was no hostile party in six miles, Hardee was not more than two miles distant. though there was reason to e
E. L. Drake (search for this): chapter 37
r arms, to be ready to advance. There they stood, anxious to go forward; but it was impossible to move in the pitch-darkness, over flooded roads and swollen streams, with the cold, driving rain beating upon them. With almost criminal recklessness, many of the soldiers discharged their small-arms, to find out the condition of the cartridges. General Johnston, as he rode along the lines on the 5th, tried to prevent the recurrence of this. Bragg alludes to it with great severity. Colonel E. L. Drake, of Fayetteville, Tennessee, who was at that time serving in Bate's Second Tennessee Regiment, of which he has furnished a valuable memoir to the writer, gives the following statement. His regiment was in Cleburne's brigade, and on the extreme left of Hardee's line. He says: The wishes of General Johnston to move quietly were not generally regarded; and, at one point on the march, the presence of a wild deer, which ran along the lines, evoked a yell among Hardee's men which co
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