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August 17th (search for this): chapter 42
ighting during the last few days. I fear we have not been so successful as usual. The enemy is reported to be in force on this side (north) of the river, and marching toward this city. The local (clerks) troops have been called out to man the fortifications. But the blow (if one really be meditated) may fall on the other (south) side of the river. Col. Moseby has taken 200 of the enemy near Berryville, burning 75 wagons, and capturing 600 horses and mules. His loss trifling. August 17 Cloudy, and slight showers. In the afternoon dark clouds going round. We have nothing from below but vague rumors, except that we repulsed the enemy yesterday, slaughtering the negro troops thrust in front. From Atlanta, it is said the enemy have measurably ceased artillery firing, and it is inferred that their ammunition is low, and perhaps their communications cut. The President and Secretary of War were in council all the morning, it is said, on appointments and promotio
August 18th (search for this): chapter 42
xcept that we repulsed the enemy yesterday, slaughtering the negro troops thrust in front. From Atlanta, it is said the enemy have measurably ceased artillery firing, and it is inferred that their ammunition is low, and perhaps their communications cut. The President and Secretary of War were in council all the morning, it is said, on appointments and promotions in the army. The President rode out toward the battle-field at ~12 1/2 P. M. There have been no guns heard to-day. August 18 Cloudy and pleasant. Still we have no authentic account of the details of the fights on the north side of the James River. We know we lost two brigadier-generals, and that we captured some 600 prisoners. Of the number killed and wounded on either side is all conjecture, although a semi-official statement makes our loss but light. Nevertheless, I happen to know that the President rode out yesterday, and remained until late in the night: for Mr. Craddock, his special detective (a
August 19th (search for this): chapter 42
d her younger brother, Thomas, had walked out to Hollywood Cemetery, where they could not only hear the firing, but could see the lines of smoke below the city, on the left or north bank. Between 6 and 7 P. M. the sound seemed to recede, indicating that the assault had been repulsed; and finally all was silent again. It is probable the bat. tlo raged likewise on the south side of the river, and it may be hoped the assault on Petersburg was similarly repulsed. We shall know to-morrow. August 19 Damp and cloudy. There was no serious battle. The wind was in a quarter which brought the sounds to us, even from the skirmishers, ten miles distant. But our gun-boats shelled the enemy out of their position on Signal Hill, and there was heavy cannonading along the line on the south side of the river. And, as appears by the papers, there was severe fighting at different points of the line. We have now some further details of the battle of Tuesday. Our loss was 1000; the enem
August 20th (search for this): chapter 42
and is sweeping in the direction of the Lynchburg and Danville Road. The speculators are on the qui vive already, and no flour can be had. I fear our flour will be intercepted, delayed, and perhaps lost The meat we got to-day will supply but two ounces for each member of my family daily for two months. This is war, terrible war! But if Grant is not rapidly reinforced, at the present rate of his losses his army will be consumed in two months. There is some consolation in that prospect! August 20 Rained hard all night, and a good deal to-day. Between 10 and 11 P. M. last evening, as we were retiring, a musket was fired somewhere in the rear of the building, and fragments of lime and brick were heard rattling against the window-shutters. This morning I perceived where the ball struck, a few inches below the window-sill of the chamber on the second floor, where Custis and Tom were lying. Some one, I suppose, had heedlessly fired his gun, after returning from the fortifications.
