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here are rumors of the enemy accumulating a heavy force at Suffolk. The guard at Camp Lee are going in the morning to Lee's army; their places here to be filled by the reserve forces of boys and old men. This indicates a battle on the Rapidan. April 16 Rained all night% and in fitful showers all day. We have more accounts (unofficial) of a victory near Shreveport, La. One of the enemy's gun-boats has been blown up and sunk in Florida. By late Northern arrivals we see that a Mr. Long, member of Congress, has spoken in favor of our recognition. A resolution of expulsion was soon after introduced. Gen. Lee has suggested, and the Secretary of War has approved, a project for removing a portion of the population from Richmond into the country. Its object is to accumulate supplies for the army. If some 20,000 could be moved away, it would relieve the rest to some extent. Troops are passing northward every night. The carnage and carnival of death will soon begin!
Longstreet (search for this): chapter 38
or want of attention. From Washington County there are complaints that Gen. Longstreet's impressing officers are taking all, except five bushels of grain and fifing day. We look for startling news from the Rappahannock in a few days. Longstreet will be there. Gen. Lee writes that the fortifications around Richmond ou, and damaged her badly. I learn (from an official source) to-day that Gen. Longstreet's corps is at Charlottesville, to co-operate with Lee's army, which will sn. Bragg received a dispatch yesterday, requesting that commissary stores for Longstreet be sent to Charlottesville, and he ordered his military secretary to direct t but we are on the tip-toe of expectation of exciting news from the Rapidan. Longstreet is certainly in communication with Lee; and if the enemy be not present withorning. The ominous silence or pause between the armies continues. Lieut.-Gen. Longstreet, it is said, is hidden. I suppose he is working his way around the ene
Ben McCulloch (search for this): chapter 38
n and high prices, than apprehension of the city being taken by the enemy. April 20 A clear morning, but a cold, cloudy day. The following dispatch from Gen. Forrest shows that the bloody work has commenced in earnest: Demopolis, Ala., April 19th. to Gen. S. Cooper. The following dispatch has just been received from Gen. Forrest, dated Jackson, Tenn., April 15th. L. Polk, Lieut.-General. I attacked Fort Pillow on the morning of the 12th inst., with a part of Bell's and McCulloch's brigades, numbering--, under Brig.-Gen. J. R. Chalmers. After a short fight we drove the enemy, seven hundred strong, into the fort, under cover of their gun-boats, and demanded a surrender, which was declined by Major L. W. Booth, commanding United States forces. I stormed the fort, and after a contest of thirty minutes captured the entire garrison, killing 500 and taking 100 prisoners, and a large amount of quartermaster stores. The officers in the fort were killed, including Major
Mr. Ould and Capt. Hatch from Fortress Monroe. quarrel between Mr. Memminger and Mr. Seddon. famine. a victory in Louisiana. Vice-Presidethe Secretary of War for a similar detail, but it was refused. Mr. Memminger appealed, with some acerbity, to the President, and the Presidehe Camp of Instruction, if the detail were not renewed. To-day Mr. Memminger addresses a note to Mr. Seddon, inquiring if it was his purposnd it is the boldest tyranny to enroll them as conscripts. But Mr. Memminger has no scruples on that head. All of them desire to retain in I think, to a speedy humiliation. I saw a note to-day from Mr. Memminger stating his fears that the amount of Treasury notes funded willfirst taking out her guns, eight rifled 24-pounders. To-day Mr. Memminger, in behalf of the ladies in his department, presented a battle-nce between the Secretaries of the Treasury and War, I saw that Mr. Memminger has about a million and a quarter in coin at Macon, Ga., seized
ty, Va., states that government bacon (tithe) is spoiling, in bulk, for want of attention. From Washington County there are complaints that Gen. Longstreet's impressing officers are taking all, except five bushels of grain and fifty pounds of bacon for each adult — a plenty, one would think, under the circumstances. Senator Hunter has asked and obtained a detail for Mr. Daudridge (under eighteen) as quartermaster's clerk. And Mr. Secretary Seddon has ordered the commissary to let Mrs. Michie have sugar and flour for her family, white and black. Mr. Secretary Benjamin sent over, to-day, for passports to the Mississippi River for two secret agents. What for? Gen. Lee has made regulations to prevent cotton, tobacco, etc. passing his lines into the enemy's country, unless allowed by the government. But, then, several in authority will allow it without limit. I set out sixty-eight early cabbage-plants yesterday. They are now under the snow! April 3 The snow ha
Augustus S. Montgomery (search for this): chapter 38
