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York (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 38
orner of the table, and has lately acquired a fondness for meat. The old cat goes staggering about from debility, although Fannie often gives him her share. We see neither rats nor mice about the premises now. This is famine. Even the pigeons watch the crusts in the hands of the children, and follow them in the yard. And, still, there are no beggars. The plum-tree in my neighbor's garden is in blossom to-day, and I see a few blossoms on our cherry-trees. I have set out some 130 early York cabbage-plants-very small; and to-day planted lima and snap beans. I hope we shall have no more cold weather, for garden seed, if those planted failed to come up, would cost more than the crops in ordinary times. April 9 Rained all day. Lieut. Tyler, grandson of President Tyler, is here on furlough, which expires to-morrow. His father (the major), whom he has not seen for two years, he learns, will be in the city day after tomorrow; and to-day he sought admittance to Mr. Secretary
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): chapter 38
ts that Gen. Longstreet's impressing officers are taking all, except five bushels of grain and fifty pounds of bacon for each adult — a plenty, one would think, under the circumstances. Senator Hunter has asked and obtained a detail for Mr. Daudridge (under eighteen) as quartermaster's clerk. And Mr. Secretary Seddon has ordered the commissary to let Mrs. Michie have sugar and flour for her family, white and black. Mr. Secretary Benjamin sent over, to-day, for passports to the Mississippi River for two secret agents. What for? Gen. Lee has made regulations to prevent cotton, tobacco, etc. passing his lines into the enemy's country, unless allowed by the government. But, then, several in authority will allow it without limit. I set out sixty-eight early cabbage-plants yesterday. They are now under the snow! April 3 The snow has disappeared; but it is cloudy, with a cold northwest wind. The James River is very high, and all the streams are so much swollen that
Robert Toombs (search for this): chapter 38
retary of War. The French ships have gone down the river, without taking much tobacco; said to have been ordered away by the United States Government. Col. W. M. Browne (the President's English A. D.C.), it is said, goes to Georgia as commandant of conscripts for that State. It is probable he offended some one of the President's family, domestic or military. The people had long been offended by his presence and arrogance. The Enquirer, to-day, has a communication assaulting Messrs. Toombs and Stephens, and impeaching their loyalty. The writer denounced the Vice-President severely for his opposition to the suspension of the writ of habeas corpus. During the day the article was sent to Mr. Secretary Seddon, with the compliments of Mr. Parker--the author, I suppose. April 28 After a slight shower last night, a cool, clear morning. The ominous silence or pause between the armies continues. Lieut.-Gen. Longstreet, it is said, is hidden. I suppose he is working hi
Robert Tyler (search for this): chapter 38
no more cold weather, for garden seed, if those planted failed to come up, would cost more than the crops in ordinary times. April 9 Rained all day. Lieut. Tyler, grandson of President Tyler, is here on furlough, which expires to-morrow. His father (the major), whom he has not seen for two years, he learns, will be in President Tyler, is here on furlough, which expires to-morrow. His father (the major), whom he has not seen for two years, he learns, will be in the city day after tomorrow; and to-day he sought admittance to Mr. Secretary Seddon to obtain a prolongation of his furlough, so as to enable him to remain two days and see his parent. But Mr. Kean refused him admittance, and referred him to the Adjutant-General, who was sick and absent; and thus red tape exhibits its insensibility to the dictates of humanity, even when no advantage is gained by it. Robert Tyler subsequently addressed a note to Mr. K., the purport of which I did not inquire. We have no war news-indeed, no newspapers to-day. The wet weather, however, may be in our favor, as it will give us time to concentrate in Virginia. Better give
Z. B. Vance (search for this): chapter 38
indorsed a reference to the Secretary of War, requiring his opinion in writing, etc. Since then, the President and cabinet have been in consultation, and we shall probably know the result to-morrow. If the departments are sent South, it will cause a prodigious outburst from the press here, and may have a bad, blundering effect on the army in Virginia, composed mostly of Virginians; and Gen. Bragg will have to bear the brunt of it, although the government will be solely responsible. Gov. Vance recommended the suspension of conscription in the eastern counties of North Carolina the other day. This paper was referred by the Secretary to the President, by the President to Gen. B. (who is a native of North Carolina), and, seeing what was desired, Gen. B. recommended that the conscription be proceeded with. This may cause Gov. V. to be defeated at the election, and Gen. B. will be roundly abused. He will be unpopular still. April 22 A bright day and warmer. Cherry-trees in
