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ook the place of the Penobscot. The rest of the fleet, including the Monitor, remained to watch the Merrimac. On the 1st of May, during an attack made on the left flank of the army, the fleet shelled the enemy's artillery, posted on a hill to the left, and forced it to retire. On the 5th, the day following the evacuation of Yorktown, the fleet moved up to a position off the town, and a reconnoissance made by the Chocura and Corwin showed that the river was open as far as West Point. On the 6th, Commander Smith moved the gun-boats up to that place, escorting the transports carrying General Franklin's division. On the 7th, before the landing of the troops was completed, a sharp attack was made by the enemy and repulsed, the gun-boats rendering efficient assistance. On the 17th, the Sebago and Currituck passed up the Pamunkey, which resulted in the destruction of the enemy's store-vessels. When the Wachusett was withdrawn to the James, five boats remained to protect McClellan's bas
. Forty per cent. of the command were now without shoes, two per cent. without trousers, and other clothing was deficient. And now, without any supplies, officers and men were well-nigh worn out. On the 5th, Carroll's brigade, now partially supplied, moved with only 1200 men and 1 battery, by order of General Shields, for Port Republic, to secure and hold the bridge at that crossing, if it should not Brevet Major-General Nathan Kimball. From a photograph. already be destroyed. On the 6th, Tyler's brigade of 2000 men and 1 battery followed to support Carroll. Ferry's brigade was at Columbia crossing, 8 miles south, and mine was 6 miles north of Luray. Fremont's and Jackson's guns were distinctly heard beyond the river and mountain, but we were powerless to render assistance to our friends because of the impassable river. On the 7th, Fremont forced the enemy from Mount Jackson, and pursued him to New Market and Harrisonburg, but failed to bring him to battle. On the 8th,
that some military superior both of General McClellan and myself should be placed in general command of all the operations in Virginia, with power to enforce joint action between the two armies within that field of operations. General Halleck was accordingly called to Washington and assigned to the command-in-chief of the army, The first step toward calling General Halleck to Washington appears in the President's telegram of July 2d asking if he could not come for a flying visit. On the 6th, Governor Sprague was sent to him at Corinth, on a confidential mission, arriving there on the 10th. Meanwhile the President had visited General McClellan and received from his hands the Harrison's Bar letter. On the 11th, General Halleck was appointed General-in-chief. Mr. Chase says in his diary (see Life and public services of S. P. Chase, by J. W. Schuckers, p. 447) that he and Mr. Stanton proposed to the President to send Pope to the James and give [Ormsby M.] Mitchel the command of t
On the 5th of September, 1862, the Kanawha Division was ordered by McClellan to report to General Burnside, commanding the Right Wing of the Army of the Potomac. For an account of the transfer of the Kanawha Division from West Virginia to the Potomac, see p. 2 81. The division was not engaged in the second battle of Bull. Run; but two regiments of Scammon's brigade were under fire at Bull Run Bridge, near Union Mills, August 27th.--Editors. We left Upton's Hill early on the morning of the 6th, crossed the river, and marched through Washington to Leesboro, Maryland, where the First Corps Confusion in the numbers of the First and Twelfth Corps is found in the records and correspondence. In the Army of Virginia, Sigel's corps (Eleventh) had been designated as First, Banks's (Twelfth) had been Second, and McDowell's (First) had been Third. In the Maryland campaign Hooker was assigned to McDowell's, which was sometimes called First and sometimes Third. Mansfield was assigned to B
to go and having to look for nothing except an attack on its rear, always moves with more freedom than a pursuing force. This is especially so where the country is covered with woods and thickets, and the roads are narrow. Advancing forces always have to feel their way for fear of being ambushed. The speed made by our forces from Corinth during the 5th was not to my liking, but with such a commander as McPherson in the advance, I could not doubt that it was all that was possible. On the 6th better progress was made. From Jonesborough, on October 7th, I telegraphed General Grant: Do not, I entreat you, call Hurlbut back; let him send away his wounded. It surely is easier to move the sick and wounded than to remove both. I propose to push the enemy, so that we need but the most trifling guards behind us. Our advance is beyond Ruckersville. Hamilton will seize the Hatchie crossing on the Ripley road to-night. A very intelligent, honest young Irishman, an ambulance driver,
