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Nathan Bedford Forrest (search for this): chapter 37
account is as follows, and is presumably to be received as General Beauregard's own statement of the matter. Life of Forrest, p. 113. Mentioning in a note that it occurred about four o'clock in the open air, on foot, in the road, between the genll, and from the rough and wooded character of the ground, they did little service that day. The part taken by Morgan's, Forrest's, and Wharton's (Eighth Texas), will be given in its proper place. The army, exclusive of its cavalry, was between e writer, then on inspection-duty, gave the effective total of all arms at 38,773, who marched April 3d. In his Life of Forrest he makes it 39,630. Hodge, in his sketch of the First Kentucky Brigade, with a different distribution of troops, puts t There are apparently some errors in the return of July, 1862. The writer believes that the figures in Jordan's Life of Forrest approach the truth most nearly. It now behooves us to consider the employment of the Federal army during those fate
R. L. Gibson (search for this): chapter 37
was made up of three brigades, under General D. Ruggles. Colonel R. L. Gibson commanded the right brigade, resting with his right on the Bark road. Colonel Preston Pond commanded the left brigade, near Owl Creek, with an interval between him and Gibson. About three hundred yards in the rear of these two brigades, opposite the interval, with his right and left flanks masked by Gibson and Pond, Patton Anderson's brigade, 1,634 strong, was posted. Bragg's corps was 10,731 strong, and was drawn uGibson and Pond, Patton Anderson's brigade, 1,634 strong, was posted. Bragg's corps was 10,731 strong, and was drawn up in line of battle, or with the regiments in double column at half distance, according to the nature of the ground. The third line or reserve was composed of the First Corps, under Polk, and three brigades under Breckinridge. Polk's command was massed in columns of brigades on the Bark road, near Mickey's; and Breckinridge's on the road from Monterey toward the same point. Polk was to advance on the left of the Bark road, at an interval of about eight hundred paces from Bragg's line; and
Randal L. Gibson (search for this): chapter 37
line. Withers's division formed his right wing. Jackson's brigade, 2,208 strong, was drawn up three hundred yards in rear of Gladden, its left on the Bark road. Chalmers's brigade was on Jackson's right, en echelon to Gladden's brigade, with its right on a fork of Lick Creek. Clanton's cavalry was in rear of Chalmers's, with pickets to the right and front. In this order the division bivouacked. General Bragg's left wing was made up of three brigades, under General D. Ruggles. Colonel R. L. Gibson commanded the right brigade, resting with his right on the Bark road. Colonel Preston Pond commanded the left brigade, near Owl Creek, with an interval between him and Gibson. About three hundred yards in the rear of these two brigades, opposite the interval, with his right and left flanks masked by Gibson and Pond, Patton Anderson's brigade, 1,634 strong, was posted. Bragg's corps was 10,731 strong, and was drawn up in line of battle, or with the regiments in double column at half
Jeremy F. Gilmer (search for this): chapter 37
short distance by a number of staff officials, and was of short duration, he names Generals Johnston, Beauregard, Polk, Bragg, Hardee (Hardee was not present, but Gilmer was), and Breckinridge, as taking part in it, and then furnishes this narrative: At least one division, if not the whole of Bragg's corps, was likewise inexed that some of the regiments had not brought provisions sufficient. A conference was held between Generals Johnston, Beauregard, Bragg, and Polk, at 5 P. M.; Major Gilmer being near. Some thought the long delay in the movement, of thirty-six hours, would put the enemy on the alert, and the want of provisions would endanger a fato attack early, and General Johnston determined to lead the attack in person, and leave General Beauregard to direct the movements of troops in the rear. General Gilmer says that Beauregard's proposition to retire without making an attack was not opposed, so far as he can remember. He adds: General Johnston appeared mu
e's corps not being sufficiently strong, it had been provided that Gladden's brigade, of Bragg's corps, should occupy his right. This line ey, and before seven o'clock his column was also put in motion; and Gladden's and Withers's other brigades were placed in line of battle, in dConfederate array: The front line, composed of the Third Corps and Gladden's brigade, was under Hardee, and extended from Owl Creek to Lick Centre. The interval, on his right, to Lick Creek, was occupied by Gladden's brigade, detached from Bragg, and put under Hardee's command forhe battle. Hardee's three brigades numbered 6,789 effectives, and Gladden added 2,235 more — an effective total in the front line of 9,024. brigade, 2,208 strong, was drawn up three hundred yards in rear of Gladden, its left on the Bark road. Chalmers's brigade was on Jackson's right, en echelon to Gladden's brigade, with its right on a fork of Lick Creek. Clanton's cavalry was in rear of Chalmers's, with pickets to
U. S. Grant (search for this): chapter 37
ch, if this order could have been carried out, Grant and his army would have been destroyed. But mnd by the special confidence reposed in him by Grant, he shared with his chief the responsibility f the Confederate cavalry. In his letter to Grant, dated April 5th (page 235), Sherman reports tery on Sunday morning. In Badeau's Life of Grant (page 600) occurs the following correspondence take place. General Sherman's dispatch to Grant, sent with the above to Halleck, is as followsowledge of the Confederate movement in force. Grant and Sherman evidently expected some skirmishinposition. But it is perfectly evident that Grant and Sherman considered themselves above such ie victor of Donelson. It never reached either Grant or Sherman. Indeed, the latter, with bitter ia book compiled by Prof. Coppee, avowedly from Grant's Reports, and very prejudiced in its conclusievents of the battle, let the eulogists of Generals Grant and Sherman rather plead, than deny, the s[14 more...]
