hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William T. Sherman 848 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee 615 1 Browse Search
Charleston (South Carolina, United States) 439 1 Browse Search
Washington (United States) 392 0 Browse Search
Chattanooga (Tennessee, United States) 374 0 Browse Search
George G. Meade 374 2 Browse Search
Joseph Hooker 371 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis 355 1 Browse Search
J. B. Hood 344 2 Browse Search
Braxton Bragg 343 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. Search the whole document.

Found 1,421 total hits in 275 results.

... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ...
Charles Sumner (search for this): chapter 1
s the region between Bull's Run and the Rapid Anna was the theater of many daring exploits by the cavalry of both armies. Finally, at the middle of April, Hooker's ranks were well filled by the return of absentees, and at the close of that month, when he felt prepared for a campaign, his army was in fine spirits, thoroughly disciplined, and numbered one hundred and ten thousand The Lacy House — Hooker's Headquarters. this is a view of the Lacy House, opposite Fredericksburg, from which Sumner observed the operations of his division on the 13th of December, 1862. see page 492, volume II. here for awhile, after he took command, Hooker had his Headquarters. It was the property of Major J. Horace Lacey, who had been a Major in the Confederate service. His mansion is one of the finest of the older houses in that region, and was built by William Fitzhugh, the father-in-law of the late Geo. W. P. Custis, the proprietor of Arlington House. Sea page 421, volume I. Major Lacey owned t
onfederate battery on the west branch of the Nansemond. He captured 6 guns and 200 prisoners. General Peck mentioned with commendation Generals Corcoran, Terry, Dodge, and Harland, and Colonels Dutton and Gibbs, commanding front lines; Colonels Gurney and Waddrop, commanding reserves; Colonels Spear and Onderdonk, of the cavalry. and Captain Follet. chief of artillery. The forts were in charge of the following officers: Fort Union, Colonel Drake; Nansernond, Colonel Hawkins; Halleck, Colonel Sullivan; Draw-bridge Battery, Colonel Davis; Battery Mansfield, Colonel Worth; the Redan and Battery Sosecrans, Colonel Thorpe; Battery Massachusetts, Captain Johnspn; Battery Montgomery, Colonel England; Battery Stevens, Colonel Pease; Fort Dix, Colonel McEvilly. and the Confederates, with overwhelming numbers, tried in vain every skill and strategy of modern warfare to accomplish their object. Finally, on the day when Hooker and Lee had their severe battle at Chaneellorsville, May 3, 1863.
George H. Stuart (search for this): chapter 1
brigades of Fitzhugh Lee, and W. H. F. Lee, of Stuart's cavalry, with 170 pieces of artillery, makins exploit Moseby was publicly commended by General Stuart, and he was promoted to major of cavalry. uquier County. On the 28th of February, General Stuart asked Governor Letcher's leave to collect yond the outposts. --Autograph. Letter of General Stuart. Permission was given. In the face of bristhese that night had an encounter with some of Stuart's cavalry, near Todd's tavern, on the road bet cavalry of Owen and Wickham on the right, and Stuart's and a part of Fitzhugh Lee's on the left, atade known to Lee during the night, he directed Stuart to incline to the right, while McLaws and Andeionists with fearful effect. At the same time Stuart's left and center pressed heavily upon Sickless men; but he was soon pressed back, and while Stuart was bearing heavily upon Sickles, Lee threw Anring heavily upon Slocum, succeeded in joining Stuart by a thin line. Lee's Headquarters were now[6 more...]
Stoughton (search for this): chapter 1
at the cavalry of both armies had been active for some weeks. On the 10th of February 1863. W. H. F. Lee, with his brigade, made an unsuccessful attempt to surprise and capture the National forces at Gloucester Point, opposite Yorktown; and at a little past midnight, a month later, March 8. a small band of mounted men, led by the afterward famous guerilla chief, John S. Moseby, dashed into the village of Fairfax Court-House, took from his bed and carried away the commanding officer, Colonel Stoughton, and some others, and, with many horses and other property, hurried off in the direction of Hooker's army, cutting the telegraph wires on their way. For this exploit Moseby was publicly commended by General Stuart, and he was promoted to major of cavalry. Moseby was a graduate of the University of Virginia, and a lawyer of some local repute. He had been one of Lee's most useful scouts for some time, and had proved himself to be a daring,dashing leader, who, inspired his few followe
Stonewall (search for this): chapter 1
taken to prevent desertions, and a conscription act, now put into rigorous operation, caused a rapid growth of his army in numbers. In the space of three months Stonewall Jackson's corps alone increased from twenty-five thousand to thirty-three thousand men. The Battle-fields of Virginia, volume I.: Chancellorsville, by Captain General G. Stoneman, who was the chief of the mounted men. Lee's army was composed of two corps, the First commanded by General Longstreet, and the Second by Stonewall Jackson. Of these General T. J. Jackson's entire corps, comprising the divisions of A. P. Hill, D. H. Hill, Trimble, and Early, and the divisions of Anderson an building seen on the left was Hooker's Headquarters tent (see page 24), at near the close of April. The river is always fordable here at low water. had called Stonewall Jackson's large force up from Moss Neck and its vicinity when Sedgwick made his demonstration, and now, with his army well in hand, from Hamilton's Crossing, on
G. Stoneman (search for this): chapter 1
lly's Ford Moseby, the guerrilla chief, 22. Stoneman's raid movement for flanking the Confederate and the remainder of the horsemen, under General Stoneman, pushed on toward Rapid Anna Station and of the Army of the Potomac, commanded by General Stoneman, was raiding on the communications of the Army of Northern Virginia with Richmond. Stoneman crossed the Rappahannock May 29, 1863. with thee the Confederates could then spare to oppose Stoneman's ten thousand, but he pressed forward throug Thompson's Four Corners, where, at midnight, Stoneman gave orders for operations upon Lee's communi canal flow over the river, and then rejoined Stoneman. Kilpatrick, with the Harris Light Cavalry (, and damaged the road. Finally the whole of Stoneman's command, excepting the forces under Kilpatr raiders had recrossed the Rappahannock. Had Stoneman's. forces been concentrated, and their destruSuffolk. On the 30th of January, 1865, General Stoneman wrote: I have always looked upon it as a [6 more...]