to go and having to look for nothing except an attack on its rear, always moves with more freedom than a pursuing force. This is especially so where the country is covered with woods and thickets, and the roads are narrow. Advancing forces always have to feel their way for fear of being ambushed. The speed made by our forces from Corinth during the 5th was not to my liking, but with such a commander as McPherson in the advance, I could not doubt that it was all that was possible. On the 6th better progress was made. From Jonesborough, on October 7th, I telegraphed General Grant: Do not, I entreat you, call Hurlbut back; let him send away his wounded. It surely is easier to move the sick and wounded than to remove both. I propose to push the enemy, so that we need but the most trifling guards behind us. Our advance is beyond Ruckersville. Hamilton will seize the Hatchie crossing on the Ripley road to-night. A very intelligent, honest young Irishman, an ambulance driver,
nes in abandoning his vessel while she was ashore, but under cover of the Richmond's heavy battery, was a subject of well-merited reproach. On the night of the 13th of September occurred the destruction of the Confederate privateer Judah, in Pensacola harbor (see Vol. I., p. 32). A similar exploit was performed at Galveston early in November. The attacking party, under Lieutenant James E. Jouett, set out in two launches from the frigate Santee, Captain Henry Eagle, on the night of the 7th, and captured and burnt the privateer schooner Royal Yacht, carrying one 32-pounder. Thirteen prisoners were taken. The casualties in the Union force were 2 killed and 7 wounded. On the 16th of September, Ship Island, an important point commanding the passage of Mississippi Sound, which formed the water connection between New Orleans and Mobile, was evacuated by the Confederate forces. On the next day the steamer Massachusetts, under Captain Melancton Smith, landed a force and took poss
y of a, number of gun-boats, and made a landing the same day. General Franklin, in a letter on this subject, dated November 25th, 1881, says: My instructions were to await orders after landing, and not to advance. . . . We were attacked on the 7th, the object of the enemy being to drive us into the river. We had not made any attempt to advance, as such an attempt would have been in conflict with my orders. General John Newton, commander of the Federal brigade most heavily engaged, stat our position, but at the end of the day we occupied with our troops a position in advance of that held at the commencement of the action. General Gustavus W. Smith, who commanded the Confederate troops engaged, says: On the morning of the 7th, after becoming satisfied that the enemy did not intend to advance in force front under the protection of their gun-boats, I directed General Whiting to drive their skirmishers from the dense woods, and endeavor to get position in the open ground
during an attack made on the left flank of the army, the fleet shelled the enemy's artillery, posted on a hill to the left, and forced it to retire. On the 5th, the day following the evacuation of Yorktown, the fleet moved up to a position off the town, and a reconnoissance made by the Chocura and Corwin showed that the river was open as far as West Point. On the 6th, Commander Smith moved the gun-boats up to that place, escorting the transports carrying General Franklin's division. On the 7th, before the landing of the troops was completed, a sharp attack was made by the enemy and repulsed, the gun-boats rendering efficient assistance. On the 17th, the Sebago and Currituck passed up the Pamunkey, which resulted in the destruction of the enemy's store-vessels. When the Wachusett was withdrawn to the James, five boats remained to protect McClellan's base, under the command of Lieutenant Alexander Murray. During the siege of Yorktown the presence of the Merrimac had, of course,
s, and on the 2d of March he died, at the camp of the division, on the Great Cacapon River. The division began the movement under this order on the 5th, and on the 7th, while we were on the way, General Shields arrived from Washington and assumed command. General Banks had already crossed the Potomac with his divisions, and witr right at Harrisonburg, and our left near the crossing of the Shenandoah toward Luray. Under cover of these a part of the force under Edward Johnson moved, on the 7th, to prevent the capture of Staunton by Milroy. Meeting General Milroy at McDowell and checking Milroy's advance, Jackson again returned to our front. Both sides cckson's guns were distinctly heard beyond the river and mountain, but we were powerless to render assistance to our friends because of the impassable river. On the 7th, Fremont forced the enemy from Mount Jackson, and pursued him to New Market and Harrisonburg, but failed to bring him to battle. On the 8th, Carroll reached the
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