H. W. Halleck (search for this): chapter 37
f Grant (page 600) occurs the following correspondence. The first communication is a telegram from General Grant to General Halleck, his commanding officer: Savannah, April 5, 1862. The main force of the enemy is at Corinth, with troops at difftook place between our out-guards and the enemy's yesterday and the day before. U. S. Grant, Major-General. Major-General H. W. Halleck, St. Louis, Missouri. In a subsequent dispatch to Halleck, on the same day, he says that he had received notHalleck, on the same day, he says that he had received notes, stating that our outposts had been attacked by the enemy, apparently in considerable force. I immediately went up, but found all quiet. . . . They had with them three pieces of artillery, and cavalry and infantry. How much, cannot of course beus, but will be prepared should such a thing take place. General Sherman's dispatch to Grant, sent with the above to Halleck, is as follows: Pittsburg Landing, April 5, 1862. sir: All is quiet along my lines now. We are in the act of exchang
William Joseph Hardee (search for this): chapter 37
— for time was precious — the movement began. Hardee led the advance, the Third Corps, that afternoivouacked that night near Mickey's, in rear of Hardee's corps, with a proper interval. The FirstCleburne's brigade, and on the extreme left of Hardee's line. He says: The wishes of General Bragg to move his command. Before ten o'clock Hardee's corps had reached the outposts, and developed. General Johnston meanwhile rode forward to Hardee's line, where some slight skirmishing seemed trived on the field a little after six o'clock. Hardee's line was already formed, and the general-in-es Generals Johnston, Beauregard, Polk, Bragg, Hardee (Hardee was not present, but Gilmer was), and nd put under Hardee's command for the battle. Hardee's three brigades numbered 6,789 effectives, an Shiloh Church and Mickey's, in front of which Hardee's corps was deploying. Indeed, Colonel Bucklaew there was no hostile party in six miles, Hardee was not more than two miles distant. though th[17 more...]<
Isham G. Harris (search for this): chapter 37
n then ordered the attack for next morning, and we bivouacked in silence for tho night. General Preston informs the writer that General Johnston said little, but closed the discussion with great decision of manner. As he moved off, he said to Preston: I would fight them if they were a million. They can present no greater front between these two creeks than we can; and the more men they crowd in there, the worse we can make it for them. . . . Polk is a true soldier and a friend. Governor Harris mentions the following incident, which is significant of General Johnston's train of thought during that day, and confirmatory of the above: I was riding with him along the line of battle, which was being formed about 12 M. Colonel Munford thinks the hour was earlier. on Saturday, when one of our scouts intercepted us, and made a report to the general which indicated the presence of a much larger Federal force than previous information had induced us to expect. For a moment af
D. M. Hayden (search for this): chapter 37
Generals Johnston and Bragg in consultation. He hoped, then, to be up in time, and received orders to join in the attack next morning. At midnight he sent a dispatch, saying his artillery was stuck in the mud, and had stopped his train. Major Hayden says General Johnston sent him word, Cut a new road for your column. It did not, however, effect its junction with the other corps until late Saturday afternoon, the 5th, owing to the rains on Friday and Saturday, the storm of Friday night, ay the storm, the mire, and the other causes already assigned-Breckinridge's, Ruggles's, and Cheatham's-General Johnston, followed by his staff, passed from one body of troops to another, encouraging the men both by his words and his presence. Major Hayden, his volunteer aide, says: When they began to cheer his approach, he checked them, because it would call the attention of the enemy to their position. His advice to the men was brief and characteristic. He told them, Look along your gu
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