A. Von Steinwehr (search for this): chapter 1
ave observed, occupied the right of the army, and was composed of the divisions of Generals to Devens, Carl Schurz, and Steinwehr. Devens was on the right, Schurz in the center and Steinwehr on the left. Works for the protection of the corps were Steinwehr on the left. Works for the protection of the corps were thrown up parallel to the plank road and the turnpike, facing southward. At the left of these was Steinwehr's divisions, joining Sickles. Devens, on the extreme right, was west of the intersection of the two roads mentioned, near Talley's house. Steinwehr's divisions, joining Sickles. Devens, on the extreme right, was west of the intersection of the two roads mentioned, near Talley's house. The mass of his force occupied the works at that place. A portion of the brigades on the extreme right was thrown across the turnpike facing the west, and protected by slight breastworks and an abatis. Two pieces of artillery were on the plank roadhaff, leaving half their number dead or dying on the field. While the divisions of Devens and Schurz were crumbling, Steinwehr quickly changed front and threw Buschbeck's brigade into works near Melzie Chancellor's (Dowdall's tavern), where some
A. Steinwehr (search for this): chapter 1
ommanders were Generals J. S. Wadsworth J. C. Robinson, A. Doubleday, W. S. Hancock, J. Gibbon, W. H. French, D. D. Birney, H. G. Berry, A. W. Whipple, W. T. H. Brooks, A. P. Howe, J. Newton, C. Griffin, G. Sykes, A. A. Humphreys, C. Devens, A. Von Steinwehr, C. Schurz, S. Williams, J. W. Geary, A. Pleasanton, J. Buford, and W. W. Averill. The last three were commanders of cavalry under General G. Stoneman, who was the chief of the mounted men. Lee's army was composed of two corps, the Firstonfusion the fugitives rushed along the road toward Chancellorsville, upon the position of General Carl Schurz, whose division had already retreated, in anticipation of the onset, and the turbulent tide of frightened men rolled back upon General A. Von Steinwehr, utterly regardless of the exertions of the commander of the corps and his subordinate officers to check their flight. Only a few regiments, less demoralized than the others, made resistance, and these were instantly scattered like chaf
parties, and storm the Confederate works along their entire occupied line. Two storming columns were formed from Newton's division, one of four, and the other of two regiments; The column of four regiments, on the right, was commanded by Colonel Spear, of the Sixty-first Pennsylvania, and was composed of his own regiment and the Forty-third New York, supported by the Sixty-seventh New York and Eighty-second Pennsylvania, The left column, of three regiments, was commanded by Colonel Johns, Nansemond. He captured 6 guns and 200 prisoners. General Peck mentioned with commendation Generals Corcoran, Terry, Dodge, and Harland, and Colonels Dutton and Gibbs, commanding front lines; Colonels Gurney and Waddrop, commanding reserves; Colonels Spear and Onderdonk, of the cavalry. and Captain Follet. chief of artillery. The forts were in charge of the following officers: Fort Union, Colonel Drake; Nansernond, Colonel Hawkins; Halleck, Colonel Sullivan; Draw-bridge Battery, Colonel Davis
H. W. Slocum (search for this): chapter 1
neral O. O. Howard, and the Twelfth, by General H. W. Slocum. The division commanders were Generalscorps of Meade (Fifth), Howard (Eleventh), and Slocum (Twelfth), was put in motion. Its destination the center column, moved along the turnpike. Slocum's entire corps (Twelfth), with Howard's (Elevecompelled the chief to withhold his sanction. Slocum and Jackson had met on the plank road, and str, with a division of Couch's, formed the left; Slocum's and a division of Sickles's the center, and ter, formed by the corps of Generals Couch and Slocum, but the assailing force, whose heaviest demonwith their faces toward Fredericksburg, joined Slocum's, Hancock's division being thrown back in a plsed him, while Anderson, bearing heavily upon Slocum, succeeded in joining Stuart by a thin line. d army to make a general advance. Sickles and Slocum were both forced back by an overwhelming pressur troops. On the 1st of January, 1865, General Slocum wrote: I think the gratitude of the nation[6 more...]
... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ...