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North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
rate States army. The State would be lost, and North Carolina and Tennessee would have an inevitable avalanchsion of conscription in the eastern counties of North Carolina the other day. This paper was referred by the Sby the President to Gen. B. (who is a native of North Carolina), and, seeing what was desired, Gen. B. recommed his mind since the reception of the news from North Carolina, and has determined that all the government shaes we may derive considerable supplies from Eastern North Carolina. So do I. Gov. Watts writes to the Secr We are also looking to hear more news from North Carolina; and Newbern will probably be stormed next, sineport was a great one. Nothing additional from North Carolina, though something further must soon occur theren. Perhaps Burnside may hurl his blows against North Carolina. Food is still advancing in price; and unleThus in Louisiana, Florida, West Tennessee, and North Carolina the enemy have sustained severe defeats: their
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
f the writ of habeas corpus. During the day the article was sent to Mr. Secretary Seddon, with the compliments of Mr. Parker--the author, I suppose. April 28 After a slight shower last night, a cool, clear morning. The ominous silence or pause between the armies continues. Lieut.-Gen. Longstreet, it is said, is hidden. I suppose he is working his way around the enemy's right flank. If so, we shall soon hear thunder. It is also supposed that Lee meditates an incursion into Pennsylvania, and that Gen. Beauregard will protect his rear and cover this city. All is merely conjecture. We are amused at the enemy's accounts of the storming of Plymouth. Their papers pretend to have not heard the result, and would lead their readers to believe that Gen. Hoke was repulsed, and that the place is impregnable. The following appears in the morning papers: Gen. Lee's bill of fare. The Richmond correspondent of the Mobile Advertiser gives the following about Gen. Lee
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
s put the city in as good spirits as possible. But the excitement from Hoke's victory was supplanted by an excitement of another kind. A report was circulated and believed that the President resolved yesterday to remove the government to South Carolina or Alabama; and the commotion was very great. The President's salary is insufficient to meet his housekeeping expenditures; and Mrs. D. has become, very naturally, somewhat indignant at the conduct of the extortioners, and, of course, the Pred 24-pounders. To-day Mr. Memminger, in behalf of the ladies in his department, presented a battle-flag to the Department Battalion for its gallant conduct in the repulse of Dahlgren's raid. But the ladies leave early in the morning for South Carolina. The President still says that many of the government officers and employees must be sent away, if transportation cannot be had to feed them here as well as the armies. April 26 Another truly fine spring day. The ominous silence
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
remain citizens of the United States, if permitted, without further molestation on the part of the Federal authorities, and many Virginians in the field might abandon the Confederate States army. The State would be lost, and North Carolina and Tennessee would have an inevitable avalanche of invasion precipitated upon them. The only hope would be civil war in the North, a not improbable event. What could they do with four millions of negroes arrogating equality with the whites? April 4 uld have been abundance of grain in the army depots of Virginia. April 30 Federal papers now admit that Gen. Banks has been disastrously beaten in Louisiana. They also admit their calamity at Plymouth, N. C. Thus in Louisiana, Florida, West Tennessee, and North Carolina the enemy have sustained severe defeats: their losses amounting to some 20,000 men, 100 guns, half a dozen war steamers, etc. etc. Gen. Burnside has left Annapolis and gone to Grant-whatever the plan was originally; an
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 38
ndoning the city. That would be abandonment of the cause. Nearly all who own no slaves would remain citizens of the United States, if permitted, without further molestation on the part of the Federal authorities, and many Virginians in the field might abandon the Confederate States army. The State would be lost, and North Carolina and Tennessee would have an inevitable avalanche of invasion precipitated upon them. The only hope would be civil war in the North, a not improbable event. What ren of the soldiers,a fearful risk But, alas! how are our brave men faring in the hands of the demon fanatics in the United States? It is said they are dying like sheep. April 7 A bright spring day. We look for startling news from the Ra Major Griswold has resigned, at last. He did not find his position a bed of roses. I believe he abandons the Confederate States service altogether, and will attend to the collection of claims, and the defense of prisoners, probably arrested by
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