row. August 19 Damp and cloudy. There was no serious battle. The wind was in a quarter which brought the sounds to us, even from the skirmishers, ten miles distant. But our gun-boats shelled the enemy out of their position on Signal Hill, and there was heavy cannonading along the line on the south side of the river. And, as appears by the papers, there was severe fighting at different points of the line. We have now some further details of the battle of Tuesday. Our loss was 1000; the enemy's, it is said, 5000 to 8000. It is now, 5 P. M., raining gently, thank Heaven! To-day we had a distribution of meats, etc. brought from North Carolina by our agent. Custis and I invested $200: we have received 26 pounds bacon and 24 smoked herrings — worth here about $200. Half the money remains in the agent's hands, for which we expect to get 300 pounds of flour — if the enemy will let the railroads alone. It is believed another raid has crossed the Weldon Road, and i
markets in proportion. My yellow tomatoes are just maturing. The dry weather has ruined nearly everything else in the garden. August 9 Very hot; very dry; very dusty. The President has directed the late Gen. (now Lieut.--Col.) Pemberton to organize a mortar and cavalry force to dislodge the enemy from Deep Bottom, on this side of the river, and to select three or four batteries to render the navigation of the James River difficult and dangerous. Col. P. says he must have some 1500 cavalry, etc. Letters from Mr. McRae, our agent abroad, show that our finances and credit are improving wonderfully, and that the government will soon have a great many fine steamers running the blockade. Mr. McR. has contracted for eight steel-clad steamers with a single firm, Frazer, Trenholm & Co.-the latter now our Secretary of the Treasury. The President indorsed a cutting rebuke to both the Secretary of War and--Mr. (now Lieut.-Col.) Melton, A. A. General's office, to day. It w
August, 1864 AD (search for this): chapter 42
Xli. August, 1864 From the Northern papers. letter from J. Thompson, Canada. from Mr. McRae, our foreign agent. dispatch from Major Gen. Maury. General order no. 65. battle of Reams's Station. August 1 Hot and clear; but it rained yesterday threequarters of an hour in the afternoon. Our loss in the affair at Petersburg is about 800, the enemy's 3500. We captured 2000 small arms. We have nothing yet from Atlanta, but no doubt there has been another battle. I hope no disaster has befallen us there. No doubt the wires have been cut by the raiders, and roads also. It is a critical time in Georgia. But if Virginia triumphs over the assaults of Grant, all will go well. August 2 Bright and hot. At 4 P. M. a cloud rising. Fear my wife, and daughter Fannie, and Custis (who has a days' furlough), who went this morning per Fredericksburg Railroad into Hanover County to gather blackberries, will be caught in a rain. Nevertheless, the rain is wanted.
nt and his staff have arrived, that half his army preceded him, and the remainder will soon follow. The campaign is considered a disastrous failure, and it is anticipated that henceforth the scene of operations is to be transferred from Richmond to Washington. They say President Lincoln's face expresses great terror, and affairs there are in a critical condition. A dispatch from Gen. Lee states that Gen. Bradley Johnson's brigade of cavalry was surprised and routed on the 7th inst. by Averill. He has directed that Gen. J. be relieved. A dispatch from Gen. Hood (Atlanta, Ga.) says no important change in affair has occurred since yesterday, except that Major- Gen..Bates is wounded. There are 5000 militia in the trenches. August 12 Hot and dry. At 3 P. M. rained about three minutes. We are burning up. There is no war news. A rumor in the street says Atlanta has fallen. I don't believe it. Yesterday Gen. Hood said no important change had occurred, etc. I saw a
ain fell last night, wetting the earth to a considerable depth; and the wind being southeast, we look for copious showers — a fine season for turnips, etc. Cannon was distinctly heard from my garden yesterday evening, and considerable fighting has been going on down the river for several days; the result (if the end is yet) has not been officially stated. It is rumored that Pemberton lost more batteries; but it is only rumor, so far. Nor have we anything definite from Early or Hood. Bacon has fallen to $5 and $6 per pound, flour to $175 per barrel. I hope we shall get some provisions from the South this week. Sowed turnip-seed in every available spot of my garden to-day. My tomatoes are beginning to mature-better late than never. The following official dispatch was received on Saturday: Mobile, August 11th. Nothing later from Fort Morgan. The wires are broken. Gen. Forrest drove the enemy's advance out of Oxford last night. All the particulars of the Fort
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): chapter 42
t assert that still another raiding party, besides Stoneman's, was dispersed or captured. It is rumored to-day that Beauregard has sprung a mine under Grant's fortifications. This may be so. Later. It was not so. August 4 Clear and hot. rom their batteries, the existence of which we had no knowledge of before. No one was hurt. About the same time Gen. Beauregard sprung a mine under the enemy's mine, and blew it up, no doubt destroying many lives. This was succeeded by heavy, d our lines, the operations on this side of the river having been more a feint to draw our forces away; another that Gen. Beauregard attacked the enemy, finding their troops in large force had crossed over to this side, and this in the absence of Ge War was with the President from 11 A. M. till 3 P. M. This might be on appointments and promotions, and it might be on Beauregard. About 5 P. M. brisk artillery firing was heard in a southeast direction, which increased in rapidity, and apparent
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