a contest of thirty minutes captured the entire garrison, killing 500 and taking 100 prisoners, and a large amount of quartermaster stores. The officers in the fort were killed, including Major Booth. I sustained a loss of 20 killed and 60 wounded. The Confederate flag now floats over the fort. (Signed) N. B. Forrest, Major-General. There is a rumor that Grant's army is falling back toward Centreville. It is supposed by many that all the departments will follow the Auditor to Montgomery soon. April 21 Bright sunshine all day, but cool. Gen. Bragg received a dispatch to day from Gen. Hoke, of Plymouth, N. C., stating that he had (yesterday) stormed Plymouth, taking 1600 prisoners, 25 cannon, stores, etc. etc. This put the city in as good spirits as possible. But the excitement from Hoke's victory was supplanted by an excitement of another kind. A report was circulated and believed that the President resolved yesterday to remove the government to South Caro
L. B. Northrop (search for this): chapter 38
and he ordered his military secretary to direct the Commissary-General accordingly. To this Col. Northrop, C. G. S., took exceptions, and returned the paper, calling the attention of Gen. B.'s secrecessary suppression of the Southern (Yankee) Express Company. This elicited the approval of Col. Northrop, the Commissary-General, who spoke to me on the subject. He told me the Express Company had$40-such is the deplorable condition of the railroads, or rather of the management of them. Col. Northrop, Commissary-General, said to-day that Gen. Lee and the Secretary of War were responsible forir. The President returned the paper to day, relating to the matter of etiquette between Col. Northrop and Gen. Bragg's military secretary. The President says that Gen. B. certainly has the righ of meal here (which the miller, Crenshaw, sold to the people) to be taken for the army; but Col. Northrop, Commissary-General, opposes this; and it is to be hoped, as usual, he may have his way, in
Robert Ould (search for this): chapter 38
Xxxvii. April, 1864 Return of Mr. Ould and Capt. Hatch from Fortress Monroe. quarrel between Mr. Memminger and Mr. Seddon. famine. a victory in Louisiana. Vice-President Stephens's speech. victory of Gen. Forrest. capture of Plymouth, N. C. Gen. Lee's bill of fare. April 1 Cloudy all day, with occasional light showers. No war news; but the papers have an account of the shooting of an infant by some Yankees on account of its name. This shows that the war is degeneration precipitated upon them. The only hope would be civil war in the North, a not improbable event. What could they do with four millions of negroes arrogating equality with the whites? April 4 A cold rain all day; wind from northwest. Mr. Ould and Capt. Hatch, agents of exchange (of prisoners), have returned from a conference with Gen. Butler, at Fortress Monroe, and it is announced that arrangements have been made for an immediate resumption of the exchange of prisoners on the old fo
scripts for that State. It is probable he offended some one of the President's family, domestic or military. The people had long been offended by his presence and arrogance. The Enquirer, to-day, has a communication assaulting Messrs. Toombs and Stephens, and impeaching their loyalty. The writer denounced the Vice-President severely for his opposition to the suspension of the writ of habeas corpus. During the day the article was sent to Mr. Secretary Seddon, with the compliments of Mr. Parker--the author, I suppose. April 28 After a slight shower last night, a cool, clear morning. The ominous silence or pause between the armies continues. Lieut.-Gen. Longstreet, it is said, is hidden. I suppose he is working his way around the enemy's right flank. If so, we shall soon hear thunder. It is also supposed that Lee meditates an incursion into Pennsylvania, and that Gen. Beauregard will protect his rear and cover this city. All is merely conjecture. We are amuse
t, but clear most of the day. There are rumors of Burnside landing troops on the Peninsula; also of preparations for movements on the Rappahannock-by which side is uncertain. It is said troops are coming from Mississippi, Lieut.-Gen. (Bishop) Polk's command. The famine is still advancing, and his gaunt proportions loom up daily, as he approaches with gigantic strides. The rich speculators, however, and the officers of influence stationed here, who have secured the favor of the Express said the enemy's killed and wounded at Plymouth amounted to only 100: ours 300; but we got 2500 prisoners. President Lincoln has made a speech at Baltimore, threatening retaliation for the slaughter at Fort Pillow--which was stormed. Lieut.-Gen. Polk telegraphs that our forces have captured and burnt one of the enemy's gun-boats at Yazoo City-first taking out her guns, eight rifled 24-pounders. To-day Mr. Memminger, in behalf of the ladies in his department, presented a battle-flag t
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