then this famine would not have been upon us, and there would have been abundance of grain in the army depots of Virginia. April 30 Federal papers now admit that Gen. Banks has been disastrously beaten in Louisiana. They also admit their calamity at Plymouth, N. C. Thus in Louisiana, Florida, West Tennessee, and North Carolina the enemy have sustained severe defeats: their losses amounting to some 20,000 men, 100 guns, half a dozen war steamers, etc. etc. Gen. Burnside has left Annapolis and gone to Grant-whatever the plan was originally; and the work of concentration goes on for a decisive clash of arms in Virginia. And troops are coming hither from all quarters, like streamlets flowing into the ocean. Our men are confident, and eager for the fray. The railroad companies say they can transport 10,000 bushels corn, daily, into Virginia. That will subsist 200,000 men and 25,000 horses. And in June the Piedmont connection will be completed. The great battle ma
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
A short time since, it was said, Johnston was prevented from advancing for want of rations. April 25 A bright and beautiful day; southern breezes. No reliable war news; but there are rumors that our victory at Shreveport was a great one. Nothing additional from North Carolina, though something further must soon occur there. It is said the enemy's killed and wounded at Plymouth amounted to only 100: ours 300; but we got 2500 prisoners. President Lincoln has made a speech at Baltimore, threatening retaliation for the slaughter at Fort Pillow--which was stormed. Lieut.-Gen. Polk telegraphs that our forces have captured and burnt one of the enemy's gun-boats at Yazoo City-first taking out her guns, eight rifled 24-pounders. To-day Mr. Memminger, in behalf of the ladies in his department, presented a battle-flag to the Department Battalion for its gallant conduct in the repulse of Dahlgren's raid. But the ladies leave early in the morning for South Carolina. T
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
t. Potatoes sell at $1 per quart; chickens, $35 per pair; turnip greens, $4 per peckI An ounce of meat, daily, is the allowance to each member of my family, the cat and parrot included. The pigeons of my neighbor have disappeared. Every day we have accounts of robberies, the preceding night, of cows, pigs, bacon, flour — and even the setting hens are taken from their nests! April 12 Cloudy — rained in the afternoon. This is the anniversary of the first gun of the war, fired at Fort Sumter. It is still said and believed that Gen. Lee will take the initiative, and attack Grant. The following shows that we have had another success: Mobile, April 11th, 1864. To Gen. S. Cooper, A. & I. General. The following report was received at Baton Rouge, on the 3d inst., from the Surgeon-General of Banks's army: We met the enemy near Shreveport. Union force repulsed with great loss. How many can you accommodate in hospitals at Baton Rouge? Steamer Essex, or Benton, destroyed
Charlottesville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
ed. There is an unofficial report that one of our torpedo boats struck the Federal war steamer Minnesota yesterday, near Newport News, and damaged her badly. I learn (from an official source) to-day that Gen. Longstreet's corps is at Charlottesville, to co-operate with Lee's army, which will soon move, no doubt. Gen. Bragg received a dispatch yesterday, requesting that commissary stores for Longstreet be sent to Charlottesville, and he ordered his military secretary to direct the CoCharlottesville, and he ordered his military secretary to direct the Commissary-General accordingly. To this Col. Northrop, C. G. S., took exceptions, and returned the paper, calling the attention of Gen. B.'s secretary to the Rules and Regulations, involving a matter of red tape etiquette. The C. G. S. can only be ordered or directed by the Secretary of War. Gen. B. sent the paper to the Secretary, with the remark that if he is to be restricted, etc., his usefulness must be necessarily diminished. The Secretary sent for Col. N., and I suppose pacified him.
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
Xxxvii. April, 1864 Return of Mr. Ould and Capt. Hatch from Fortress Monroe. quarrel between Mr. Memminger and Mr. Seddon. famine. a victory in Louisiana. Vice-President Stephens's speech. victory of Gen. Forrest. capture of Plymouth, N. C. Gen. Lee's bill of fare. April 1 Cloudy all day, with occasional li cold rain all day; wind from northwest. Mr. Ould and Capt. Hatch, agents of exchange (of prisoners), have returned from a conference with Gen. Butler, at Fortress Monroe, and it is announced that arrangements have been made for an immediate resumption of the exchange of prisoners on the old footing. Thus has the government abo use it — if there be a military necessity. Who knows but that one or more members of Mr. Lincoln's cabinet, or his generals, might be purchased with gold? Fortress Monroe would be cheap at that price! April 29 A letter from Major-Gen. Hoke, dated Plymouth, April 25th, and asking the appointment of Lieut.-Col. Dearing to a
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