Virginians (search for this): chapter 38
ng the purpose of abandoning the city. That would be abandonment of the cause. Nearly all who own no slaves would remain citizens of the United States, if permitted, without further molestation on the part of the Federal authorities, and many Virginians in the field might abandon the Confederate States army. The State would be lost, and North Carolina and Tennessee would have an inevitable avalanche of invasion precipitated upon them. The only hope would be civil war in the North, a not impr in consultation, and we shall probably know the result to-morrow. If the departments are sent South, it will cause a prodigious outburst from the press here, and may have a bad, blundering effect on the army in Virginia, composed mostly of Virginians; and Gen. Bragg will have to bear the brunt of it, although the government will be solely responsible. Gov. Vance recommended the suspension of conscription in the eastern counties of North Carolina the other day. This paper was referred by
Jackson Warner (search for this): chapter 38
ned, at last. He did not find his position a bed of roses. I believe he abandons the Confederate States service altogether, and will attend to the collection of claims, and the defense of prisoners, probably arrested by Major Carrington, his successor in office. To-day I saw two conscripts from Western Virginia conducted to the cars (going to Lee's army) in chains. It made a chill shoot through my breast. I doubt its policy, though they may be peculiar offenders. The benevolent Capt. Warner, being persecuted by the Commissary-General for telling the truth in regard to the rations, etc., is settling his accounts as rapidly as possible, and will resign his office. He says he will resume his old business, publishing books, etc. April 11 Rained all night, but clear most of the day. There are rumors of Burnside landing troops on the Peninsula; also of preparations for movements on the Rappahannock-by which side is uncertain. It is said troops are coming from Mississip
T. H. Watts (search for this): chapter 38
tillery. R. F. Hoke, Brig.-General. The President has changed his mind since the reception of the news from North Carolina, and has determined that all the government shall not leave Richmond until further orders. All that can be spared will go, however, at once. The War and Navy Departments will remain for the present. The news is said to have had a wonderful effect on the President's mind; and he hopes we may derive considerable supplies from Eastern North Carolina. So do I. Gov. Watts writes to the Secretary that commissary agents, who ought to be in the ranks, are making unnecessary impressments, leaving to each negro only four ounces of bacon per day. He says the government has already some 10,000,000 pounds of bacon in Alabama; and that if the other States, east of the Mississippi, furnish a proportional amount, there will be 60,000,000 pounds-enough to feed our armies twelve months. The Commissary-General's estimates for the next six months are for 400,000 men.
in the field? I think he must fight; and I am sure he will be beaten, for Lee's strength is probably underestimated. We are also looking to hear more news from North Carolina; and Newbern will probably be stormed next, since storming is now the order of the day. April 24 Cloudy and windy, but warm. We have none of the details yet of the storming of Plymouth, except the brief dispatches in the newspapers; nor any reliable accounts of subsequent movements. But a letter from Gen. Whiting indicates that all his troops had been taken northward, and we may expect something further of interest. It is still believed that Lee's and Grant's armies are in motion on the Rappahannock; but whether going North or coming South, no one seems to know. Our people unanimously look for a victory. I bought a black coat at auction yesterday (short swallow-tailed) for $12. It is fine cloth, not much worn-its owner going into the army, probably-but out of fashion. If it had been a fro
J. H. Winder (search for this): chapter 38
the government officers and employees must be sent away, if transportation cannot be had to feed them here as well as the armies. April 26 Another truly fine spring day. The ominous silence on the Rapidan and Rappahannock continues still. The two armies seem to be measuring each other's strength before the awful conflict begins. It is said the enemy are landing large bodies of troops at Yorktown. Major-Gen. Ransom has been assigned to the command of this department; and Gen. Winder's expectations of promotion are blasted. Will he resign? I think not. The enemy's accounts of the battle on the Red River do not agree with the reports we have. Neither do the Federal accounts of the storming of Fort Pillow agree with ours. April 27 Another bright and beautiful day; and vegetation is springing with great rapidity. But nearly all my potatoes, corn, egg-plants, and tomatoes seem to have been killed by the frosts of March. I am replanting corn, lima beans,
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